Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Jenny Foster

Growing up in a small town on the Colorado River in Arizona, Jenny Foster gravitated toward art at an early age.Foster studied fine art at Arizona State University and graduated with a degree in graphic design.Her style is both primitive and contemporary, and she delivers it with a combination of abstract shapes and happy colors and symbols.To many artists, it is a great challenge to express feelings of personality in their art without injecting some realism.But Foster has mastered the art enough to do this through symbols and abstract forms.Foster’s works are inspired by her appreciation of nature, happy colors, and the spirit of life.The artist lets her palette and brush express her imagination.She prefers to achieve quality without adding too much detail or sophistication, keeping everything simple and fresh.

More of Jenny Foster’s inspirational artwork can be found at  http://jennyfoster.com/.

 

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Emily Kame Kngwarreye

Emily Kame Kngwarreye (or Emily Kam Ngwarray) (1910 – 1996) was an Aboriginal Australian artist from the Utopia community in the Northern Territory of Australia.She is one of the most prominent and successful artists in the history of Australian art.Her remarkable work was inspired by her cultural life as an Anmatyerre elder, and her lifelong custodianship of the women’s Dreaming sites in her clan Country, Alhalkere.Kngwarreye began painting on canvas in her late seventies after decades of ritual artistic activity and batik fabric painting.Unlike most desert painters at the time, Kngwarreye did not use stylized representations of animal tracks or concentric circles in her designs.Instead, she employed richly layered brushstrokes or dabs throughout her abstract compositions.Her free handling of paint using various implements, keen sense of color, and dynamic compositions earned her international fame.It was in Alhalkere that the essence of her being resided, and it was her Dreaming that was the source of the creative power, of her knowledge.So profound was her identification with Alhalkere that it infused her life and her belief system, and governed her kinship relations and connections with other people.More of  Emily Kame Kngwarreye‘s  amazing original works can be found at https://www.wikiart.org/en/emily-kame-kngwarreye and https://artguide.com.au/art-plus/emily-kame-kngwarreye/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Armando Mariño

Armando Mariño is a renowned painter, sculptor and installation artist, and one of the most popular Cuban contemporary artists.Born in Santiago de Cuba, living and working in the U.S., Mariño received his art education at the Pedagogical Institute of Arts from Havana, and the prestigious Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten in Amsterdam.

He is widely praised for his mesmerizing works that offer a unique and sarcastic approach to art as a space of power and exclusion.The imagery in Mariño ’s work is usually part of media reports about everyday social issues like refugees, war, economy crisis, and ecology that he incorporates in his art.

Mariño’s paintings are characterized by his distinctive and highly saturated color palette – bright pinks, oranges, greens and yellows that are offset by deep, dark shadows.

Influenced by periods of time living in the varied landscapes of Cuba, the Netherlands, France and New York’s Hudson Valley, the artist’s large-scale works explore relationships between the figure and the natural environment.

Each of his paintings is build up with multiple layers of a strong, vivid, intense, and fluorescent palette of oil or watercolors.

Indeed, Mariño has described painting as an idea that uses color in order to think.

More of Armando Mariño‘s colorful artwork can be found at http://armandomarino.com/  and https://www.widewalls.ch/artists/armando-marino.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Diana Rosa

Diana Rosa is an established Cuban painter based in Canada, whose works have featured in prizes, publications and exhibitions across North America, the UK and Asia.Influenced by her festive Cuban childhood spent surrounded by an abundance of creative energies, Rosa creates works that reflect her distinctive use of rich exoticism of tropical vegetation.She employs a Naïve Folk-Art style, along with  elements of Cubist and Surrealist schools, to explore questions of identity, love, relationship and environment in our society.

The artist aims to show our relationship to the world around us through the versatile medium of acrylic paint.

She uses sharp brush strokes, contrasting textures, and a variety of acrylic mediums, commenting on our human emotions, mixed realism with fantasy.

Bright and whimsical images with a touch of modernism, Rosa’s  art brings to life thoughts and impressions dancing with imagery.

“I am always fascinated with the human story that all of us are living — often untold, sometimes unrecognized, but always significant,” Rosa shares.“My paintings reflect the natural beauty of human emotions.“They are a bridge from my imagination to theirs, and although the story I mean to tell may differ from what the viewer ultimately takes away, what is most important is that we have shared the tale.”

More of Diana Rosa’s delightful art can be found at https://www.artfinder.com/artist/diana-rosa and https://www.singulart.com/en/artist/diana-rosa-3851

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — John Singer Sargent

John Singer Sargent (January 12, 1856 – April 14, 1925) was the most successful Impressionist painter of his era, as well as a gifted landscape painter and watercolorist.Born in Florence to expatriate American parents,  Sargent received his first formal art instruction at Rome in 1868, and then sporadically attended the Accademia delle Belle Arti in Florence between 1870 and 1873.In 1874 he was accepted at the Paris atelier of the portraitist Emile Auguste Carolus-Duran, and attended drawing classes at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts.Throughout the 1880s, he regularly participated in the Paris Salon — most often, his works were full-length portraits of women, which generally received positively.Sargent’s best portraits expertly reveal the individuality and personality of his sitters.This ability set him apart from others portrait painters of his time—he made the sitter shine on the canvas while capturing the essence of their being.Noted for his dazzling technical virtuosity and painterly technique, he influenced an entire generation of American portraitists. By the turn of the century Sargent was recognized as the most acclaimed international society portraitist of the Edwardian era, and his clientele consisted of the most affluent, aristocratic, and fashionable people of his time.Around 1906 he abandoned portraiture and worked primarily in watercolor, a medium in which he was extraordinarily gifted.More of John Singer Sargent‘s paintings can be found at https://www.johnsingersargent.org/. 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Amy Brown

Amy Brown is one of my all-time favorite artists. I’ve loved her work since I role-played a faerie woman 20 years ago.

Brown has always been interested in fairies, but never considered painting them as a career option until one day her boss asked her to paint something to fill an empty frame that had been sitting around the art gallery where she worked.Brown  asked what she should paint and her boss said,  “I don’t know, paint a fairy or something.”  So she did.It was like the faeries were pushing her to paint their portraits.After selling prints and originals at street fairs and in local shops for a few years, Brown  opened a website and began selling her work online worldwide.The business has since take on a life of its own.Using colors, designs, and background, Brown has truly captured the world and the imagination of the faerie world. Each faerie glows with a personality all their own. “My passion to paint is like a living creature inside me,” Brown said.

“All the ideas in my head churn and beg to get out. I’m driven to get them onto paper and out of my head as soon as possible.” “Once I’ve conjured one creature, another is waiting impatiently for its turn.”

More of Amy Brown‘s magical art can be found at https://amybrownart.com/.

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Kim Tschang-Yeul

 Kim Tschang-Yeul’s most well-known paintings, in which droplets of water appear to protrude from monochromatic canvases, are in fact optical illusions, melding abstraction and figuration. Born in 1929 in the north of the then unified Korea, Tschang-Yeul migrated to the south to escape the communist regime.He subsequently left for New York to pursue his artistic dreams before finally settling in Paris in 1969.There, he began to nurture, over a period of forty years, a unique motif: the drop of water.This motif stems from traditions of Eastern philosophy, acting both as a therapy for the artist’s traumatic memories and a meditation on eternity.“My water drop paintings are accomplished under the encounters of my life experiences and my plasticizing experiences,” Tschang-Yeul explains.“Each clear, impeccable water drop is in its initial state since purification, as if it is a recurrence of absolute nothingness; the water drop is also what it finally returns to.” More of Kim Tschang-Yeul’s  wonderfully unique paintings can be found at Tina Kim Gallery and Artnet. 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Oscar-Claude Monet

Oscar-Claude Monet (1840-1926), born in Paris, was raised on the Normandy coast in Le Havre, where his father sold ships’ provisions.Banks of the Seine, Vétheuil

He gained a local reputation as a caricaturist while still a teenager, and landscape painter Eugène Boudin invited the budding artist to accompany him as he painted scenes at the local beaches.Chrysanthemums

Monet went to Paris in 1862 to study painting and there befriended fellow students Auguste Renoir, Alfred Sisley, and Frédéric Bazille, who would later form the core group of the original impressionists.The Cliff-at Etretat Sunset

By the end of the 1860s Monet had largely abandoned ambitious, large-scale figurative painting in favor of smaller, spontaneous landscape works executed en plein air.The Water Lily Pond

Monet fled to London during the Franco-Prussian War, and in late 1871 settled at Argenteuil, a suburb just west of Paris, which soon became known as the hub of impressionist painting.Boats on the Beach at Etretat

Financial difficulties forced Monet to relocate to Vétheuil in 1878, and a few years later, in 1883, he settled in Giverny, where he would live for the rest of his life.Water Lilies

Executed outdoors, he employed seemingly spontaneous brushstrokes to capture the ever-changing effects of light and atmosphere.Woman with a Parasol

In the 1880s Monet expanded his motifs, turning his attention both to the Mediterranean and to the rugged vistas along the Normandy coast.View of Le Havre

In the 1890s he undertook a number of paintings produced in series, including pictures of poplars, grainstacks, and Rouen Cathedral; each work captured a specific atmospheric effect and time of day..Haystack

More of Claude Monet‘s magical paintings can be found at https://www.claudemonetgallery.org/ and https://www.claude-monet.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Arnau Alemany

Arnau Alemany was born in Barcelona in 1948, at the foot of a hill in one of those neighborhoods that have grown in an anarchic way, without order or planning.Up the mountain in a range that imprisons the city, buildings were built in unusual places with difficult access, creating an unusual urban complex, close to nonsense.Alemany is Spain’s foremost painter of surrealistic environments and industrialized cities of the past/future, and is recognized worldwide as one of today’s leading surrealists. He conceives his work as an effort to challenge the viewer, not to leave him indifferent, be it for better or for worse.The artist creates imaginary urban landscapes, either with signs of destruction or general abandonment, which he hopes will show that visual surprise is possible through the use of magical realism.With the security of long years of drawing, graphic, pictorial and sculptural training, Alemany works to elaborate plausible and unreal landscapes.In his world, non-existent cityscapes with a perfect geometry and coherence in their individual elements, impossible to achieve in the real work, form what he calls an “imperfect landscape”.Surreal or not, his art makes us wish we could visit his world in person.

More of Arnau Alemany‘s amazing landscapes can be found at http://www.arnaualemany.com/. 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Viktor Schramm

Viktor Schramm (1865-1929) was a Romanian painter and illustrator.He was a member of the Munich School, an association of artists either active in Munich or who had studied at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste München.Schramm’s paintings offer an intimate and staged glimpse into the everyday life of the upper middle class.His oil paintings are characterized by a special devotion and sensitivity to materiality and décor.Schramm not only staged the intimacy of the presented moment, but also created a detailed description of the bourgeois salon, which was characterized by its stimulations of touch and motion.Among other things, Schramm’s specialty was depicting elegantly dressed young women.The artist was able to capture the texture and light of dress fabrics and the play of colors over the silk.Information across the Internet is scarce, but more on Viktor Schramm can be found at https://areaofdesign.com/viktor-schramm/.

 

 

Artists Are My Friends

 

I know I’ve shared my friend Carsten Weiland‘s watercolors before — there is something about the rough strokes and hues of his paintings — especially mansions and landscapes — that bring an authenticity to all his work.

I used to live in a Second Empire home/mansion — a beautiful bed and breakfast in a small town. Times as they were, after eight years it was too hard to keep the business profitable. It was with a bittersweet sigh that we sold it and moved on. A wise and positive decision.

But Carsten’s paintings bring back the days of mansard roofs, balustrades, and stained glass windows, a delightful memory on a winter’s eve.

Do stroll through his website some time — it will be well worth your wandering.

Weathered Mansions in Watercolors

https://brushparkwatercolors.wordpress.com/

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Salman Khoshroo

Iranian painter Salman Khoshroo uses a palette knife and sizable layers of paint to create the emotive portraits in his recent series, “White on White.”In contrast to his previous work that relied on swirling reds, blues, and yellows, Khoshroo’s latest impasto pieces are monochromatic.Starting with a hunk of paint, the artist then forms the portrait’s outline before shaping the rest of the face that lacks distinct physical features.Viewers can follow his creative process step-by-step by looking at the edges of each stroke.Khoshroo hopes to capture a human spark with minimal intervention and create portraits of people that make you feel something, people you didn’t even know you were looking for.Painted with a single pigment in a sandbox method, these faces are the result of taking a chunk of paint and molding it.It is amazing that one can see so many features in such few movements.

More of Salman Khoshroo‘s diverse art can be found at http://salmankhoshroo.com/ and https://www.ignant.com/2019/12/30/a-portrait-of-anonymity-salman-khoshroo-molds-emotive-faces-from-smeared-paint/

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Tia Crystal

A Visionary Artist, Jewelry Designer, and Energy Healer, Tia Crystal always knew there would be a deeper meaning to her life.Some of the most valuable expressions under the umbrella  of “Spiritual Art”  relates to the inclusion of crystals, spiritual quotes,  and affirmations woven into the art.Crystal has long attracted a select and international circle of collectors, drawn by her organic style and enchanting persona.Years ago, a vision came to her in a dream guiding her to Italy. In response, and with complete trust, she left to embark on a journey that would have a profound life changing impact on her.While walking in silence in the countryside of Assisi, Tia stumbled upon an old paintbrush lying under a bush. Next to it, there was a bottle lid with a T on it.Everything within her told her to pay attention to the message  of these discoveries, and so began her journey of creating Art that leaves one not only mesmerized but intoxicated with inner and outer peace.Crystal’s work is unmatched in its color’s, scope, variety, and deep spiritual meaning.More of Tia Crystal‘s magical art can be found at https://tiacrystal.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — William Blake

William Blake (1757-1827) was a English Romantic painter, printmaker,  poet, and radical visionary who expressed his mystical views through paintings, engravings, and poetry.

Isaac Newton

 

Born in London into a working-class family with strong nonconformist religious beliefs, Blake first studied art as a boy, at the drawing academy of Henry Pars.

Jacob’s Ladder

 

He served a five-year apprenticeship with the commercial engraver James Basire before entering the Royal Academy Schools as an engraver at the age of twenty-two.

The Angels Hovering Over the Body of Christ in the Sepulchre

 

Although William completed much of his commercial work in line engraving, for his own projects he used his skills as an engraver to expand on the traditions of “stereotype” (a 16th century process whereby a metal cast is made of a wooded engraving) and created a new procedure called relief etching.

The marriage of Heaven and Hell

 

Yet Blake was the archetypal romantic painter, always depicting his subjects in heightened colors and scenes.

The Red Dragon and the Woman Clothed with the Sun

 

He was a master of allegory and often raised eyebrows and even ire by his choice of expression.

The Ghost of a Flea

 

Although the majority of his early work was inspired by religious or classical figures, much of his later art was fuel by his inner landscape and informed by his religious visions. 

Archangel Raphael with Adam and Eve

 

Many of his contemporaries considered him quite mad as he readily spoke about his visions and fantasies with people and it was common knowledge among the artistic community of the day. 

The Temptation and Fall of Eve

 

Whatever his inspiration, William Blake has left a legacy of poetry and paintings behind.

The Ancient of Days

 

More of William Blake’s wonderfully imaginative paintings can be found at http://www.williamblake.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Viktor Mikhailovich Zundalev

 

Mikhailovich Zundalev is one of those artists that have very little personal information online, yet whose paintings bring a warm, fresh feeling to the heart.Zundalev was born in 1953 in Ryzan, Russia.After graduating from the Art School named after G. K. Wagner, Zundalev began painting colorful flower arrangements. According to his scant biography, he paints, participates in exhibitions,  and at the same time works as an artist for many years in the Art Fund of the city of Kaluga.In 1989, he was admitted to the Union of Artists of the USSR.His paintings are textured, colorful, and full of life. One can only dream of having one of his vased bouquets  in the center of their table.

Zundalev may or not be an actual painter, but his works reflect the beauty of light and scent and nature.

Viktor Mikhailovich Zundalev‘s lovely paintings can be found scattered throughout the Internet, including ArtNow .

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Lady Pink

Whether portraying women as provocative street warriors in the concrete jungle or as mythical goddesses placed in surrealist environments, Lady Pink, the long-reigning queen of graffiti, consistently elevates the female figure through her murals and paintings by incorporating themes of fantasy, spiritualism, her South American heritage, and indigenous iconography.Lady Pink was born Sandra Fabara in Ecuador in 1964 and raised in New York City.She started making graffiti at the age of 15 and quickly became well known as the only prominent female in the graffiti subculture.Pink’s beginning focus was on painting subway trains.She had first solo exhibition at 21 and her paintings are included in important collections like the MET, The Whitney Museum, The Museum of the City of N.Y. and others.Pink has gone great lengths to fight for equality, justice, and women’s rights.She expresses her private opinion to public work, without any censors, although she never reveals the idea in fullness.She cleverly states out what is important, and warmly put her artwork open to interpretation.Pink’s  tradition is to practice mindfulness and to be as sensible as possible to the community.“Art is about a binary relationship, and the audience is free to make assumptions and interpretations as they like,” she says about her work.More of Lady Pink‘s murals and paintings can be found at https://www.ladypinknyc.com/.

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Erin Hanson

 

Combining the emotional resonance of 19th-century Impressionists with the lavish color palette of Expressionism, Erin Hanson’s unique style has come to be known as “Open Impressionism.”Erin Hanson began painting as a young girl, voraciously learning oils, acrylics, watercolor, pen and ink, pastels, and life drawing from accomplished art instructors. She began commissioning paintings at age ten, and by age twelve, she was employed after school by a mural studio, learning the techniques of acrylics on the grand scale of forty-foot canvases. Graduating high school at age sixteen and once again demonstrating that she was a child prodigy, Hanson next attended UC Berkeley, excelling further in her studies and creative development and attaining a degree in Bioengineering.Two years later, a high school scholarship took her to Otis College of Art, where she immersed herself in figure drawing.After graduating from college, Hanson entered the art trade as a professional, inspired by landscapes and vantage points only beheld by the most adventurous.For the past decade Hanson has been developing a unique, minimalist technique of placing impasto paint strokes without layering, which has become known as “Open-Impressionism.”Her passion for natural beauty is seen in her work as she transforms vistas familiar and rare into stunning interpretations of bold color, playful rhythms and raw emotional impact. “I am not trying to re-create a photograph, I am trying to get my viewers to open their eyes and see their world a little differently,” Hanson said.More of Erin Hanson’s imaginative paintings can be found at https://www.erinhanson.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Wawiriya Burton

Wawiriya Burton is an Australian Aboriginal artist known for her acrylic paintings.

Burton belongs to the Pitjantjatjara, an Aboringinal people of the Central Australian desert near Uluru.She was born in outback central Australia sometime during the 1920s, and grew up living a traditional, nomadic way of life.

She originally specialized in baskets and punu (wood carvings) from spinifex (a  perennial coastal plant) at the Tjala Arts Centre in Southern Australia in 2008, but later learned to paint from other women.

Her paintings are representations of sacred stories from the Dreamtime.Like other Aboriginal artists, the representations are blurred (or encrypted) for cultural reasons.The full meaning of her artworks can only be understood or deciphered by people who have been initiated.Burton is a ngangkaṟi (traditional healer), so she has more knowledge about sacred traditions than most in her community.

More of Wawiriya Burton‘s soul filled paintings can be found at Wikipedia and Aboriginal Signature.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Pablo Picasso

Pablo Ruiz Picasso (1881 – 1973) was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, and theatre designer who spent most of his adult life in France.

The Old Guitarist

 

Regarded as one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture, the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore.

Guernica

 

Picasso demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a naturalistic manner through his childhood and adolescence.

Family of Saltimbanques

 

During the first decade of the 20th century, his style changed as he experimented with different theories, techniques, and ideas.

Girl before a Mirror

 

After 1906, the Fauvist work of the slightly older artist Henri Matisse motivated Picasso to explore more radical styles, beginning a fruitful rivalry between the two artists, who subsequently were often paired by critics as the leaders of modern art.

Three Musicians

 

Much of Picasso’s work of the late 1910s and early 1920s is in a neoclassical style, and his work in the mid-1920s often has characteristics of Surrealism.

Gertrude Stein

 

His later work often combines elements of his earlier styles.

The Weeping Woman

 

Exceptionally prolific throughout the course of his long life, Picasso achieved universal renown and immense fortune for his revolutionary artistic accomplishments, and became one of the best-known figures in 20th-century art.

Picasso Statue, Chicago

 

More of Pablo Picasso’s wonderful art can be found at https://www.pablopicasso.org/ and http://www.picasso.com/.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Olaf Wieghorst

Olaf Carl Wieghorst (1899-1988) was born in Viborg, Denmark, and is known for his Western genre, Indian, cowboy, and horse paintings.

El Dorado

 

During his career, Wieghorst learned to master oil painting and watercolor painting, as well as numerous other art mediums.

Break Away

 

After three years of service with the Fifth Cavalry along the Mexican border, Wieghorst was mustered out of the military in 1922, and pursued the life of a cowboy, during which he wandered extensively throughout the Southwest, sketching whenever he could.

His Spotted Pony

 

In 1924, Wieghorst joined the New York City Police Department where he became a Mounted Police Officer with the Department.

Turning the Remuda

 

Due to his knowledge of horses, he was quickly sent to the Remount Section of the Mounted Unit where he broke and trained horses for the Unit.

Salt River Canyon

 

Olaf’s drawing and etchings have been displayed at the Madison Square Garden Rodeo and in the Rodeo’s Official Magazine.

Roping the Dunn

 

From 1938 to 1953, Olaf’s art was also featured on the covers of a Rodeo magazine published in Tucson Arizona titled “Hoofs and Horns.”

Wagon and Remuda

 

After retiring and moving to El Cajon Olaf settled down to paint, steadily gaining recognition for his classic cowboy and Indian subjects and became a master painter of the western scene.

Drifting

 

Wherever he went, he sketched and painted the Western culture he loved.

Comanche

 

Olaf was honored at the National Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City on November 15, 1974 for his contribution to Western Art.

Changing Outfits

 

More of Olaf Wieghorst‘s remarkable Western Art can be found at https://www.wieghorst.com.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Leslie Cobb

Leslie Cobb has shared her life with cats since she was a child and cannot imagine living without them.

Cobb tries to capture their unique qualities in her art.She uses acrylic paint because it washes easily out of cat fur when some of her models choose to take a more active role in the artistic process.Cobb is mostly self-taught; her formal training  limited to high school art classes and a couple of drawing courses at a community college.She began painting in 1998 after the death of her one-eyed cat, Esmeralda.The two had been together for 19 years; Cobb’s early paintings were an effort to honor her memory and cope with her grief.Cobb’s work has been displayed at art galleries, craft fairs and cat shows.She is also the illustrator of “Good St. Dominic’s Cat,” a children’s book by Ed Noonan, and her art appears on the covers of the Crazy Cat Lady mystery series of books by Mollie Hunt.

More of Leslie Cobb’s wonderful cat paintings can be found at http://www.lesliecobb.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Albrecht Dürer

Albrecht Dürer (1471 –1528) was a German painter, printmaker, and theorist of the German Renaissance.

Praying Hands

 

He was a brilliant painter, draftsman, and writer, though his first and probably greatest artistic impact was in the medium of printmaking.

Saint Jerome in his Study

 

Born in Nuremberg, Dürer established his reputation and influence across Europe in his twenties due to his high-quality woodcut prints.

Adam and Eve

 

He was in contact with the major Italian artists of his time, including Raphael and Leonardo da Vinci, and from 1512 was patronized by Emperor Maximilian I.

Portrait of Emperor Maximilian I

 

He believed that geometry was essential for producing harmonic artworks, and thus that it should be taught to all young artists, alongside other mathematical rigors.

Feast of the Rosary

 

Despite his decidedly Renaissance interest in Humanism and mathematics, Dürer continued to produce extremely detailed studies of the natural world, particularly animals, be they newly discovered in Europe (such as the mythical rhinoceros and lion) or common native creatures (such as the hare, owl, or cat).

Young Hare

 

Dürer was well aware of his own artistic genius, which equally tortured and enlivened him.

The Knight Death and the Devil

 

He painted a number of empowering self-portraits, and would often appear as a character in his painted commissions.

Self Portrait

 

More of Albrecht Dürer‘s art can be found at http://www.albrechtdurer.org.

 

 

 

#worldwatercolormonth – Daily watercolor no.02 Carsten Wieland – Dancing Brushes

 

If you find yourself with a free 9-11 minutes, I highly recommend watching Carsten’s videos, starting with this one. This is how a true artist works. He is amazing! And there are more at his website, https://brushparkwatercolors.wordpress.com/.

It is always a delight to watch someone in their element, isn’t it?

 

brushpark-watercolors

Celebrating the #worldwatercolormonth I am going to present a timelapse watercolor painting any day of July from my daily practice. All shown paintings are free improvisations in pure watercolor, done without any preparing sketches – just from the mind to the paper. Painting, music & video by Carsten Wieland, 2021 Using paints from Lukas Aquarell 1862 / @Lukasfarben #CarstenWieland #brushparkwatercolors #wielandfineart

Zur Feier des#worldwatercolormonthwerde ich jeden Tag im Juli ein Zeitraffer-Aquarell aus meiner täglichen Praxis präsentieren. Alle gezeigten Malereien sind freie Improvisationen in purem Aquarell – entstanden ohne vorbereitende Skizzen – einfach vom Kopf aufs Papier. Malerei, Musik und Video: Carsten Wieland, 2021 Ich verwende Farben von Lukas Aquarell 1862 / @Lukasfarben

Free watercolor tutorials:

https://freewatercolortutorials.wordpress.com/

Happy Watercolor How-To eBooks Tutorials step-by-step:

https://www.etsy.com/de/shop/WielandF…

Website:

https://www.wieland-fineart.com/

Watercolor Improvisation – 042_2021 Watercolor/ FABRIANO® “Disegno 5” fine, ca. 70 x 50 cm / 19.7 x 13.8 in / Lukas…

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William Utermohlen — Signs of Alzheimer’s

 

Conversation Pieces, Loyola University Museum of Art, Chicago

This is a little bit Sunday Evening Art Gallery post, a little Humoring the Goddess post. You’ll see what I mean.

I am a sucker for those “10 Things You Didn’t Know About …..” Most of them are flops, but every now and then I come across something that is extraordinary.

 

In 1995, U.K.-based American artist William Utermohlen was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.

1967

 

Before his death, Utermohlen created a heart-wrenching final series of self-portraits over the stages of Alzheimer’s, which lasted roughly five years.

1996

 

The last self-portraits, painted between 1995 and 2001, are unique artistic, medical, and psychological documents. They portray a man doomed yet fighting to preserve his identity and his place in the world in the face of an implacable disease encroaching on his mind and senses. 

1997

 

Alzheimer’s symptoms not only include memory loss or dementia and personality changes but it also affects the part of the brain, which is responsible for visualizing capabilities, so crucial for a painter.

1998

 

With Alzheimer’s progressing, the art becomes visibly more abstract, blurrier and vague, due to the loss of the aforementioned capabilities.

1999

 

The artist’s widow Patricia explains exactly why these images are so powerful:  “In these pictures we see with heart-breaking intensity William’s efforts to explain his altered self, his fears and his sadness.”

2000

 

Apart from portraits, still lives and drawings from the model, Utermohlen’s art can be arranged in six clear thematic cycles: The “Mythological” paintings of 1962-63; the “Cantos” of 1965-1966 inspired by Dante’s Inferno; the “Mummers” cycle of 1969-1970 depicting characters from South Philadelphia’s New Year’s Day parade; the “War” series of 1972 alluding to the Vietnam war; the “Nudes” of 1973-74; and finally the “Conversation Pieces”, the great decorative interiors with figures, of 1989-1991.

William Utermohlen died March 21, 2007. The mere thought that this artist tried to paint his being through the very end of his Alzheimer’s pays tribute to the creative soul in each one of us.

More of William Utermohlen’s story and paintings can be found at Bored Panda and Chris Boïcos Fine Arts websites.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Paul Dmoch

Paul Dmoch is a Belgian painter whose watercolors are playgrounds of light.In them, light sparkles, bounces, glows, splinters and plays hide and seek amid the complexities of cathedral interiors, Venetian canals, narrow streets, dappled courtyards, open plazas and architectural landmarks of several cities.Light is an actor in his paintings, alternately coy and bold, shining with bravado and peeking out from the shadows.His deft handling of color and value, backed with his solid draftsmanship, give Dmoch’s paintings of familiar landmarks a fresh interpretation.Dmoch especially likes to paint cathedrals. As he says, “I can feel all the mystery of ‘another space’ where we sometimes come, but not spend our lifetime.“Inside these structures we feel small and not so important as we sometime think we are. We can see that incredible, enormous structure, filled with endless lights pouring through a stained-glass window.“For me, light and shadow is a metaphor for the everlasting battle between these two basic elements of human existence. In the contrast between light and darkness lies the secret of every human beginning.”

More of Paul Dmoch’s amazing paintings can be found at https://www.grandmastersfineart.com/paul-dmoch.html and at http://linesandcolors.com/2015/02/17/paul-dmoch/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Léa Roche

After having long painted in traditional way, in oil, acrylic or watercolor, French artist Léa Roche turned her talent into a modern and very contemporary mix of urban and pop style.Roche invented her own brand and working technique under the name of ‘FuzzzyArt’.An artist with a passion for colors and technology, she is inspired by her travels, nature, and especially animals, to create unique multicolored paintings full of life.Roche specializes in portraits of animals, with a predilection for cats and felines, but also works with female faces, abstract scenes and other works.Her paintings come alive with bright colors, abstract shapes, and distinct personalities.There is a depth and beauty to Roche’s renditions, a connection of souls, between the artist and her canvas.More of  Léa Roche can be found at https://lea-roche.artmajeur.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Natalia Goncharova

Natalia Goncharova was a Russian avant-garde artist, paintercostume designer, writer, illustrator, and set designer, born in Tula, Russia.In 1892, her family moved to Moscow, hoping to improve its financial condition.

While at school, Goncharova developed an interest in history, zoology, and botany but eventually decided to pursue art, enrolling at the Moscow Institute of Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture in 1898.Initially preoccupied with icon painting and the primitivism of ethnic Russian folk-art, Goncharova soon began to mix Cubist and Futurist elements in her work, which led to the beginnings of Cubo-Futurism.From an influential, wealthy, and musical family, the artist’s own interests lay with Russia’s rural workers and by seeming contradiction, with a cast of otherworldly characters.Through repetitive everyday tasks, Goncharova observed the same celestial strength more commonly associated with religious figures, and in this sense merged the realms of heaven and earth in her pictures.She was a founding member of both the Jack of Diamonds (1909–1911), Moscow’s first radical independent exhibiting group, the more radical Donkey’s Tail (1912–1913), and with Larionov invented Rayonism (1912–1914).  The decorative, stylized quality of this work reflects Goncharova’s interest in the folk arts and religious icons of her native Russia.Goncharova emerged as an important and also a highly controversial figure, often breaking social conventions as well as rigid cultural dogmas.More of Natalia Goncharova’s colorful work can be found at http://Natalia Goncharova  and https://www.artst.org/natalia-goncharova/.

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — David de la Mano

David de la Mano is a Spanish contemporary artist best known for his stunning murals often depicting silhouettes, trees and other monochromatic imagery.Born in Salamanca in 1975, de la Mano has a degree in Fine Art from the University of Salamanca and PhD studies in Public Art from the University of Valencia.

He is known for his minimalist aesthetics while using black and white themes depicting human figures.His large-scale, black and white pieces provoke reactions among the viewers and encourage their emotions and ideas through a minimalist aesthetic.De la Mano is particularly interested by the theme of the link between human beings as a mass which evolves, in groups, as a flow, or the link between human and nature also as a danger or a union.He observes others and their social or anti-social behavior, exploring every corner of both in his practice, using silhouettes of men, women, or the masses as narrative metaphors.Through these figures, he gives poetic visions of the the human condition in society and the ways human perceive the world.

More of David de la Mano‘s imaginative work can be found at and at  https://daviddelamano.blogspot.com and https://bottleneckgallery.com/collections/david-de-la-mano.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Carolynda MacDonald

 

Carolynda MacDonald is a painter with a Bachelor of Science Honours in Biological Science, and a Fellowship from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Sciences with The Special Examination in Bacteriology from Paddington College of Technology, London.When it comes to her paintings, though, her explanations seem to come from a totally different direction.According to MacDonald, her paintings occupy an analogous realm, operating in a space reminiscent of daydreams or areas of quietude within the mind.She tries to bring together both landscape and still life painting in ways not normally encountered. In an increasingly busy and confusing world, MacDonald feels it is important to find solace for the soul, whether it is in art, music or literature, and her paintings are her way of contributing.Her paintings imply a stillness which is integral to the whole and provides a tranquil space for thought and reflection.MacDonald often chooses a bird to rise up in symbolic celebration of finding oneself in such a place or state of mind.More of Carolynda MacDonald‘s ethereal paintings can be found at http://www.carolyndamacdonald.com/ and https://www.tathagallery.com/artist/carolynda-macdonald.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Ruby Silvious

 

Ruby Silvious is a Philippines-born, US-based artist who has found an ingenious way to regenerate used tea bags into stunningly intricate works of art.She draws, paints, prints and collages moody, evocative and sometimes whimsical art on used teabag paper.Silvious attended Art Print Residency in Arenys de Munt, a municipality in Catalonia, Spain.While at the printmaking residency, she found time each evening to paint a used tea bag, usually inspired by random activities or places she had explored that day.By the end of her stay, she had amassed several used tea bags and a small, intimate collection of miniature paintings.In 2015 she started a project called 363 Days of Tea, a visual daily record of her impression of the moment, using the emptied-out tea bag as her canvas, and altering it to create a new work of art every day for 363 days.Silvious wants viewers to keep an open mind and think beyond the boundaries of what they may consider traditional art.“It seems to me that even non-tea drinkers are fascinated with my work. Maybe it’s because it’s just a unique canvas,” she reflects.More of Ruby Silvious’ ingenious paintings can be found at https://www.rubysilvious.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Richard Savoie

Richard Savoie is a Quebec painter born in Moncton New Brunswick.

Savoie comes from a family of artists, including an uncle who is part of Canada’s National Gallery.

Savoie is known for his beautiful oil paintings of winter landscapes and urban environments.

The subjects of his paintings become part of the mystery as they slowly walk further into the distance with their back turned on the narrator.

Many of his works specializes in frosty winters bursting with light, even if depicted in the middle of the night.

Savoie astonishes with an impeccable visual memory, a skill with which he paints and, in turn, places the viewer at the exact place and time as experienced by the artist himself.

Each work reveals another fragment of the universe in a tapestry of light and color that allows viewers to savor the finesse of his fresh and spontaneous approach.

Richard Savoie‘s work can be found in major galleries throughout Canada and is also part of some of the country’s most important collections.

You can also find his work at https://balcondart.com/en/savoie-richard/.

 

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery (midweek) — Nenad Vasic


I am in quite a quandary about sharing art from an artist that may or may not exist.
Sometimes appreciating art and a specific artist leaves you nothing but a name and an image. So it is with artist Nenad Vasic.

All I could find on him was that he is from Kladovo, Serbia. I could find no history, no profile, no personal thoughts on his life or artistic journey.

I don’t even know if his work is personal or the result of some computer generation. But unique art is unique art no matter what, isn’t it?I was drawn to Vasic’s colorful style which I call “modernistic electric painting.”

His offbeat style of separate lines to display buildings, scenery, and portraits is unusual and different. Whether digital art, hand-painted originals, or printmaking, his work puts a fresh modern and futuristic touch on classic scenes.Sometimes to appreciate art you need to let go of the personal and just let the moment of color or shape or texture assault your senses.So, for now, that is how it is with Vasic’s art.More of Nenad Vasic’s unique art can be found at https://nenad-vasic.pixels.com/ and at https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/nenad-vasic.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Norman Rockwell

 

Norman Rockwell, (1894 -1978), was an American painter and illustrator best known for his covers for the journal The Saturday Evening Post.

Freedom of Speech
The Runaway

In 1916 he sold his first cover to The Saturday Evening Post, for which in the next 47 years he illustrated a total of 322 magazine covers.

Rosie the Riveter

He is also noted for his 64-year relationship with the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), during which he produced covers for their publication Boys’ Life, calendars, and other illustrations. 

Scout Came to the Rescue

Rockwell’s realistic manner accurately reflected the atmosphere of everyday life.

Freedom from Want

Some critics dismissed him for not having real artistic merit, but Rockwell’s reasons for painting what he did were grounded in the world that was around him.

The Problem We All Live With

“Maybe as I grew up and found the world wasn’t the perfect place I had thought it to be, I unconsciously decided that if it wasn’t an ideal world, it should be, and so painted only the ideal aspects of it,” he once said.

Girl With Black Eye

He shared the same hopes and dreams  when he said, “I paint life as I would like it to be.”

Boy and Girl Gazing at the Moon

More of Normal Rockwell‘s well-loved paintings can be found at https://www.nrm.org/

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Scott Hagan

Scott Hagan, known as the Barn Artist, specializes in hand-painting larger than life designs on various types of buildings, especially schools and barns. 

Hagan has painted a variety of signage, murals of all types and more across Ohio and 18 other states for the past 23 years.

Located in Jerusalem, Ohio, Hagan’s  career  began when he was hired as part of the Ohio Bicentennial barn painting campaign.

After finishing his last Ohio bicentennial barn in 2002, the Belmont County man kept right on going.

People wanted his freestyle paint jobs — Hagan still uses an old-fashioned brush — on their barns, silos, grain elevators, storefronts and gym floors.

His portfolio has grown to include not only the 88 Bicentennial Barns, but more than 800 additional barns, silos, and other structures across the country.

In 2015, Hagan began painting Ohio History Barns, commissioned by the Ohio History Connection and local historical societies, to present Ohio’s rich heritage of significant people, places, and achievements, and to whet the public’s appetite to learn more.“This is such a lost art or forgotten art,” Hagan says. But not forgotten by everyone.

Hagan is trying to keep an old tradition going — one gallon of paint at a time.

More of Scott Hagan‘s amazing over-sized paintings can be found at http://barnartist.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Hans Holbein the Younger

Hans Holbein the Younger (1497-1543) was a German painter, draftsman, and designer, renowned for the precise rendering of his drawings and the compelling realism of his portraits, particularly those recording the court of King Henry VIII of England.

Henry VIII

Holbein the Younger was one of the most celebrated portraitists of the sixteenth century.

Jean De Dinteville and Georges de Selves

At an early age he won commissions to paint portraits of prominent merchants in Basel, and in later years he attracted powerful patrons in England, including Sir Thomas More.

Sir Thomas More

He also produced religious art, satire, and Reformation propaganda, and he made a significant contribution to the history of book design.

Anne of Cleves

Holbein’s art has sometimes been called realist, since he drew and painted with a rare precision.

Edward, Prince of Wales

He was never content with outward appearance, however; he embedded layers of symbolism, allusion, and paradox in his art, to the lasting fascination of scholars.

Jane Seymour

His portraits were renowned in their time for their likeness, and it is through his eyes that many famous figures of his day are pictured today.

Henry VIII

More of Hans Holbein the Younger‘s portraits can be found at https://www.hans-holbein.org/

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Beatriz Hidalgo de la Garza

 

Beatriz Hidalgo de la Garza is a Mexican painter, architect, wife, humanist, mother, and above all … Proudly Mexican.Hidalgo was born in 1967 in southern Mexico. She graduated from TIBA University of Painting and Fine Arts, where she studied the art of drawing with pastels and charcoal. The desire  to transfer the beauty of the world around her to the canvas encouraged Hidalgo to develop a brilliant career, first as an architect and then as an artist.Hidalgo portrays all feelings for Mexico and its people in her never-ending project “Soul of Mexico.”Her secret of creating beautiful art lies in the deep love and respect she has for her people and her country.“Everything I paint has a story to be told when those eyes of the soul come to listen,” Hidalgo shares.Indeed, the beauty of the children, the old people, and the country, is reflected in every brush stroke.

More of Beatriz Hidalgo de la Garza’s amazing paintings can be found at https://www.facebook.com/Beatriz-Hidalgo-De-la-Garza/  or https://www.tuttartpitturasculturapoesiamusica.com/2010/12/beatriz-hidalgo-de-la-garza.html. 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Frederic Sackrider Remington

 

Frederic Sackrider Remington (1861-1909) was an American painter, illustrator, sculptor, and writer who specialized in depictions of the Old American West, specifically concentrating on the last quarter of the 19th century American West and images of cowboys, American Indians, and the U.S. Cavalry.A Dash for the Timber

 

Remington studied art at Yale University (1878–80) and briefly at the Art Students League of New York. Thereafter he devoted himself primarily to illustrative work.A Cold Morning on the Range

 

In the years between his schooling, he traveled widely, spending much time west of the Mississippi River, and he made a specialty of depicting Native Americanscowboys, soldiers, horses, and other aspects of life on the plains.The Emigrants

 

On those trips he sketched and photographed continuously, amassing material to take back to and work from in his studio in New York City.The Hunters Supper

 

During the 1880s and ’90s many of Remington’s illustrations were printed in such popular magazines as Harper’s Weekly and Scribner’s Magazine.The Trooper

 

During the Spanish-American War he was a war correspondent and artist. Remington was primarily a reporter, recording the image of the thing seen; his work is notable for its rendering of swift action and its accuracy of detail.The Apaches

 

More of Frederic Remington‘s inspirational paintings can be found at https://www.frederic-remington.org.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Lana Privitera

 

Originally from Spain, Lana Privitera  graduated in 1983 from the Fine Arts School of  Zaragoza, where she majored in Fashion Design and Art History.After working in Advertising for a few years, she moved to the USA in the early 1990’s.  After a long hiatus, she returned to painting watercolors again in 2014, focusing this time in highly realistic Still Lifes.Privitera’s large watercolors have been accepted and exhibited in numerous USA and International competitions, winning top awards in a number of them.Her work is incredibly clean, clear, and full of light and life.Sometimes you will find yourself asking — is this a photograph or a painting?Everyday things take on an extra depth and hue in Privitera’s watercolors.

More of Lana Privitera‘s amazing paintings can be found at https://www.watercolorsbylana.com/.

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Franz Marc

Franz Marc (1880-1916) was a German print maker and artist.He not only had an influence on art during his time, but was considered to be one of the key figures of the Expressionist movement in Germany.Influences such as Fauvism, Cubism and Impressionism all impacted on the way in which Franz Marc created form. After early experiments with Naturalism and Realism, Marc later eschewed those styles in favor of the greater symbolic potential of abstraction.He is most famous for his images of brightly colored animals, especially horses, which he used to convey profound messages about humanity, the natural world, and the fate of mankind.Color was extremely important for Marc. Not only did he understand the potential for color to affect mood, he developed a specific theory of color symbolism.Franz Marc spent time analyzing the use of color within art history. He then formulated a method of color for his own work.Blue tones would symbolize strength and masculinity, yellows for the feminine side, and red with the physical and violent modern world.More of Franz Marc‘s beautiful art can be found at http://www.franzmarc.org/.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Shirley Quaid

A child of Oklahoma, Shirley Quaid has lived in numerous states as an adult,  but the trail always led back to home, Oklahoma.Her early upbringing on her grandfather’s farm in her formative years had a great influence on her work.Shirley began painting after her children were raised and had her first studio in the back of her husband’s offices in Wewoka, Oklahoma.Her childhood fascination with all things in the 1880’s fueled her eventual concentration on Western Art.She is fascinated with the spirit of living beings, both human and not,  and is happily surprised and delighted when she can reveal their life’s light in her work.Rural Oklahoma called her back in 2016 where she can be found on a daily basis in her studio happily painting images of the people of the American frontier in a representation style.More of Shirley Quaid’s amazing work can be found at https://www.shirleyquaid.com/

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Amy Giacomelli 

Amy Giacomelli started her career in art in 1988 by joining the Entertainment Industry union as a mural artist.Over the years she has painted countless murals and backdrops for studios such as Disney, CBS and Warner Bros., as well as lots of independent shops.Her colorful gallery includes cats, birds, flowers, dogs, landscapes, and other subjects that burst with color and imagination.For Amy, color is at the core of her style.She does a fabulous job of conveying emotion and movement through vibrant shades, well mixed to create bright and beautiful pieces.Often depicting nature, her work draws inspiration from real life, while translating it into more abstract expression..With a background in painting murals, it should be no surprise that Amy enjoys large pieces, sometimes broken up into multi panel works..More of Amy Giacomelli’s work can be found at https://amy-giacomelli.pixels.com/ and https://www.etsy.com/shop/AmyGiacomelli

Sunday Evening Art Gallery (midweek) — Alexandra Spyratos

Alexandra Spyratos was born in Kenya where she lives most of her life surrounded by the exotic beauty and wilderness of Africa.Influenced by her colorful background, translating the heat and the exotic beauty of the African wildlife to canvas has become Spyratos’ passion and spiritual goal.This prolific artist has become known for her bold and individual style.Her paintings are rich and textured with oxidized patterned gold and copper leaf, recreating the physicality and textures of the wild that inspires her.Her medium sees a diverse direction evolving into the elegance and glamour of gold, silver and copper leaf combines with the fluorescence.The combination is dynamic and adds a fresh and energetic dimension to her art, aptly termed as “Bohemian Chic”.Alexandra’s artistic presentation of the elephant, ostrich, buffalo, giraffe and predominantly the regal zebra, swirls about and leaps to her palette in representational form.It is this deep inspiration from the heart of Africa that has emerged in Alexandra’s painting of the wildlife and has evolved into a style that straddles all genre and is uniquely her own.More of Alexandra Spyratos can be found at www.facebook.com/alexandraartart/.

 

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Mark Messersmith

 

Mark Messersmith (1955-)  was born in Kansas City, Missouri lives and works in Tallahassee, Florida where he teaches at Florida State University.

The artist extends beyond the frame of his central images surveying man’s ruin. He also includes a small frieze of vignettes at the bottom and sculptural adornments at the frame’s edge.

His work explores themes of spirit and struggle within the modern world’s natural environments.

Messersmith likes to focus on the habitats of Florida’s animals in the way they live and react to one another.

In his words, “My work is really about our relationship to all other living creatures at this precarious moment, a place midway between hope and despair.”

His works reflect plants and animals, which are still able to survive,  often in small isolated natural habitats, and the effects of their inevitable forced migration, dislocation, or isolation.

His works build on stories (either real or conjectured), along with observations and concerns for the creatures that move within the shrinking environs they inhabit.

More of Mark Messersmith‘s inspirational work can be found at https://markmessersmith.com.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery (flashback) — Svetlana Bobrova

I think one of my favorite Sunday Evening Art Gallery posts was from back in November, 2014, when I shared images from the artist Svetlana Bobrova. A surrealistic artist from Russia, the figures in her paintings are hauntingly beautiful. I cannot get enough of her and her imagination.

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can see more of Svetlana Bobrova‘s amazing work at my Sunday Evening Art Gallery blog or at the blue link above.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn

Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (1606-1669) was a Dutch draughtsman, painter, and printmaker.

An innovative and prolific master, he is generally considered one of the greatest visual artists in the history of art and the most important in Dutch art history.Rembrandt’s works depict a wide range of style and subject matter, from portraits and self-portraits to landscapes, genre scenes, allegorical and historical scenes, and biblical and mythological themes.Rembrandt’s portraits of his contemporaries, self-portraits, and scenes from the Bible are regarded as his greatest creative triumphs.Rembrandt’s foremost contribution in the history of printmaking was his transformation of the etching process from a relatively new reproductive technique into a true art form.He was also an avid art collector and dealer. Rembrandt lived beyond his means, buying art, prints, and rarities, which probably helped his bankruptcy in 1656, by selling most of his paintings and large collection of antiquities which included Old Master paintings and drawings, busts of the Roman Emperors, suits of Japanese armor, and collections of natural history and minerals.Unfortunately, the end of his life was far from the famous painter he would become.Rembrandt died in 1669 in Amsterdam and was buried as a poor man in an unknown grave in the Westerkerk. After twenty years, his remains were taken away and destroyed, as was customary with the remains of poor people at the time.

More of Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn’s amazing life and art can be found at http://www.rembrandtpainting.net/ and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rembrandt.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — James Michalopoulos

Painter and sculptor James Michalopoulos was born in 1951 in Pennsylvania. Michalopoulos received a BA from Bowdoin College. After managing the Boston Food Co-op for two years, he began to sketch. He has never stopped making art.

In 1981 he was drawn to New Orleans as the last bastion of hippie bohemian culture in America.He began sketching artists and musicians, houses and street corners.Fascinated with the duality of beauty and decay, the architecture of the city became his muse.Capturing the spirit and the essence of his subject in layer upon layer of thick impasto paint, a portrait of the city appeared, brimming with color and energy.In the early 1990’s Michalopoulos operated a studio out of Lausanne, Switzerland, and exhibited both there and in Geneva, London and Berlin. Today he divides his time between New Orleans and Burgundy.The French countryside, with its Roman era stone buildings and verdant fields, has become a large focus of his work, but there is nothing better than New Orleans.

More of James Michalopoulos‘  wonderful art can be found at https://www.michalopoulos.com/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get Creative and Share!

Grandkids Get Creative

Today — Every day — is for sharing. Sometimes I’m not up to it, other days I’m buzzing around like a bee with pollen. Today is a pollen day.

I’d like to share some of my blogger friends’ finished artwork. I enjoy following them, and I really appreciate their efforts to bring beauty into the world. I know I might miss some, but that share is for another day. Take a look — follow the links — and enjoy their work for yourself.

 

https://dailyfiberfun.wordpress.com/

 

https://friendlyfairytales.com/

Seeing the same four walls
in this endless
pandemic confinement,
but imagining far fields……………

 

https://ivors20.wordpress.com/

There must be a number of silent masks around

Yesterday an old mask flew away at the speed of sound

From behind, the real pieces of what we perceive……………

 

https://gwenniesgardenworld.wordpress.com/

 

https://chaoticshapes.com/

 

https://anthonygrootelaar.blog/

 

https://rakupottery.ca/

 

https://leafandtwig.wordpress.com/

the flowers’ shadows
write their own poem
on the book’s pages

 

https://brushparkwatercolors.wordpress.com/

 

https://thelonelyauthorblog.com/

i will love you
in the silence of your reflection
in the echoes of your pain………………………….

 

https://rothpoetry.wordpress.com/

Painting // passing time
Waiting for Summer release
Ready for a hug

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Charles Vickery

 

Charles Vickery (1913-1998) was an American painter born in Hinsdale, Illinois.

He is best known for his naturalistic depictions of historic ships in the open ocean and crashing waves in all types of weather and times of day.Vickery studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the American Academy of Fine Arts.Recognized as the “finest seascape artist of our time” by the Los Angeles Maritime Museum, Vickery was known for his dramatic paintings of the sea.Vickery brought a new meaning to the term “marine art” as he submerged himself in the study of the constant interplay of nature — the sun, sky, wind and water all working together.He deeply loved the ocean, saying, “All the colors of water come from the sky because every color of the sky is reflected in that water. And the sky has all the colors of the rainbow in it.”

In his lifetime, Vickery saw his works grace the walls of galleries, embassies and private residences.

More of Charles Vickery‘s masterpieces can be found at https://www.vickeryart.com.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Christine Van Sickle

Christine Van Sickle‘s creative journey started in the early 1990’s. In 1994 she had her first art piece published in the Green Bay Press Gazette, and from then on she was hooked.Van Sickle has always loved the creative process, and later in life it became a much needed escape from the daily stresses of life.Van Sickle’s work includes realism and surrealism pieces. They are often nature inspired,  and  usually start as a normal landscape or animal.She has worked with ink, watercolor, and other mediums, but prefers acrylic on canvas.The artist makes a point to listen and watch other artists. She also encourages others to pick up a brush and try it themselves.

More of Christine Van Sickle‘s artwork can be found at www.cvansicklestudios.com, or her Instagram page https://www.instagram.com/cvansicklestudios/. 

Send inquiries (custom, original art, or print requests) to cvansickle16@gmail.com.