Still Trying To Figure It Out. Literally.

This is one of those late Sunday night I’m-overtired-and-starting -to-get-a-wee-headache-but-this-is-such-a-great-confusing-idea-I-need-to -ask-my- friends-about-it blog.

In the future I am going to feature Anna Berezovksya and what she sees as bringing together techniques unique to realism, abstraction and surrealism. Her paintings are colorful, imaginative, and a delight to the sensibilities of us all. Here is one of her pictures:

 

 

Okay. If you can get past the initial shock of weirdness about it, it’s really finely done: the faces, the detail, the texture. 

If you want to take a bit and “study” the picture, what is it saying? People following each other to the edge of the cliff (that’s my first thought). Okay. Different personalities are reacting differently. One has a movie camera, one is dangling their feet, one is a sailor, one is a king.

What does the seagull have to do with it? The fish skeleton? The apple? Why is the crescent moon hiding in those long braids? What is the book the king is holding? Why is the sailor wearing a hoop earring?

Okay Okay. Those questions are neither here nor there. We can interpret this painting however we wish. I’m sure Miss Berezovksya has her own explanation, too.

Here comes the spacey thoughts.

I am a writer. We are taught to be thorough (though not lengthy) in our explanations and descriptions. We have to create mood, atmosphere, and rhythm in our writings. 

How would I explain this picture? Or the story of this picture?

This is in the same stratosphere as describing a Jackson Pollack or a Juan Gris painting.

I believe there is an explanation for everything. A reason for everything. From why cacti have needles for spines to why a spider has so many eyes. So there is an explanation for Abstract Art, Abstract Expressionism, Cubism, Conceptualism.

Some paintings are crystal clear. A portrait. A landscape. A Still Life. And many modern styles need no explanation — they are more of a tool to elicit response and emotion rather than make sense.

But I wonder if some are not meant to be understood.

Writing always has to make sense. Otherwise you will follow the rabbit down the rabbit hole never come out the same. You would be like “what did I just read??” Your brain would scramble to make sense of sentences and tenses and made up words.

So the question of the day is — how do you describe the indescribable? The nonsensical? The busy and the confusing?

As you can see, it’s way past my bedtime…..

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Rukiye Garip

Rukiye Garip was born in 1964 in Bartin, Turkey.She graduated from Gazi University Vocational Education Faculty in 1985.

After her graduation she lived in Ankara, working as a graphic designer.

Garip went to a ceramic workshop in 1987 with a group of friends, and in 1989, started working as an art teacher.

After working in different provinces and schools for 20 years, Garip retired and opened up her own workshop in Balıkesi.

The main distinguishing feature in Garip’s artwork are hidden in the details. She enjoys the peaceful effect of blue and green in her pictures.“Everything that looks good to me in nature can be the subject of my pictures,” Garip explains.

“I want to illustrate as much as possible natural beauties that disappear rapidly and cannot be returned. Not getting rid of the details — I want my work to be noticed for the tiny, beautiful, happy details.”More of Rukiye Garip‘s enchanting paintings can be found at https://www.instagram.com/rukiyegarip/ and https://wooarts.com/rukiye-garip/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Mark A. Pearce

Mark A. Pearce is like many of the artists showcased in the Sunday Evening Art Gallery – there are so many fascinating facets of his craft (painting, print making, linocuts) that showcase his marvelous eye for nature.Pearce learned the art of printmaking at Carlisle College of Art, then continued his studies at the Norwich School of Art in England.A professional printmaker and landscape artist living and working in the coastal village of Ravenglass, the local landscape provides much of the inspiration for his work.Of all his many creative talents, Pearce is his well known for his vibrant multi-colored reduction linocuts.A design is meticulously cut into a linoleum surface with a sharp knife, V-shaped chisel or gouge, with the raised (uncarved) areas representing a reversal (mirror image) of the parts to be printed.

The linoleum sheet is inked with a roller and then impressed onto paper or fabric.Pearce’s work shares the colors and serenity of his world with a steady hand and precise determination. More of Mark Pearce‘s paintings and linocuts can be found at https://markapearce.co.uk/.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Maria Prymachenko

Maria Oksentiyivna Prymachenko (1908-1997) was a Ukrainian village self-taught folk art painter who worked in the naïve art style with drawing, embroidery and painting on ceramics.A peasant woman, Prymachenko was born in the village of Bolotnya in the north of the modern Kiev region of Ukraine.Born to humble means, Prymachenko earned fame in her lifetime for dazzlingly colorful and wildly inventive scenes of animals — lions, birds, horses, and other beasts — covered in riotously hued, almost psychedelic patterns.Born to a peasant family near Chernobyl, the artist suffered from polio as a child, an illness that left her confined to bed for much of her childhood (a later surgery would enable her to walk independently).Her illness instilled a great sense of empathy for the suffering of others, and her caring for all living creatures was to become an important element in her art.Prymachenko found her sources and themes in the decorative wall paintings that were prominent features in Ukraine, in lullabies, folk legends, and fairy tales, and in the nature that surrounded her.In her pieces, the artist unites her marvelous internal world with the age-old tradition of folk  and pagan culture.In 1966, Prymachenko was awarded the Taras Shevchenko National Prize of Ukraine, one of the country’s highest honors, and in the last decades of her life admirers supplied Prymachenko with materials to create larger format works.More of Maria Prymachenko’s inspirational ethic art can be found at ArtNet and WikiArt.

Two Fun Creative Blogs to Check Out!

Happy Friday Friends!

Today I read two fun, amazing, creative people and their blogs that I follow that  you must check out!

One you have already heard me talk about — Daily Fiber with Laura Kate. This quilt is just amazing. And so different.

 

Friday Finish: Badlands

The second is from a blog I just started following — jingersnaps …by Jinger. Her knitting is fun and amazing and different — as is her enthusiasm!

Zau. Ber. Ball.

Posted on 
I love Creativity in ALL its forms!  Any referrals?
.
.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Matthias Jung

Matthias Jung is an artist and graphic designer based in Germany,  known internationally for his surrealist collages.Jung worked as an illustrator before making his way to painting, developing an unmistakable collage style.The artist takes individual photographs in different locations, mostly in northern Germany, before carefully assembling them into one cohesive piece, abstaining from sensational effects and superficiality.By artistically arranging scraps of reality, Jung intensifies the picture in a way the human eye can only partially detect – and it is through our own associations that his constructions come alive.Jung often sets fantastic building facades afloat amidst vast landscapes,  their pointy domes and tall arching windows reflecting a possible surrealistic yet realistic world.Jung calls his surreal works “short, architectural poems”, incongruous images that are intended to challenge perceptions of space and architecture.According to the artist, the individual elements of the image tend to generate an electric tension with each other.  This tension leads to new worlds in which the entire beauty of his art is revealed.“Collages are like dreams,” Jung reflects.  “Or maybe dreams are like collages.”More of Matthias Jung‘s surrealistic artwork can be found at https://www.lumas.com/artist/matthias_jung/ and https://www.singulart.com/en/artist/matthias-jung-12125.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Micah Ofstedahl

Micah Ofstedahl is an artist from Austin, Minnesota who enjoys creating what some have called abstract surrealism.Inspired at a young age by the art of Salvador Dali, Ofstedahl went on to study sculpture in college before focusing on surrealist painting.Ofstedahl’s paintings are semi-representational, and in creating his abstract art he is drawing on the rich diversity of forms found in nature.He explores in his work the hidden sides of reality, his focus often on such things as microscopic patterns in nature and the composition of the cells in our own bodies.These are subjects that biology and microbiology continue to explore, from the neurons in our brains to the fabric of the universe.Upon immersing observers within the acrylic painter’s inspirational environments,  the artist’s glassy, shimmering spectrum ripples are finally visible.“In my quest for inspiration I am constantly being amazed by the hidden beauty and complexity of the world and this is largely what I hope to convey to my audience,” Ofsterdahl explains.More of Micah Ofstedahl‘s unusual paintings can be found at https://www.micahofstedahl.com/ and https://www.instagram.com/micahofstedahl/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Jennybird Alcantara

Jennybird Alcantara is a Contemporary Surrealist painter from Oakland, California.

Deeply inspired by mythology, transformation, and the logic of liminal, dreamlike states, Alcantara is celebrated for her oil paintings of fantastic worlds populated by whimsical creatures and symbols.Characterized by ornate forms painted in luminous colors including pinks and reds, Alcantara’s style appears to be influenced by both academic realism and popular Surrealists.

Her art has been described as morbidly romantic, with a dreamlike narrative at its core, reflecting the connections between living beings and their environments.

Some works combine human and animal forms as well as flowers and decorative objects in a single composition that resembles a portrait or silhouette.Alcantara combines these motifs to create a symbol of the universal connection between all beings.She claims that she takes an intuitive approach to creating her brilliantly hued paintings.Alcantara’s art uses the symbolism of duality to explore the connection of life and death and the veil in between, as well as the relationship between the beauty and cruelness of nature, that of the natural world as well as human and animal nature.

More of Jennybird Alcantara’s wonderful art can be found at https://www.jennybirdart.com/.

 

 

Faded Memories — Tiffany Arp-Daleo Art (repost)

I love the colors, I love the thought of Asemic writing. Tiffany always seems to capture my mood through her paintings. Especially on this Saturday night.

Maybe her colors and her style will capture your mood, too….

There’s something mysterious about Asemic writing. What does it say? What does it mean? What language is it?? The answer is nothing. Asemic writing is just scribbles, marks, and nonsense. It adds whimsy and character to abstract art. It can suggest a love letter, a dear John letter, all kinds of scenarios! I’m constantly reminded […]

Faded Memories — Tiffany Arp-Daleo Art

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — The Art of Food

The articleThe Fascination with Food in Art History” by Elena Martinique at Whitewalls states that, as a cornerstone of our very existence, food has always played a significant part in our social and cultural lifestyles. Thus, it is no wonder that the depiction of food in art spans across cultures and all of recorded human history.

Just as majestic as any portrait or landscape, the depiction of food through painting is an arduous and creative talent.

As we sit and enjoy our Sunday dinners, let us wander through the world of food artistry and enjoy some of the more famous interpretations of the sight and taste of food.

 

Apples and Oranges, Paul Cézanne, 1895

 

Vertumnus, Giuseppe Arcimboldo, 1590

 

Mound of Butter, Antoine Vollon, 1875-1885

 

Still Life with Apples, Vincent van Gogh, 1887

 

Viva la Vida, Watermelons, Frida Kahlo, 1954

 

Eucharistic Still Life, Salvador Dalí, 1952

 

Fruit and Vegetables with a Monkey, a Parrot, and a Squirrel, Frans Snyders, 1620

 

Still-Life with Cheeses, Almonds and Pretzels, Clara Peeters, 1615

 

Still Life with Cherries, Strawberries, and Gooseberries, Louise Moillon, 1630

 

Cauliflower And Pomegranates, Pierre Auguste Renoir, 1890

 

Still-Life with Ham, Lobster, and-Fruit, Jan-Davidsz de Heem, 1652

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Jenny Foster

Growing up in a small town on the Colorado River in Arizona, Jenny Foster gravitated toward art at an early age.Foster studied fine art at Arizona State University and graduated with a degree in graphic design.Her style is both primitive and contemporary, and she delivers it with a combination of abstract shapes and happy colors and symbols.To many artists, it is a great challenge to express feelings of personality in their art without injecting some realism.But Foster has mastered the art enough to do this through symbols and abstract forms.Foster’s works are inspired by her appreciation of nature, happy colors, and the spirit of life.The artist lets her palette and brush express her imagination.She prefers to achieve quality without adding too much detail or sophistication, keeping everything simple and fresh.

More of Jenny Foster’s inspirational artwork can be found at  http://jennyfoster.com/.

 

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Emily Kame Kngwarreye

Emily Kame Kngwarreye (or Emily Kam Ngwarray) (1910 – 1996) was an Aboriginal Australian artist from the Utopia community in the Northern Territory of Australia.She is one of the most prominent and successful artists in the history of Australian art.Her remarkable work was inspired by her cultural life as an Anmatyerre elder, and her lifelong custodianship of the women’s Dreaming sites in her clan Country, Alhalkere.Kngwarreye began painting on canvas in her late seventies after decades of ritual artistic activity and batik fabric painting.Unlike most desert painters at the time, Kngwarreye did not use stylized representations of animal tracks or concentric circles in her designs.Instead, she employed richly layered brushstrokes or dabs throughout her abstract compositions.Her free handling of paint using various implements, keen sense of color, and dynamic compositions earned her international fame.It was in Alhalkere that the essence of her being resided, and it was her Dreaming that was the source of the creative power, of her knowledge.So profound was her identification with Alhalkere that it infused her life and her belief system, and governed her kinship relations and connections with other people.More of  Emily Kame Kngwarreye‘s  amazing original works can be found at https://www.wikiart.org/en/emily-kame-kngwarreye and https://artguide.com.au/art-plus/emily-kame-kngwarreye/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Amy Brown

Amy Brown is one of my all-time favorite artists. I’ve loved her work since I role-played a faerie woman 20 years ago.

Brown has always been interested in fairies, but never considered painting them as a career option until one day her boss asked her to paint something to fill an empty frame that had been sitting around the art gallery where she worked.Brown  asked what she should paint and her boss said,  “I don’t know, paint a fairy or something.”  So she did.It was like the faeries were pushing her to paint their portraits.After selling prints and originals at street fairs and in local shops for a few years, Brown  opened a website and began selling her work online worldwide.The business has since take on a life of its own.Using colors, designs, and background, Brown has truly captured the world and the imagination of the faerie world. Each faerie glows with a personality all their own. “My passion to paint is like a living creature inside me,” Brown said.

“All the ideas in my head churn and beg to get out. I’m driven to get them onto paper and out of my head as soon as possible.” “Once I’ve conjured one creature, another is waiting impatiently for its turn.”

More of Amy Brown‘s magical art can be found at https://amybrownart.com/.

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Kim Tschang-Yeul

 Kim Tschang-Yeul’s most well-known paintings, in which droplets of water appear to protrude from monochromatic canvases, are in fact optical illusions, melding abstraction and figuration. Born in 1929 in the north of the then unified Korea, Tschang-Yeul migrated to the south to escape the communist regime.He subsequently left for New York to pursue his artistic dreams before finally settling in Paris in 1969.There, he began to nurture, over a period of forty years, a unique motif: the drop of water.This motif stems from traditions of Eastern philosophy, acting both as a therapy for the artist’s traumatic memories and a meditation on eternity.“My water drop paintings are accomplished under the encounters of my life experiences and my plasticizing experiences,” Tschang-Yeul explains.“Each clear, impeccable water drop is in its initial state since purification, as if it is a recurrence of absolute nothingness; the water drop is also what it finally returns to.” More of Kim Tschang-Yeul’s  wonderfully unique paintings can be found at Tina Kim Gallery and Artnet. 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Oscar-Claude Monet

Oscar-Claude Monet (1840-1926), born in Paris, was raised on the Normandy coast in Le Havre, where his father sold ships’ provisions.Banks of the Seine, Vétheuil

He gained a local reputation as a caricaturist while still a teenager, and landscape painter Eugène Boudin invited the budding artist to accompany him as he painted scenes at the local beaches.Chrysanthemums

Monet went to Paris in 1862 to study painting and there befriended fellow students Auguste Renoir, Alfred Sisley, and Frédéric Bazille, who would later form the core group of the original impressionists.The Cliff-at Etretat Sunset

By the end of the 1860s Monet had largely abandoned ambitious, large-scale figurative painting in favor of smaller, spontaneous landscape works executed en plein air.The Water Lily Pond

Monet fled to London during the Franco-Prussian War, and in late 1871 settled at Argenteuil, a suburb just west of Paris, which soon became known as the hub of impressionist painting.Boats on the Beach at Etretat

Financial difficulties forced Monet to relocate to Vétheuil in 1878, and a few years later, in 1883, he settled in Giverny, where he would live for the rest of his life.Water Lilies

Executed outdoors, he employed seemingly spontaneous brushstrokes to capture the ever-changing effects of light and atmosphere.Woman with a Parasol

In the 1880s Monet expanded his motifs, turning his attention both to the Mediterranean and to the rugged vistas along the Normandy coast.View of Le Havre

In the 1890s he undertook a number of paintings produced in series, including pictures of poplars, grainstacks, and Rouen Cathedral; each work captured a specific atmospheric effect and time of day..Haystack

More of Claude Monet‘s magical paintings can be found at https://www.claudemonetgallery.org/ and https://www.claude-monet.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Salman Khoshroo

Iranian painter Salman Khoshroo uses a palette knife and sizable layers of paint to create the emotive portraits in his recent series, “White on White.”In contrast to his previous work that relied on swirling reds, blues, and yellows, Khoshroo’s latest impasto pieces are monochromatic.Starting with a hunk of paint, the artist then forms the portrait’s outline before shaping the rest of the face that lacks distinct physical features.Viewers can follow his creative process step-by-step by looking at the edges of each stroke.Khoshroo hopes to capture a human spark with minimal intervention and create portraits of people that make you feel something, people you didn’t even know you were looking for.Painted with a single pigment in a sandbox method, these faces are the result of taking a chunk of paint and molding it.It is amazing that one can see so many features in such few movements.

More of Salman Khoshroo‘s diverse art can be found at http://salmankhoshroo.com/ and https://www.ignant.com/2019/12/30/a-portrait-of-anonymity-salman-khoshroo-molds-emotive-faces-from-smeared-paint/

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Viktor Mikhailovich Zundalev

 

Mikhailovich Zundalev is one of those artists that have very little personal information online, yet whose paintings bring a warm, fresh feeling to the heart.Zundalev was born in 1953 in Ryzan, Russia.After graduating from the Art School named after G. K. Wagner, Zundalev began painting colorful flower arrangements. According to his scant biography, he paints, participates in exhibitions,  and at the same time works as an artist for many years in the Art Fund of the city of Kaluga.In 1989, he was admitted to the Union of Artists of the USSR.His paintings are textured, colorful, and full of life. One can only dream of having one of his vased bouquets  in the center of their table.

Zundalev may or not be an actual painter, but his works reflect the beauty of light and scent and nature.

Viktor Mikhailovich Zundalev‘s lovely paintings can be found scattered throughout the Internet, including ArtNow .

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Lady Pink

Whether portraying women as provocative street warriors in the concrete jungle or as mythical goddesses placed in surrealist environments, Lady Pink, the long-reigning queen of graffiti, consistently elevates the female figure through her murals and paintings by incorporating themes of fantasy, spiritualism, her South American heritage, and indigenous iconography.Lady Pink was born Sandra Fabara in Ecuador in 1964 and raised in New York City.She started making graffiti at the age of 15 and quickly became well known as the only prominent female in the graffiti subculture.Pink’s beginning focus was on painting subway trains.She had first solo exhibition at 21 and her paintings are included in important collections like the MET, The Whitney Museum, The Museum of the City of N.Y. and others.Pink has gone great lengths to fight for equality, justice, and women’s rights.She expresses her private opinion to public work, without any censors, although she never reveals the idea in fullness.She cleverly states out what is important, and warmly put her artwork open to interpretation.Pink’s  tradition is to practice mindfulness and to be as sensible as possible to the community.“Art is about a binary relationship, and the audience is free to make assumptions and interpretations as they like,” she says about her work.More of Lady Pink‘s murals and paintings can be found at https://www.ladypinknyc.com/.

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Robert Walker

 

Color Color Color is the first thing you notice in Robert Walker’s paintings.

Wizard Power

 

Bright, bursting, symmetrical color.

Osebac

 

Robert Walker is a Los Angeles based artist and art historian.

Ten Speeder

 

 

Walker taught art history at the college level for 25 years and has lectured at universities in both the US, Japan and Thailand and numerous museums in Southern California.

E-maze II

 

During his 45 year practice he has fabricated paintings and sculpture that reveal his deep interest in Eastern religions and practices.

Rachguine

 

A common theme is the bold use of color and patterns, inspired by the Buddhist mandala tradition; the effect is colorful, expressive and almost hypnotic.

Awiroh

 

Walker’s paintings often have a sculptural element, using the materiality of paint to create bas-relief areas across the canvas.

Captcha III

 

You can feel the Eastern influence in all of his work if you only look.

Maieutic

 

More of Robert Walker‘s colorful art can be found at http://www.robertwalkerstudio.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Erin Hanson

 

Combining the emotional resonance of 19th-century Impressionists with the lavish color palette of Expressionism, Erin Hanson’s unique style has come to be known as “Open Impressionism.”Erin Hanson began painting as a young girl, voraciously learning oils, acrylics, watercolor, pen and ink, pastels, and life drawing from accomplished art instructors. She began commissioning paintings at age ten, and by age twelve, she was employed after school by a mural studio, learning the techniques of acrylics on the grand scale of forty-foot canvases. Graduating high school at age sixteen and once again demonstrating that she was a child prodigy, Hanson next attended UC Berkeley, excelling further in her studies and creative development and attaining a degree in Bioengineering.Two years later, a high school scholarship took her to Otis College of Art, where she immersed herself in figure drawing.After graduating from college, Hanson entered the art trade as a professional, inspired by landscapes and vantage points only beheld by the most adventurous.For the past decade Hanson has been developing a unique, minimalist technique of placing impasto paint strokes without layering, which has become known as “Open-Impressionism.”Her passion for natural beauty is seen in her work as she transforms vistas familiar and rare into stunning interpretations of bold color, playful rhythms and raw emotional impact. “I am not trying to re-create a photograph, I am trying to get my viewers to open their eyes and see their world a little differently,” Hanson said.More of Erin Hanson’s imaginative paintings can be found at https://www.erinhanson.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Wawiriya Burton

Wawiriya Burton is an Australian Aboriginal artist known for her acrylic paintings.

Burton belongs to the Pitjantjatjara, an Aboringinal people of the Central Australian desert near Uluru.She was born in outback central Australia sometime during the 1920s, and grew up living a traditional, nomadic way of life.

She originally specialized in baskets and punu (wood carvings) from spinifex (a  perennial coastal plant) at the Tjala Arts Centre in Southern Australia in 2008, but later learned to paint from other women.

Her paintings are representations of sacred stories from the Dreamtime.Like other Aboriginal artists, the representations are blurred (or encrypted) for cultural reasons.The full meaning of her artworks can only be understood or deciphered by people who have been initiated.Burton is a ngangkaṟi (traditional healer), so she has more knowledge about sacred traditions than most in her community.

More of Wawiriya Burton‘s soul filled paintings can be found at Wikipedia and Aboriginal Signature.

 

 

Repost — The Endeavourers’ Reveal Day, August 2021 — Opposite Day — Deep in the Heart of Textiles

Another amazingly creative Artist! I love her work! Go check out how she did this!

 

Once a quarter I make an art quilt for an online group, The Endeavourers.  This time the theme was “Opposites Attract.” I had a very hard time coming up with anything, but finally I remembered the fun of having “Opposite Day” when my kids were little — eating dinner for breakfast (starting with dessert), wearing […]

The Endeavourers’ Reveal Day, August 2021 — Opposite Day — Deep in the Heart of Textiles

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Pablo Picasso

Pablo Ruiz Picasso (1881 – 1973) was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, and theatre designer who spent most of his adult life in France.

The Old Guitarist

 

Regarded as one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture, the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore.

Guernica

 

Picasso demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a naturalistic manner through his childhood and adolescence.

Family of Saltimbanques

 

During the first decade of the 20th century, his style changed as he experimented with different theories, techniques, and ideas.

Girl before a Mirror

 

After 1906, the Fauvist work of the slightly older artist Henri Matisse motivated Picasso to explore more radical styles, beginning a fruitful rivalry between the two artists, who subsequently were often paired by critics as the leaders of modern art.

Three Musicians

 

Much of Picasso’s work of the late 1910s and early 1920s is in a neoclassical style, and his work in the mid-1920s often has characteristics of Surrealism.

Gertrude Stein

 

His later work often combines elements of his earlier styles.

The Weeping Woman

 

Exceptionally prolific throughout the course of his long life, Picasso achieved universal renown and immense fortune for his revolutionary artistic accomplishments, and became one of the best-known figures in 20th-century art.

Picasso Statue, Chicago

 

More of Pablo Picasso’s wonderful art can be found at https://www.pablopicasso.org/ and http://www.picasso.com/.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Leslie Cobb

Leslie Cobb has shared her life with cats since she was a child and cannot imagine living without them.

Cobb tries to capture their unique qualities in her art.She uses acrylic paint because it washes easily out of cat fur when some of her models choose to take a more active role in the artistic process.Cobb is mostly self-taught; her formal training  limited to high school art classes and a couple of drawing courses at a community college.She began painting in 1998 after the death of her one-eyed cat, Esmeralda.The two had been together for 19 years; Cobb’s early paintings were an effort to honor her memory and cope with her grief.Cobb’s work has been displayed at art galleries, craft fairs and cat shows.She is also the illustrator of “Good St. Dominic’s Cat,” a children’s book by Ed Noonan, and her art appears on the covers of the Crazy Cat Lady mystery series of books by Mollie Hunt.

More of Leslie Cobb’s wonderful cat paintings can be found at http://www.lesliecobb.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Albrecht Dürer

Albrecht Dürer (1471 –1528) was a German painter, printmaker, and theorist of the German Renaissance.

Praying Hands

 

He was a brilliant painter, draftsman, and writer, though his first and probably greatest artistic impact was in the medium of printmaking.

Saint Jerome in his Study

 

Born in Nuremberg, Dürer established his reputation and influence across Europe in his twenties due to his high-quality woodcut prints.

Adam and Eve

 

He was in contact with the major Italian artists of his time, including Raphael and Leonardo da Vinci, and from 1512 was patronized by Emperor Maximilian I.

Portrait of Emperor Maximilian I

 

He believed that geometry was essential for producing harmonic artworks, and thus that it should be taught to all young artists, alongside other mathematical rigors.

Feast of the Rosary

 

Despite his decidedly Renaissance interest in Humanism and mathematics, Dürer continued to produce extremely detailed studies of the natural world, particularly animals, be they newly discovered in Europe (such as the mythical rhinoceros and lion) or common native creatures (such as the hare, owl, or cat).

Young Hare

 

Dürer was well aware of his own artistic genius, which equally tortured and enlivened him.

The Knight Death and the Devil

 

He painted a number of empowering self-portraits, and would often appear as a character in his painted commissions.

Self Portrait

 

More of Albrecht Dürer‘s art can be found at http://www.albrechtdurer.org.

 

 

 

Wow!

Okay okay!

I need to take a breath!

I’ve been catching up on my Reader reading these past few days, and have I found some interesting, spectacular, enjoyable art of all kinds from my artistic friends! I mean, WOW!

I can’t decide if I want to highlight all of them in one blog, do one blog a day for five days, one blog a week, give them full spread value, mix them up between my wit and wanton words …

I cannot believe I am so fascinated with the world of ART. I mean — it’s only a way to pass the time, isn’t it? It’s only using a pair of scissors to cut out a design.  A bit of glue and fabric on a piece of paper. A few brush strokes on a piece of canvas. 

Of course, if you believe that, our relationship is tainted.

Seriously, though. 

When one practices what they love over and over again, miracles happen. Little miracles, big miracles. Half miracles. Because it’s the soul, the ether, the cosmic power of life and beyond coming through.

Whew! Big words! Big emotions! Big exclamation points!

I think I’ll showcase them — and others — a couple of times a week.  There are sooooooo many people whose work I enjoy, and I’m always making new friends out there, too, whose work is ever inspiring. Just last week I highlighted Carsten Wieland and his creative painting videos — just sitting and watching him create is amazing.

I should make up a week about celebrating artists. But I’d be celebrating 52 weeks a year. And I already do that!

Keep on being inspired! Keep on Creating!

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Matthew Grabelsky

Using the New York City subway system as the setting for his work, Matthew Grabelsky paints surreal portraits of people who are seemingly normal from the neck down, but who have had their heads replaced by animals, both wild and domesticated.Grabelsky graduated Cum Laude from Rice University in 2002 with a BA in Art and Art History,  along with a BS in Astrophysics.Grabelsky’s paintings are inspired by the years he spent riding the subways in New York as a kid and by his early fascination with Greek mythology.Small details including zoo posters, stickers, T-shirts, and toys add humor to the art, while light reflecting off subway tiles and molded sets show the artist’s technical ability to paint hyperrealistic scenes.Grabelsky’s paintings are an exploration of human nature and of the way that animals represent various parts of the human subconscious.“The characters are symbolic of the kinds of thoughts that lie under the surface of people’s minds, and they reveal that the most extraordinary can exist in the most ordinary of everyday settings,” the artist has said.“This theme is communicated through the juxtaposition of these ostensibly irrational images with otherwise completely mundane scenes.

My idea is that my creatures are not original but are ultimately part of a much larger cultural continuum.”

More of Matthew Grabelsky‘s delightful art can be found at https://www.grabelsky.com/.

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Paul Dmoch

Paul Dmoch is a Belgian painter whose watercolors are playgrounds of light.In them, light sparkles, bounces, glows, splinters and plays hide and seek amid the complexities of cathedral interiors, Venetian canals, narrow streets, dappled courtyards, open plazas and architectural landmarks of several cities.Light is an actor in his paintings, alternately coy and bold, shining with bravado and peeking out from the shadows.His deft handling of color and value, backed with his solid draftsmanship, give Dmoch’s paintings of familiar landmarks a fresh interpretation.Dmoch especially likes to paint cathedrals. As he says, “I can feel all the mystery of ‘another space’ where we sometimes come, but not spend our lifetime.“Inside these structures we feel small and not so important as we sometime think we are. We can see that incredible, enormous structure, filled with endless lights pouring through a stained-glass window.“For me, light and shadow is a metaphor for the everlasting battle between these two basic elements of human existence. In the contrast between light and darkness lies the secret of every human beginning.”

More of Paul Dmoch’s amazing paintings can be found at https://www.grandmastersfineart.com/paul-dmoch.html and at http://linesandcolors.com/2015/02/17/paul-dmoch/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Léa Roche

After having long painted in traditional way, in oil, acrylic or watercolor, French artist Léa Roche turned her talent into a modern and very contemporary mix of urban and pop style.Roche invented her own brand and working technique under the name of ‘FuzzzyArt’.An artist with a passion for colors and technology, she is inspired by her travels, nature, and especially animals, to create unique multicolored paintings full of life.Roche specializes in portraits of animals, with a predilection for cats and felines, but also works with female faces, abstract scenes and other works.Her paintings come alive with bright colors, abstract shapes, and distinct personalities.There is a depth and beauty to Roche’s renditions, a connection of souls, between the artist and her canvas.More of  Léa Roche can be found at https://lea-roche.artmajeur.com/.

 

 

Creative Monday

Creative Monday!

Actually you can say that about any day of the week, depending on the weather, your mood, your itinerary, and your energy level.

Creativity is much more than starting a new painting or designing a new pop-up card. 

But you already know that.

Being creative can mean taking a virtual online tour of magnificent museum slike the British Museum, London, The Guggenheim in Bilbao, in New York, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, or the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. 

Reading is always a step towards creativity. There are milllions of stories out there of people who made history being creative — Steven King, Eleanor Roosevelt, Albert Einstein, Frida Kahlo, Henry VIII, Maya Angelou, Gertrude Stein. History is full of people with creative, interesting, exciting lives. 

One of my favorite ways of expanding my creativity is finding new recipes online. I tire of the hot dog-french fries menu, so I periodically take a stab at foods I’ve always been curious about but too lazy to buy or make. My husband recently learned a smashing egg foo young dish, and I have stepped out of my comfort zone lately to experiment with a classic French Chicken Basquaise and Cuban Ropa Vieja. Cooking is fun, eye-opening, and very rewarding.

I have also been listening to different kinds of background music while I craft, write, or walk. Lately I’m into Spanish Guitar music and Ambient Japanese Instrumentals. There are podcasts about nature, astral travel, and who knows what else that can tip your scales one way or another to play in the background.

How else can you be creative without investing all your spare time and spare change?

I’m sure you can come up with dozens of ways to expand your mind. Books from the library, free lectures, arts and crafts classes, wine and painting parties — the list is endless. There are crafting challenges and writing challenges and cooking challenges all over Word Press and Pinterest and Facebook — there’s always something to pique your interest.

There is no such thing as being bored in this universe.

All you have to do is take the first step. Make the effort to learn something new or hone a craft you’ve been tinkering with. 

 I haven’t been writing lately (except for blogs), and the itch is almost becoming unbearable. I want to write about “visiting” Paris and its countryside for a while now, which takes research research research. That’s exploring to me. That’s creativity in yet another form.

Creative Monday.

A chance to start again, to continue, to excel and fly and explore.

Take advantage of this opportunity you’ve been given. And spread it out all throughout the week.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Natalia Goncharova

Natalia Goncharova was a Russian avant-garde artist, paintercostume designer, writer, illustrator, and set designer, born in Tula, Russia.In 1892, her family moved to Moscow, hoping to improve its financial condition.

While at school, Goncharova developed an interest in history, zoology, and botany but eventually decided to pursue art, enrolling at the Moscow Institute of Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture in 1898.Initially preoccupied with icon painting and the primitivism of ethnic Russian folk-art, Goncharova soon began to mix Cubist and Futurist elements in her work, which led to the beginnings of Cubo-Futurism.From an influential, wealthy, and musical family, the artist’s own interests lay with Russia’s rural workers and by seeming contradiction, with a cast of otherworldly characters.Through repetitive everyday tasks, Goncharova observed the same celestial strength more commonly associated with religious figures, and in this sense merged the realms of heaven and earth in her pictures.She was a founding member of both the Jack of Diamonds (1909–1911), Moscow’s first radical independent exhibiting group, the more radical Donkey’s Tail (1912–1913), and with Larionov invented Rayonism (1912–1914).  The decorative, stylized quality of this work reflects Goncharova’s interest in the folk arts and religious icons of her native Russia.Goncharova emerged as an important and also a highly controversial figure, often breaking social conventions as well as rigid cultural dogmas.More of Natalia Goncharova’s colorful work can be found at http://Natalia Goncharova  and https://www.artst.org/natalia-goncharova/.

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Carolynda MacDonald

 

Carolynda MacDonald is a painter with a Bachelor of Science Honours in Biological Science, and a Fellowship from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Sciences with The Special Examination in Bacteriology from Paddington College of Technology, London.When it comes to her paintings, though, her explanations seem to come from a totally different direction.According to MacDonald, her paintings occupy an analogous realm, operating in a space reminiscent of daydreams or areas of quietude within the mind.She tries to bring together both landscape and still life painting in ways not normally encountered. In an increasingly busy and confusing world, MacDonald feels it is important to find solace for the soul, whether it is in art, music or literature, and her paintings are her way of contributing.Her paintings imply a stillness which is integral to the whole and provides a tranquil space for thought and reflection.MacDonald often chooses a bird to rise up in symbolic celebration of finding oneself in such a place or state of mind.More of Carolynda MacDonald‘s ethereal paintings can be found at http://www.carolyndamacdonald.com/ and https://www.tathagallery.com/artist/carolynda-macdonald.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Ruby Silvious

 

Ruby Silvious is a Philippines-born, US-based artist who has found an ingenious way to regenerate used tea bags into stunningly intricate works of art.She draws, paints, prints and collages moody, evocative and sometimes whimsical art on used teabag paper.Silvious attended Art Print Residency in Arenys de Munt, a municipality in Catalonia, Spain.While at the printmaking residency, she found time each evening to paint a used tea bag, usually inspired by random activities or places she had explored that day.By the end of her stay, she had amassed several used tea bags and a small, intimate collection of miniature paintings.In 2015 she started a project called 363 Days of Tea, a visual daily record of her impression of the moment, using the emptied-out tea bag as her canvas, and altering it to create a new work of art every day for 363 days.Silvious wants viewers to keep an open mind and think beyond the boundaries of what they may consider traditional art.“It seems to me that even non-tea drinkers are fascinated with my work. Maybe it’s because it’s just a unique canvas,” she reflects.More of Ruby Silvious’ ingenious paintings can be found at https://www.rubysilvious.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Richard Savoie

Richard Savoie is a Quebec painter born in Moncton New Brunswick.

Savoie comes from a family of artists, including an uncle who is part of Canada’s National Gallery.

Savoie is known for his beautiful oil paintings of winter landscapes and urban environments.

The subjects of his paintings become part of the mystery as they slowly walk further into the distance with their back turned on the narrator.

Many of his works specializes in frosty winters bursting with light, even if depicted in the middle of the night.

Savoie astonishes with an impeccable visual memory, a skill with which he paints and, in turn, places the viewer at the exact place and time as experienced by the artist himself.

Each work reveals another fragment of the universe in a tapestry of light and color that allows viewers to savor the finesse of his fresh and spontaneous approach.

Richard Savoie‘s work can be found in major galleries throughout Canada and is also part of some of the country’s most important collections.

You can also find his work at https://balcondart.com/en/savoie-richard/.

 

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery (midweek) — Nenad Vasic


I am in quite a quandary about sharing art from an artist that may or may not exist.
Sometimes appreciating art and a specific artist leaves you nothing but a name and an image. So it is with artist Nenad Vasic.

All I could find on him was that he is from Kladovo, Serbia. I could find no history, no profile, no personal thoughts on his life or artistic journey.

I don’t even know if his work is personal or the result of some computer generation. But unique art is unique art no matter what, isn’t it?I was drawn to Vasic’s colorful style which I call “modernistic electric painting.”

His offbeat style of separate lines to display buildings, scenery, and portraits is unusual and different. Whether digital art, hand-painted originals, or printmaking, his work puts a fresh modern and futuristic touch on classic scenes.Sometimes to appreciate art you need to let go of the personal and just let the moment of color or shape or texture assault your senses.So, for now, that is how it is with Vasic’s art.More of Nenad Vasic’s unique art can be found at https://nenad-vasic.pixels.com/ and at https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/nenad-vasic.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Beatriz Hidalgo de la Garza

 

Beatriz Hidalgo de la Garza is a Mexican painter, architect, wife, humanist, mother, and above all … Proudly Mexican.Hidalgo was born in 1967 in southern Mexico. She graduated from TIBA University of Painting and Fine Arts, where she studied the art of drawing with pastels and charcoal. The desire  to transfer the beauty of the world around her to the canvas encouraged Hidalgo to develop a brilliant career, first as an architect and then as an artist.Hidalgo portrays all feelings for Mexico and its people in her never-ending project “Soul of Mexico.”Her secret of creating beautiful art lies in the deep love and respect she has for her people and her country.“Everything I paint has a story to be told when those eyes of the soul come to listen,” Hidalgo shares.Indeed, the beauty of the children, the old people, and the country, is reflected in every brush stroke.

More of Beatriz Hidalgo de la Garza’s amazing paintings can be found at https://www.facebook.com/Beatriz-Hidalgo-De-la-Garza/  or https://www.tuttartpitturasculturapoesiamusica.com/2010/12/beatriz-hidalgo-de-la-garza.html. 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Frederic Sackrider Remington

 

Frederic Sackrider Remington (1861-1909) was an American painter, illustrator, sculptor, and writer who specialized in depictions of the Old American West, specifically concentrating on the last quarter of the 19th century American West and images of cowboys, American Indians, and the U.S. Cavalry.A Dash for the Timber

 

Remington studied art at Yale University (1878–80) and briefly at the Art Students League of New York. Thereafter he devoted himself primarily to illustrative work.A Cold Morning on the Range

 

In the years between his schooling, he traveled widely, spending much time west of the Mississippi River, and he made a specialty of depicting Native Americanscowboys, soldiers, horses, and other aspects of life on the plains.The Emigrants

 

On those trips he sketched and photographed continuously, amassing material to take back to and work from in his studio in New York City.The Hunters Supper

 

During the 1880s and ’90s many of Remington’s illustrations were printed in such popular magazines as Harper’s Weekly and Scribner’s Magazine.The Trooper

 

During the Spanish-American War he was a war correspondent and artist. Remington was primarily a reporter, recording the image of the thing seen; his work is notable for its rendering of swift action and its accuracy of detail.The Apaches

 

More of Frederic Remington‘s inspirational paintings can be found at https://www.frederic-remington.org.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Franz Marc

Franz Marc (1880-1916) was a German print maker and artist.He not only had an influence on art during his time, but was considered to be one of the key figures of the Expressionist movement in Germany.Influences such as Fauvism, Cubism and Impressionism all impacted on the way in which Franz Marc created form. After early experiments with Naturalism and Realism, Marc later eschewed those styles in favor of the greater symbolic potential of abstraction.He is most famous for his images of brightly colored animals, especially horses, which he used to convey profound messages about humanity, the natural world, and the fate of mankind.Color was extremely important for Marc. Not only did he understand the potential for color to affect mood, he developed a specific theory of color symbolism.Franz Marc spent time analyzing the use of color within art history. He then formulated a method of color for his own work.Blue tones would symbolize strength and masculinity, yellows for the feminine side, and red with the physical and violent modern world.More of Franz Marc‘s beautiful art can be found at http://www.franzmarc.org/.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Shirley Quaid

A child of Oklahoma, Shirley Quaid has lived in numerous states as an adult,  but the trail always led back to home, Oklahoma.Her early upbringing on her grandfather’s farm in her formative years had a great influence on her work.Shirley began painting after her children were raised and had her first studio in the back of her husband’s offices in Wewoka, Oklahoma.Her childhood fascination with all things in the 1880’s fueled her eventual concentration on Western Art.She is fascinated with the spirit of living beings, both human and not,  and is happily surprised and delighted when she can reveal their life’s light in her work.Rural Oklahoma called her back in 2016 where she can be found on a daily basis in her studio happily painting images of the people of the American frontier in a representation style.More of Shirley Quaid’s amazing work can be found at https://www.shirleyquaid.com/

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Amy Giacomelli 

Amy Giacomelli started her career in art in 1988 by joining the Entertainment Industry union as a mural artist.Over the years she has painted countless murals and backdrops for studios such as Disney, CBS and Warner Bros., as well as lots of independent shops.Her colorful gallery includes cats, birds, flowers, dogs, landscapes, and other subjects that burst with color and imagination.For Amy, color is at the core of her style.She does a fabulous job of conveying emotion and movement through vibrant shades, well mixed to create bright and beautiful pieces.Often depicting nature, her work draws inspiration from real life, while translating it into more abstract expression..With a background in painting murals, it should be no surprise that Amy enjoys large pieces, sometimes broken up into multi panel works..More of Amy Giacomelli’s work can be found at https://amy-giacomelli.pixels.com/ and https://www.etsy.com/shop/AmyGiacomelli

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Mark Messersmith

 

Mark Messersmith (1955-)  was born in Kansas City, Missouri lives and works in Tallahassee, Florida where he teaches at Florida State University.

The artist extends beyond the frame of his central images surveying man’s ruin. He also includes a small frieze of vignettes at the bottom and sculptural adornments at the frame’s edge.

His work explores themes of spirit and struggle within the modern world’s natural environments.

Messersmith likes to focus on the habitats of Florida’s animals in the way they live and react to one another.

In his words, “My work is really about our relationship to all other living creatures at this precarious moment, a place midway between hope and despair.”

His works reflect plants and animals, which are still able to survive,  often in small isolated natural habitats, and the effects of their inevitable forced migration, dislocation, or isolation.

His works build on stories (either real or conjectured), along with observations and concerns for the creatures that move within the shrinking environs they inhabit.

More of Mark Messersmith‘s inspirational work can be found at https://markmessersmith.com.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery (flashback) — Svetlana Bobrova

I think one of my favorite Sunday Evening Art Gallery posts was from back in November, 2014, when I shared images from the artist Svetlana Bobrova. A surrealistic artist from Russia, the figures in her paintings are hauntingly beautiful. I cannot get enough of her and her imagination.

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can see more of Svetlana Bobrova‘s amazing work at my Sunday Evening Art Gallery blog or at the blue link above.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn

Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (1606-1669) was a Dutch draughtsman, painter, and printmaker.

An innovative and prolific master, he is generally considered one of the greatest visual artists in the history of art and the most important in Dutch art history.Rembrandt’s works depict a wide range of style and subject matter, from portraits and self-portraits to landscapes, genre scenes, allegorical and historical scenes, and biblical and mythological themes.Rembrandt’s portraits of his contemporaries, self-portraits, and scenes from the Bible are regarded as his greatest creative triumphs.Rembrandt’s foremost contribution in the history of printmaking was his transformation of the etching process from a relatively new reproductive technique into a true art form.He was also an avid art collector and dealer. Rembrandt lived beyond his means, buying art, prints, and rarities, which probably helped his bankruptcy in 1656, by selling most of his paintings and large collection of antiquities which included Old Master paintings and drawings, busts of the Roman Emperors, suits of Japanese armor, and collections of natural history and minerals.Unfortunately, the end of his life was far from the famous painter he would become.Rembrandt died in 1669 in Amsterdam and was buried as a poor man in an unknown grave in the Westerkerk. After twenty years, his remains were taken away and destroyed, as was customary with the remains of poor people at the time.

More of Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn’s amazing life and art can be found at http://www.rembrandtpainting.net/ and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rembrandt.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — James Michalopoulos

Painter and sculptor James Michalopoulos was born in 1951 in Pennsylvania. Michalopoulos received a BA from Bowdoin College. After managing the Boston Food Co-op for two years, he began to sketch. He has never stopped making art.

In 1981 he was drawn to New Orleans as the last bastion of hippie bohemian culture in America.He began sketching artists and musicians, houses and street corners.Fascinated with the duality of beauty and decay, the architecture of the city became his muse.Capturing the spirit and the essence of his subject in layer upon layer of thick impasto paint, a portrait of the city appeared, brimming with color and energy.In the early 1990’s Michalopoulos operated a studio out of Lausanne, Switzerland, and exhibited both there and in Geneva, London and Berlin. Today he divides his time between New Orleans and Burgundy.The French countryside, with its Roman era stone buildings and verdant fields, has become a large focus of his work, but there is nothing better than New Orleans.

More of James Michalopoulos‘  wonderful art can be found at https://www.michalopoulos.com/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get Creative and Share!

Grandkids Get Creative

Today — Every day — is for sharing. Sometimes I’m not up to it, other days I’m buzzing around like a bee with pollen. Today is a pollen day.

I’d like to share some of my blogger friends’ finished artwork. I enjoy following them, and I really appreciate their efforts to bring beauty into the world. I know I might miss some, but that share is for another day. Take a look — follow the links — and enjoy their work for yourself.

 

https://dailyfiberfun.wordpress.com/

 

https://friendlyfairytales.com/

Seeing the same four walls
in this endless
pandemic confinement,
but imagining far fields……………

 

https://ivors20.wordpress.com/

There must be a number of silent masks around

Yesterday an old mask flew away at the speed of sound

From behind, the real pieces of what we perceive……………

 

https://gwenniesgardenworld.wordpress.com/

 

https://chaoticshapes.com/

 

https://anthonygrootelaar.blog/

 

https://rakupottery.ca/

 

https://leafandtwig.wordpress.com/

the flowers’ shadows
write their own poem
on the book’s pages

 

https://brushparkwatercolors.wordpress.com/

 

https://thelonelyauthorblog.com/

i will love you
in the silence of your reflection
in the echoes of your pain………………………….

 

https://rothpoetry.wordpress.com/

Painting // passing time
Waiting for Summer release
Ready for a hug

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Christine Van Sickle

Christine Van Sickle‘s creative journey started in the early 1990’s. In 1994 she had her first art piece published in the Green Bay Press Gazette, and from then on she was hooked.Van Sickle has always loved the creative process, and later in life it became a much needed escape from the daily stresses of life.Van Sickle’s work includes realism and surrealism pieces. They are often nature inspired,  and  usually start as a normal landscape or animal.She has worked with ink, watercolor, and other mediums, but prefers acrylic on canvas.The artist makes a point to listen and watch other artists. She also encourages others to pick up a brush and try it themselves.

More of Christine Van Sickle‘s artwork can be found at www.cvansicklestudios.com, or her Instagram page https://www.instagram.com/cvansicklestudios/. 

Send inquiries (custom, original art, or print requests) to cvansickle16@gmail.com.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Giovanni Paolo Panini

Giovanni Paolo Panini (1691-1765), a Piacenza-born artist, was a celebrated painter of views of modern and ancient Rome and a prolific architect and draftsman during the eighteenth century.As both painter and teacher, Panini was versatile in his craft and, accordingly, was highly respected for his contribution to the art scene in Italy.Although Panini worked as an architect, designing Cardinal Valenti’s villa and the chapel in Santa Maria della Scala (1728), and produced fireworks, festival apparatuses, and other ephemeral architectural decorations (and painted magnificent records of them), in the last thirty years of his life he specialized in painting the views of Rome that secured his lasting reputation.These were of two main types, vedute prese da i luoghi (carefully and accurately rendered views of actual places) and vedute ideate (imaginary views and combinations of particular buildings and monuments).His views of ancient and modern Rome encompassed practically everything worth noting in the eighteenth-century guidebooks to the Eternal City.

These paintings were not idealized or symbolic representations of Rome’s past and present grandeur, but accurate and objective portrayals of the most famous, most picturesque, or most memorable sights of the city.

More of Giovanni Paolo Panini‘s amazing paintings can be found at museums and websites around the Internet.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Jacob Lawrence

The most widely acclaimed African American artist of this century, and one of only several whose works are included in standard survey books on American art, Jacob Armstead Lawrence has enjoyed a successful career for more than fifty years.Lawrence was born in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in 1917. The son of Southern migrants, he moved with his mother and sister to Harlem in 1930 at age 13.Lawrence’s paintings portray the lives and struggles of African Americans, and have found wide audiences due to their abstract, colorful style and universality of subject matter.He create paintings drawn from the African American experience as well as historical and contemporary themes, such as war, religion, and civil rights.

In 1940, he received a grant from the Rosenwald Foundation to create a 60-panel epic, The Migration of the Negro (now known as The Migration Series).

The panels portray the migration of over a million African Americans from the South to industrial cities in the North between 1910 and 1940. 

He was credited with developing a unique aesthetic known as Dynamic Cubism, which would be attributed, not to European influences, but to “hard, bright, brittle” Harlem.

More of Jacob Lawrence‘s artwork can be found around the Internet including MOMA Lawrence and  Artnet Lawrence.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Colin Fraser

Colin Fraser is a contemporary Scottish painter known for his detailed still life, landscapes, and interiors.

Fraser has long been established as one of the world’s leading egg tempera painters.

Born in 1957 in Glasgow, United Kingdom, he studied art at Brighton Polytechnic before moving to Sweden in 1981.Fraser’s use of egg-tempera gives his work a light-filled, translucent quality unequaled in other mediums.It is notoriously hard to control and seldom used by contemporary artists.“It’s a medium fraught with technical difficulties, but therein lies its charm. Brushstrokes dry instantly and are never really fully opaque, so just about every mark the painter makes shows,” Fraser has explained.