Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Salman Khoshroo

Iranian painter Salman Khoshroo uses a palette knife and sizable layers of paint to create the emotive portraits in his recent series, “White on White.”In contrast to his previous work that relied on swirling reds, blues, and yellows, Khoshroo’s latest impasto pieces are monochromatic.Starting with a hunk of paint, the artist then forms the portrait’s outline before shaping the rest of the face that lacks distinct physical features.Viewers can follow his creative process step-by-step by looking at the edges of each stroke.Khoshroo hopes to capture a human spark with minimal intervention and create portraits of people that make you feel something, people you didn’t even know you were looking for.Painted with a single pigment in a sandbox method, these faces are the result of taking a chunk of paint and molding it.It is amazing that one can see so many features in such few movements.

More of Salman Khoshroo‘s diverse art can be found at http://salmankhoshroo.com/ and https://www.ignant.com/2019/12/30/a-portrait-of-anonymity-salman-khoshroo-molds-emotive-faces-from-smeared-paint/

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Tia Crystal

A Visionary Artist, Jewelry Designer, and Energy Healer, Tia Crystal always knew there would be a deeper meaning to her life.Some of the most valuable expressions under the umbrella  of “Spiritual Art”  relates to the inclusion of crystals, spiritual quotes,  and affirmations woven into the art.Crystal has long attracted a select and international circle of collectors, drawn by her organic style and enchanting persona.Years ago, a vision came to her in a dream guiding her to Italy. In response, and with complete trust, she left to embark on a journey that would have a profound life changing impact on her.While walking in silence in the countryside of Assisi, Tia stumbled upon an old paintbrush lying under a bush. Next to it, there was a bottle lid with a T on it.Everything within her told her to pay attention to the message  of these discoveries, and so began her journey of creating Art that leaves one not only mesmerized but intoxicated with inner and outer peace.Crystal’s work is unmatched in its color’s, scope, variety, and deep spiritual meaning.More of Tia Crystal‘s magical art can be found at https://tiacrystal.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — William Blake

William Blake (1757-1827) was a English Romantic painter, printmaker,  poet, and radical visionary who expressed his mystical views through paintings, engravings, and poetry.

Isaac Newton

 

Born in London into a working-class family with strong nonconformist religious beliefs, Blake first studied art as a boy, at the drawing academy of Henry Pars.

Jacob’s Ladder

 

He served a five-year apprenticeship with the commercial engraver James Basire before entering the Royal Academy Schools as an engraver at the age of twenty-two.

The Angels Hovering Over the Body of Christ in the Sepulchre

 

Although William completed much of his commercial work in line engraving, for his own projects he used his skills as an engraver to expand on the traditions of “stereotype” (a 16th century process whereby a metal cast is made of a wooded engraving) and created a new procedure called relief etching.

The marriage of Heaven and Hell

 

Yet Blake was the archetypal romantic painter, always depicting his subjects in heightened colors and scenes.

The Red Dragon and the Woman Clothed with the Sun

 

He was a master of allegory and often raised eyebrows and even ire by his choice of expression.

The Ghost of a Flea

 

Although the majority of his early work was inspired by religious or classical figures, much of his later art was fuel by his inner landscape and informed by his religious visions. 

Archangel Raphael with Adam and Eve

 

Many of his contemporaries considered him quite mad as he readily spoke about his visions and fantasies with people and it was common knowledge among the artistic community of the day. 

The Temptation and Fall of Eve

 

Whatever his inspiration, William Blake has left a legacy of poetry and paintings behind.

The Ancient of Days

 

More of William Blake’s wonderfully imaginative paintings can be found at http://www.williamblake.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Viktor Mikhailovich Zundalev

 

Mikhailovich Zundalev is one of those artists that have very little personal information online, yet whose paintings bring a warm, fresh feeling to the heart.Zundalev was born in 1953 in Ryzan, Russia.After graduating from the Art School named after G. K. Wagner, Zundalev began painting colorful flower arrangements. According to his scant biography, he paints, participates in exhibitions,  and at the same time works as an artist for many years in the Art Fund of the city of Kaluga.In 1989, he was admitted to the Union of Artists of the USSR.His paintings are textured, colorful, and full of life. One can only dream of having one of his vased bouquets  in the center of their table.

Zundalev may or not be an actual painter, but his works reflect the beauty of light and scent and nature.

Viktor Mikhailovich Zundalev‘s lovely paintings can be found scattered throughout the Internet, including ArtNow .

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Lady Pink

Whether portraying women as provocative street warriors in the concrete jungle or as mythical goddesses placed in surrealist environments, Lady Pink, the long-reigning queen of graffiti, consistently elevates the female figure through her murals and paintings by incorporating themes of fantasy, spiritualism, her South American heritage, and indigenous iconography.Lady Pink was born Sandra Fabara in Ecuador in 1964 and raised in New York City.She started making graffiti at the age of 15 and quickly became well known as the only prominent female in the graffiti subculture.Pink’s beginning focus was on painting subway trains.She had first solo exhibition at 21 and her paintings are included in important collections like the MET, The Whitney Museum, The Museum of the City of N.Y. and others.Pink has gone great lengths to fight for equality, justice, and women’s rights.She expresses her private opinion to public work, without any censors, although she never reveals the idea in fullness.She cleverly states out what is important, and warmly put her artwork open to interpretation.Pink’s  tradition is to practice mindfulness and to be as sensible as possible to the community.“Art is about a binary relationship, and the audience is free to make assumptions and interpretations as they like,” she says about her work.More of Lady Pink‘s murals and paintings can be found at https://www.ladypinknyc.com/.

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Erin Hanson

 

Combining the emotional resonance of 19th-century Impressionists with the lavish color palette of Expressionism, Erin Hanson’s unique style has come to be known as “Open Impressionism.”Erin Hanson began painting as a young girl, voraciously learning oils, acrylics, watercolor, pen and ink, pastels, and life drawing from accomplished art instructors. She began commissioning paintings at age ten, and by age twelve, she was employed after school by a mural studio, learning the techniques of acrylics on the grand scale of forty-foot canvases. Graduating high school at age sixteen and once again demonstrating that she was a child prodigy, Hanson next attended UC Berkeley, excelling further in her studies and creative development and attaining a degree in Bioengineering.Two years later, a high school scholarship took her to Otis College of Art, where she immersed herself in figure drawing.After graduating from college, Hanson entered the art trade as a professional, inspired by landscapes and vantage points only beheld by the most adventurous.For the past decade Hanson has been developing a unique, minimalist technique of placing impasto paint strokes without layering, which has become known as “Open-Impressionism.”Her passion for natural beauty is seen in her work as she transforms vistas familiar and rare into stunning interpretations of bold color, playful rhythms and raw emotional impact. “I am not trying to re-create a photograph, I am trying to get my viewers to open their eyes and see their world a little differently,” Hanson said.More of Erin Hanson’s imaginative paintings can be found at https://www.erinhanson.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Wawiriya Burton

Wawiriya Burton is an Australian Aboriginal artist known for her acrylic paintings.

Burton belongs to the Pitjantjatjara, an Aboringinal people of the Central Australian desert near Uluru.She was born in outback central Australia sometime during the 1920s, and grew up living a traditional, nomadic way of life.

She originally specialized in baskets and punu (wood carvings) from spinifex (a  perennial coastal plant) at the Tjala Arts Centre in Southern Australia in 2008, but later learned to paint from other women.

Her paintings are representations of sacred stories from the Dreamtime.Like other Aboriginal artists, the representations are blurred (or encrypted) for cultural reasons.The full meaning of her artworks can only be understood or deciphered by people who have been initiated.Burton is a ngangkaṟi (traditional healer), so she has more knowledge about sacred traditions than most in her community.

More of Wawiriya Burton‘s soul filled paintings can be found at Wikipedia and Aboriginal Signature.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Pablo Picasso

Pablo Ruiz Picasso (1881 – 1973) was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, and theatre designer who spent most of his adult life in France.

The Old Guitarist

 

Regarded as one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture, the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore.

Guernica

 

Picasso demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a naturalistic manner through his childhood and adolescence.

Family of Saltimbanques

 

During the first decade of the 20th century, his style changed as he experimented with different theories, techniques, and ideas.

Girl before a Mirror

 

After 1906, the Fauvist work of the slightly older artist Henri Matisse motivated Picasso to explore more radical styles, beginning a fruitful rivalry between the two artists, who subsequently were often paired by critics as the leaders of modern art.

Three Musicians

 

Much of Picasso’s work of the late 1910s and early 1920s is in a neoclassical style, and his work in the mid-1920s often has characteristics of Surrealism.

Gertrude Stein

 

His later work often combines elements of his earlier styles.

The Weeping Woman

 

Exceptionally prolific throughout the course of his long life, Picasso achieved universal renown and immense fortune for his revolutionary artistic accomplishments, and became one of the best-known figures in 20th-century art.

Picasso Statue, Chicago

 

More of Pablo Picasso’s wonderful art can be found at https://www.pablopicasso.org/ and http://www.picasso.com/.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Olaf Wieghorst

Olaf Carl Wieghorst (1899-1988) was born in Viborg, Denmark, and is known for his Western genre, Indian, cowboy, and horse paintings.

El Dorado

 

During his career, Wieghorst learned to master oil painting and watercolor painting, as well as numerous other art mediums.

Break Away

 

After three years of service with the Fifth Cavalry along the Mexican border, Wieghorst was mustered out of the military in 1922, and pursued the life of a cowboy, during which he wandered extensively throughout the Southwest, sketching whenever he could.

His Spotted Pony

 

In 1924, Wieghorst joined the New York City Police Department where he became a Mounted Police Officer with the Department.

Turning the Remuda

 

Due to his knowledge of horses, he was quickly sent to the Remount Section of the Mounted Unit where he broke and trained horses for the Unit.

Salt River Canyon

 

Olaf’s drawing and etchings have been displayed at the Madison Square Garden Rodeo and in the Rodeo’s Official Magazine.

Roping the Dunn

 

From 1938 to 1953, Olaf’s art was also featured on the covers of a Rodeo magazine published in Tucson Arizona titled “Hoofs and Horns.”

Wagon and Remuda

 

After retiring and moving to El Cajon Olaf settled down to paint, steadily gaining recognition for his classic cowboy and Indian subjects and became a master painter of the western scene.

Drifting

 

Wherever he went, he sketched and painted the Western culture he loved.

Comanche

 

Olaf was honored at the National Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City on November 15, 1974 for his contribution to Western Art.

Changing Outfits

 

More of Olaf Wieghorst‘s remarkable Western Art can be found at https://www.wieghorst.com.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Leslie Cobb

Leslie Cobb has shared her life with cats since she was a child and cannot imagine living without them.

Cobb tries to capture their unique qualities in her art.She uses acrylic paint because it washes easily out of cat fur when some of her models choose to take a more active role in the artistic process.Cobb is mostly self-taught; her formal training  limited to high school art classes and a couple of drawing courses at a community college.She began painting in 1998 after the death of her one-eyed cat, Esmeralda.The two had been together for 19 years; Cobb’s early paintings were an effort to honor her memory and cope with her grief.Cobb’s work has been displayed at art galleries, craft fairs and cat shows.She is also the illustrator of “Good St. Dominic’s Cat,” a children’s book by Ed Noonan, and her art appears on the covers of the Crazy Cat Lady mystery series of books by Mollie Hunt.

More of Leslie Cobb’s wonderful cat paintings can be found at http://www.lesliecobb.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Albrecht Dürer

Albrecht Dürer (1471 –1528) was a German painter, printmaker, and theorist of the German Renaissance.

Praying Hands

 

He was a brilliant painter, draftsman, and writer, though his first and probably greatest artistic impact was in the medium of printmaking.

Saint Jerome in his Study

 

Born in Nuremberg, Dürer established his reputation and influence across Europe in his twenties due to his high-quality woodcut prints.

Adam and Eve

 

He was in contact with the major Italian artists of his time, including Raphael and Leonardo da Vinci, and from 1512 was patronized by Emperor Maximilian I.

Portrait of Emperor Maximilian I

 

He believed that geometry was essential for producing harmonic artworks, and thus that it should be taught to all young artists, alongside other mathematical rigors.

Feast of the Rosary

 

Despite his decidedly Renaissance interest in Humanism and mathematics, Dürer continued to produce extremely detailed studies of the natural world, particularly animals, be they newly discovered in Europe (such as the mythical rhinoceros and lion) or common native creatures (such as the hare, owl, or cat).

Young Hare

 

Dürer was well aware of his own artistic genius, which equally tortured and enlivened him.

The Knight Death and the Devil

 

He painted a number of empowering self-portraits, and would often appear as a character in his painted commissions.

Self Portrait

 

More of Albrecht Dürer‘s art can be found at http://www.albrechtdurer.org.

 

 

 

#worldwatercolormonth – Daily watercolor no.02 Carsten Wieland – Dancing Brushes

 

If you find yourself with a free 9-11 minutes, I highly recommend watching Carsten’s videos, starting with this one. This is how a true artist works. He is amazing! And there are more at his website, https://brushparkwatercolors.wordpress.com/.

It is always a delight to watch someone in their element, isn’t it?

 

brushpark-watercolors

Celebrating the #worldwatercolormonth I am going to present a timelapse watercolor painting any day of July from my daily practice. All shown paintings are free improvisations in pure watercolor, done without any preparing sketches – just from the mind to the paper. Painting, music & video by Carsten Wieland, 2021 Using paints from Lukas Aquarell 1862 / @Lukasfarben #CarstenWieland #brushparkwatercolors #wielandfineart

Zur Feier des#worldwatercolormonthwerde ich jeden Tag im Juli ein Zeitraffer-Aquarell aus meiner täglichen Praxis präsentieren. Alle gezeigten Malereien sind freie Improvisationen in purem Aquarell – entstanden ohne vorbereitende Skizzen – einfach vom Kopf aufs Papier. Malerei, Musik und Video: Carsten Wieland, 2021 Ich verwende Farben von Lukas Aquarell 1862 / @Lukasfarben

Free watercolor tutorials:

https://freewatercolortutorials.wordpress.com/

Happy Watercolor How-To eBooks Tutorials step-by-step:

https://www.etsy.com/de/shop/WielandF…

Website:

https://www.wieland-fineart.com/

Watercolor Improvisation – 042_2021 Watercolor/ FABRIANO® “Disegno 5” fine, ca. 70 x 50 cm / 19.7 x 13.8 in / Lukas…

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William Utermohlen — Signs of Alzheimer’s

 

Conversation Pieces, Loyola University Museum of Art, Chicago

This is a little bit Sunday Evening Art Gallery post, a little Humoring the Goddess post. You’ll see what I mean.

I am a sucker for those “10 Things You Didn’t Know About …..” Most of them are flops, but every now and then I come across something that is extraordinary.

 

In 1995, U.K.-based American artist William Utermohlen was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.

1967

 

Before his death, Utermohlen created a heart-wrenching final series of self-portraits over the stages of Alzheimer’s, which lasted roughly five years.

1996

 

The last self-portraits, painted between 1995 and 2001, are unique artistic, medical, and psychological documents. They portray a man doomed yet fighting to preserve his identity and his place in the world in the face of an implacable disease encroaching on his mind and senses. 

1997

 

Alzheimer’s symptoms not only include memory loss or dementia and personality changes but it also affects the part of the brain, which is responsible for visualizing capabilities, so crucial for a painter.

1998

 

With Alzheimer’s progressing, the art becomes visibly more abstract, blurrier and vague, due to the loss of the aforementioned capabilities.

1999

 

The artist’s widow Patricia explains exactly why these images are so powerful:  “In these pictures we see with heart-breaking intensity William’s efforts to explain his altered self, his fears and his sadness.”

2000

 

Apart from portraits, still lives and drawings from the model, Utermohlen’s art can be arranged in six clear thematic cycles: The “Mythological” paintings of 1962-63; the “Cantos” of 1965-1966 inspired by Dante’s Inferno; the “Mummers” cycle of 1969-1970 depicting characters from South Philadelphia’s New Year’s Day parade; the “War” series of 1972 alluding to the Vietnam war; the “Nudes” of 1973-74; and finally the “Conversation Pieces”, the great decorative interiors with figures, of 1989-1991.

William Utermohlen died March 21, 2007. The mere thought that this artist tried to paint his being through the very end of his Alzheimer’s pays tribute to the creative soul in each one of us.

More of William Utermohlen’s story and paintings can be found at Bored Panda and Chris Boïcos Fine Arts websites.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Paul Dmoch

Paul Dmoch is a Belgian painter whose watercolors are playgrounds of light.In them, light sparkles, bounces, glows, splinters and plays hide and seek amid the complexities of cathedral interiors, Venetian canals, narrow streets, dappled courtyards, open plazas and architectural landmarks of several cities.Light is an actor in his paintings, alternately coy and bold, shining with bravado and peeking out from the shadows.His deft handling of color and value, backed with his solid draftsmanship, give Dmoch’s paintings of familiar landmarks a fresh interpretation.Dmoch especially likes to paint cathedrals. As he says, “I can feel all the mystery of ‘another space’ where we sometimes come, but not spend our lifetime.“Inside these structures we feel small and not so important as we sometime think we are. We can see that incredible, enormous structure, filled with endless lights pouring through a stained-glass window.“For me, light and shadow is a metaphor for the everlasting battle between these two basic elements of human existence. In the contrast between light and darkness lies the secret of every human beginning.”

More of Paul Dmoch’s amazing paintings can be found at https://www.grandmastersfineart.com/paul-dmoch.html and at http://linesandcolors.com/2015/02/17/paul-dmoch/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Léa Roche

After having long painted in traditional way, in oil, acrylic or watercolor, French artist Léa Roche turned her talent into a modern and very contemporary mix of urban and pop style.Roche invented her own brand and working technique under the name of ‘FuzzzyArt’.An artist with a passion for colors and technology, she is inspired by her travels, nature, and especially animals, to create unique multicolored paintings full of life.Roche specializes in portraits of animals, with a predilection for cats and felines, but also works with female faces, abstract scenes and other works.Her paintings come alive with bright colors, abstract shapes, and distinct personalities.There is a depth and beauty to Roche’s renditions, a connection of souls, between the artist and her canvas.More of  Léa Roche can be found at https://lea-roche.artmajeur.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Natalia Goncharova

Natalia Goncharova was a Russian avant-garde artist, paintercostume designer, writer, illustrator, and set designer, born in Tula, Russia.In 1892, her family moved to Moscow, hoping to improve its financial condition.

While at school, Goncharova developed an interest in history, zoology, and botany but eventually decided to pursue art, enrolling at the Moscow Institute of Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture in 1898.Initially preoccupied with icon painting and the primitivism of ethnic Russian folk-art, Goncharova soon began to mix Cubist and Futurist elements in her work, which led to the beginnings of Cubo-Futurism.From an influential, wealthy, and musical family, the artist’s own interests lay with Russia’s rural workers and by seeming contradiction, with a cast of otherworldly characters.Through repetitive everyday tasks, Goncharova observed the same celestial strength more commonly associated with religious figures, and in this sense merged the realms of heaven and earth in her pictures.She was a founding member of both the Jack of Diamonds (1909–1911), Moscow’s first radical independent exhibiting group, the more radical Donkey’s Tail (1912–1913), and with Larionov invented Rayonism (1912–1914).  The decorative, stylized quality of this work reflects Goncharova’s interest in the folk arts and religious icons of her native Russia.Goncharova emerged as an important and also a highly controversial figure, often breaking social conventions as well as rigid cultural dogmas.More of Natalia Goncharova’s colorful work can be found at http://Natalia Goncharova  and https://www.artst.org/natalia-goncharova/.

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — David de la Mano

David de la Mano is a Spanish contemporary artist best known for his stunning murals often depicting silhouettes, trees and other monochromatic imagery.Born in Salamanca in 1975, de la Mano has a degree in Fine Art from the University of Salamanca and PhD studies in Public Art from the University of Valencia.

He is known for his minimalist aesthetics while using black and white themes depicting human figures.His large-scale, black and white pieces provoke reactions among the viewers and encourage their emotions and ideas through a minimalist aesthetic.De la Mano is particularly interested by the theme of the link between human beings as a mass which evolves, in groups, as a flow, or the link between human and nature also as a danger or a union.He observes others and their social or anti-social behavior, exploring every corner of both in his practice, using silhouettes of men, women, or the masses as narrative metaphors.Through these figures, he gives poetic visions of the the human condition in society and the ways human perceive the world.

More of David de la Mano‘s imaginative work can be found at and at  https://daviddelamano.blogspot.com and https://bottleneckgallery.com/collections/david-de-la-mano.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Carolynda MacDonald

 

Carolynda MacDonald is a painter with a Bachelor of Science Honours in Biological Science, and a Fellowship from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Sciences with The Special Examination in Bacteriology from Paddington College of Technology, London.When it comes to her paintings, though, her explanations seem to come from a totally different direction.According to MacDonald, her paintings occupy an analogous realm, operating in a space reminiscent of daydreams or areas of quietude within the mind.She tries to bring together both landscape and still life painting in ways not normally encountered. In an increasingly busy and confusing world, MacDonald feels it is important to find solace for the soul, whether it is in art, music or literature, and her paintings are her way of contributing.Her paintings imply a stillness which is integral to the whole and provides a tranquil space for thought and reflection.MacDonald often chooses a bird to rise up in symbolic celebration of finding oneself in such a place or state of mind.More of Carolynda MacDonald‘s ethereal paintings can be found at http://www.carolyndamacdonald.com/ and https://www.tathagallery.com/artist/carolynda-macdonald.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Ruby Silvious

 

Ruby Silvious is a Philippines-born, US-based artist who has found an ingenious way to regenerate used tea bags into stunningly intricate works of art.She draws, paints, prints and collages moody, evocative and sometimes whimsical art on used teabag paper.Silvious attended Art Print Residency in Arenys de Munt, a municipality in Catalonia, Spain.While at the printmaking residency, she found time each evening to paint a used tea bag, usually inspired by random activities or places she had explored that day.By the end of her stay, she had amassed several used tea bags and a small, intimate collection of miniature paintings.In 2015 she started a project called 363 Days of Tea, a visual daily record of her impression of the moment, using the emptied-out tea bag as her canvas, and altering it to create a new work of art every day for 363 days.Silvious wants viewers to keep an open mind and think beyond the boundaries of what they may consider traditional art.“It seems to me that even non-tea drinkers are fascinated with my work. Maybe it’s because it’s just a unique canvas,” she reflects.More of Ruby Silvious’ ingenious paintings can be found at https://www.rubysilvious.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Richard Savoie

Richard Savoie is a Quebec painter born in Moncton New Brunswick.

Savoie comes from a family of artists, including an uncle who is part of Canada’s National Gallery.

Savoie is known for his beautiful oil paintings of winter landscapes and urban environments.

The subjects of his paintings become part of the mystery as they slowly walk further into the distance with their back turned on the narrator.

Many of his works specializes in frosty winters bursting with light, even if depicted in the middle of the night.

Savoie astonishes with an impeccable visual memory, a skill with which he paints and, in turn, places the viewer at the exact place and time as experienced by the artist himself.

Each work reveals another fragment of the universe in a tapestry of light and color that allows viewers to savor the finesse of his fresh and spontaneous approach.

Richard Savoie‘s work can be found in major galleries throughout Canada and is also part of some of the country’s most important collections.

You can also find his work at https://balcondart.com/en/savoie-richard/.

 

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery (midweek) — Nenad Vasic


I am in quite a quandary about sharing art from an artist that may or may not exist.
Sometimes appreciating art and a specific artist leaves you nothing but a name and an image. So it is with artist Nenad Vasic.

All I could find on him was that he is from Kladovo, Serbia. I could find no history, no profile, no personal thoughts on his life or artistic journey.

I don’t even know if his work is personal or the result of some computer generation. But unique art is unique art no matter what, isn’t it?I was drawn to Vasic’s colorful style which I call “modernistic electric painting.”

His offbeat style of separate lines to display buildings, scenery, and portraits is unusual and different. Whether digital art, hand-painted originals, or printmaking, his work puts a fresh modern and futuristic touch on classic scenes.Sometimes to appreciate art you need to let go of the personal and just let the moment of color or shape or texture assault your senses.So, for now, that is how it is with Vasic’s art.More of Nenad Vasic’s unique art can be found at https://nenad-vasic.pixels.com/ and at https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/nenad-vasic.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Norman Rockwell

 

Norman Rockwell, (1894 -1978), was an American painter and illustrator best known for his covers for the journal The Saturday Evening Post.

Freedom of Speech
The Runaway

In 1916 he sold his first cover to The Saturday Evening Post, for which in the next 47 years he illustrated a total of 322 magazine covers.

Rosie the Riveter

He is also noted for his 64-year relationship with the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), during which he produced covers for their publication Boys’ Life, calendars, and other illustrations. 

Scout Came to the Rescue

Rockwell’s realistic manner accurately reflected the atmosphere of everyday life.

Freedom from Want

Some critics dismissed him for not having real artistic merit, but Rockwell’s reasons for painting what he did were grounded in the world that was around him.

The Problem We All Live With

“Maybe as I grew up and found the world wasn’t the perfect place I had thought it to be, I unconsciously decided that if it wasn’t an ideal world, it should be, and so painted only the ideal aspects of it,” he once said.

Girl With Black Eye

He shared the same hopes and dreams  when he said, “I paint life as I would like it to be.”

Boy and Girl Gazing at the Moon

More of Normal Rockwell‘s well-loved paintings can be found at https://www.nrm.org/

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Scott Hagan

Scott Hagan, known as the Barn Artist, specializes in hand-painting larger than life designs on various types of buildings, especially schools and barns. 

Hagan has painted a variety of signage, murals of all types and more across Ohio and 18 other states for the past 23 years.

Located in Jerusalem, Ohio, Hagan’s  career  began when he was hired as part of the Ohio Bicentennial barn painting campaign.

After finishing his last Ohio bicentennial barn in 2002, the Belmont County man kept right on going.

People wanted his freestyle paint jobs — Hagan still uses an old-fashioned brush — on their barns, silos, grain elevators, storefronts and gym floors.

His portfolio has grown to include not only the 88 Bicentennial Barns, but more than 800 additional barns, silos, and other structures across the country.

In 2015, Hagan began painting Ohio History Barns, commissioned by the Ohio History Connection and local historical societies, to present Ohio’s rich heritage of significant people, places, and achievements, and to whet the public’s appetite to learn more.“This is such a lost art or forgotten art,” Hagan says. But not forgotten by everyone.

Hagan is trying to keep an old tradition going — one gallon of paint at a time.

More of Scott Hagan‘s amazing over-sized paintings can be found at http://barnartist.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Hans Holbein the Younger

Hans Holbein the Younger (1497-1543) was a German painter, draftsman, and designer, renowned for the precise rendering of his drawings and the compelling realism of his portraits, particularly those recording the court of King Henry VIII of England.

Henry VIII

Holbein the Younger was one of the most celebrated portraitists of the sixteenth century.

Jean De Dinteville and Georges de Selves

At an early age he won commissions to paint portraits of prominent merchants in Basel, and in later years he attracted powerful patrons in England, including Sir Thomas More.

Sir Thomas More

He also produced religious art, satire, and Reformation propaganda, and he made a significant contribution to the history of book design.

Anne of Cleves

Holbein’s art has sometimes been called realist, since he drew and painted with a rare precision.

Edward, Prince of Wales

He was never content with outward appearance, however; he embedded layers of symbolism, allusion, and paradox in his art, to the lasting fascination of scholars.

Jane Seymour

His portraits were renowned in their time for their likeness, and it is through his eyes that many famous figures of his day are pictured today.

Henry VIII

More of Hans Holbein the Younger‘s portraits can be found at https://www.hans-holbein.org/

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Beatriz Hidalgo de la Garza

 

Beatriz Hidalgo de la Garza is a Mexican painter, architect, wife, humanist, mother, and above all … Proudly Mexican.Hidalgo was born in 1967 in southern Mexico. She graduated from TIBA University of Painting and Fine Arts, where she studied the art of drawing with pastels and charcoal. The desire  to transfer the beauty of the world around her to the canvas encouraged Hidalgo to develop a brilliant career, first as an architect and then as an artist.Hidalgo portrays all feelings for Mexico and its people in her never-ending project “Soul of Mexico.”Her secret of creating beautiful art lies in the deep love and respect she has for her people and her country.“Everything I paint has a story to be told when those eyes of the soul come to listen,” Hidalgo shares.Indeed, the beauty of the children, the old people, and the country, is reflected in every brush stroke.

More of Beatriz Hidalgo de la Garza’s amazing paintings can be found at https://www.facebook.com/Beatriz-Hidalgo-De-la-Garza/  or https://www.tuttartpitturasculturapoesiamusica.com/2010/12/beatriz-hidalgo-de-la-garza.html. 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Frederic Sackrider Remington

 

Frederic Sackrider Remington (1861-1909) was an American painter, illustrator, sculptor, and writer who specialized in depictions of the Old American West, specifically concentrating on the last quarter of the 19th century American West and images of cowboys, American Indians, and the U.S. Cavalry.A Dash for the Timber

 

Remington studied art at Yale University (1878–80) and briefly at the Art Students League of New York. Thereafter he devoted himself primarily to illustrative work.A Cold Morning on the Range

 

In the years between his schooling, he traveled widely, spending much time west of the Mississippi River, and he made a specialty of depicting Native Americanscowboys, soldiers, horses, and other aspects of life on the plains.The Emigrants

 

On those trips he sketched and photographed continuously, amassing material to take back to and work from in his studio in New York City.The Hunters Supper

 

During the 1880s and ’90s many of Remington’s illustrations were printed in such popular magazines as Harper’s Weekly and Scribner’s Magazine.The Trooper

 

During the Spanish-American War he was a war correspondent and artist. Remington was primarily a reporter, recording the image of the thing seen; his work is notable for its rendering of swift action and its accuracy of detail.The Apaches

 

More of Frederic Remington‘s inspirational paintings can be found at https://www.frederic-remington.org.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Lana Privitera

 

Originally from Spain, Lana Privitera  graduated in 1983 from the Fine Arts School of  Zaragoza, where she majored in Fashion Design and Art History.After working in Advertising for a few years, she moved to the USA in the early 1990’s.  After a long hiatus, she returned to painting watercolors again in 2014, focusing this time in highly realistic Still Lifes.Privitera’s large watercolors have been accepted and exhibited in numerous USA and International competitions, winning top awards in a number of them.Her work is incredibly clean, clear, and full of light and life.Sometimes you will find yourself asking — is this a photograph or a painting?Everyday things take on an extra depth and hue in Privitera’s watercolors.

More of Lana Privitera‘s amazing paintings can be found at https://www.watercolorsbylana.com/.

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Franz Marc

Franz Marc (1880-1916) was a German print maker and artist.He not only had an influence on art during his time, but was considered to be one of the key figures of the Expressionist movement in Germany.Influences such as Fauvism, Cubism and Impressionism all impacted on the way in which Franz Marc created form. After early experiments with Naturalism and Realism, Marc later eschewed those styles in favor of the greater symbolic potential of abstraction.He is most famous for his images of brightly colored animals, especially horses, which he used to convey profound messages about humanity, the natural world, and the fate of mankind.Color was extremely important for Marc. Not only did he understand the potential for color to affect mood, he developed a specific theory of color symbolism.Franz Marc spent time analyzing the use of color within art history. He then formulated a method of color for his own work.Blue tones would symbolize strength and masculinity, yellows for the feminine side, and red with the physical and violent modern world.More of Franz Marc‘s beautiful art can be found at http://www.franzmarc.org/.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Shirley Quaid

A child of Oklahoma, Shirley Quaid has lived in numerous states as an adult,  but the trail always led back to home, Oklahoma.Her early upbringing on her grandfather’s farm in her formative years had a great influence on her work.Shirley began painting after her children were raised and had her first studio in the back of her husband’s offices in Wewoka, Oklahoma.Her childhood fascination with all things in the 1880’s fueled her eventual concentration on Western Art.She is fascinated with the spirit of living beings, both human and not,  and is happily surprised and delighted when she can reveal their life’s light in her work.Rural Oklahoma called her back in 2016 where she can be found on a daily basis in her studio happily painting images of the people of the American frontier in a representation style.More of Shirley Quaid’s amazing work can be found at https://www.shirleyquaid.com/

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Amy Giacomelli 

Amy Giacomelli started her career in art in 1988 by joining the Entertainment Industry union as a mural artist.Over the years she has painted countless murals and backdrops for studios such as Disney, CBS and Warner Bros., as well as lots of independent shops.Her colorful gallery includes cats, birds, flowers, dogs, landscapes, and other subjects that burst with color and imagination.For Amy, color is at the core of her style.She does a fabulous job of conveying emotion and movement through vibrant shades, well mixed to create bright and beautiful pieces.Often depicting nature, her work draws inspiration from real life, while translating it into more abstract expression..With a background in painting murals, it should be no surprise that Amy enjoys large pieces, sometimes broken up into multi panel works..More of Amy Giacomelli’s work can be found at https://amy-giacomelli.pixels.com/ and https://www.etsy.com/shop/AmyGiacomelli

Sunday Evening Art Gallery (midweek) — Alexandra Spyratos

Alexandra Spyratos was born in Kenya where she lives most of her life surrounded by the exotic beauty and wilderness of Africa.Influenced by her colorful background, translating the heat and the exotic beauty of the African wildlife to canvas has become Spyratos’ passion and spiritual goal.This prolific artist has become known for her bold and individual style.Her paintings are rich and textured with oxidized patterned gold and copper leaf, recreating the physicality and textures of the wild that inspires her.Her medium sees a diverse direction evolving into the elegance and glamour of gold, silver and copper leaf combines with the fluorescence.The combination is dynamic and adds a fresh and energetic dimension to her art, aptly termed as “Bohemian Chic”.Alexandra’s artistic presentation of the elephant, ostrich, buffalo, giraffe and predominantly the regal zebra, swirls about and leaps to her palette in representational form.It is this deep inspiration from the heart of Africa that has emerged in Alexandra’s painting of the wildlife and has evolved into a style that straddles all genre and is uniquely her own.More of Alexandra Spyratos can be found at www.facebook.com/alexandraartart/.

 

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Mark Messersmith

 

Mark Messersmith (1955-)  was born in Kansas City, Missouri lives and works in Tallahassee, Florida where he teaches at Florida State University.

The artist extends beyond the frame of his central images surveying man’s ruin. He also includes a small frieze of vignettes at the bottom and sculptural adornments at the frame’s edge.

His work explores themes of spirit and struggle within the modern world’s natural environments.

Messersmith likes to focus on the habitats of Florida’s animals in the way they live and react to one another.

In his words, “My work is really about our relationship to all other living creatures at this precarious moment, a place midway between hope and despair.”

His works reflect plants and animals, which are still able to survive,  often in small isolated natural habitats, and the effects of their inevitable forced migration, dislocation, or isolation.

His works build on stories (either real or conjectured), along with observations and concerns for the creatures that move within the shrinking environs they inhabit.

More of Mark Messersmith‘s inspirational work can be found at https://markmessersmith.com.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery (flashback) — Svetlana Bobrova

I think one of my favorite Sunday Evening Art Gallery posts was from back in November, 2014, when I shared images from the artist Svetlana Bobrova. A surrealistic artist from Russia, the figures in her paintings are hauntingly beautiful. I cannot get enough of her and her imagination.

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can see more of Svetlana Bobrova‘s amazing work at my Sunday Evening Art Gallery blog or at the blue link above.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn

Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (1606-1669) was a Dutch draughtsman, painter, and printmaker.

An innovative and prolific master, he is generally considered one of the greatest visual artists in the history of art and the most important in Dutch art history.Rembrandt’s works depict a wide range of style and subject matter, from portraits and self-portraits to landscapes, genre scenes, allegorical and historical scenes, and biblical and mythological themes.Rembrandt’s portraits of his contemporaries, self-portraits, and scenes from the Bible are regarded as his greatest creative triumphs.Rembrandt’s foremost contribution in the history of printmaking was his transformation of the etching process from a relatively new reproductive technique into a true art form.He was also an avid art collector and dealer. Rembrandt lived beyond his means, buying art, prints, and rarities, which probably helped his bankruptcy in 1656, by selling most of his paintings and large collection of antiquities which included Old Master paintings and drawings, busts of the Roman Emperors, suits of Japanese armor, and collections of natural history and minerals.Unfortunately, the end of his life was far from the famous painter he would become.Rembrandt died in 1669 in Amsterdam and was buried as a poor man in an unknown grave in the Westerkerk. After twenty years, his remains were taken away and destroyed, as was customary with the remains of poor people at the time.

More of Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn’s amazing life and art can be found at http://www.rembrandtpainting.net/ and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rembrandt.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — James Michalopoulos

Painter and sculptor James Michalopoulos was born in 1951 in Pennsylvania. Michalopoulos received a BA from Bowdoin College. After managing the Boston Food Co-op for two years, he began to sketch. He has never stopped making art.

In 1981 he was drawn to New Orleans as the last bastion of hippie bohemian culture in America.He began sketching artists and musicians, houses and street corners.Fascinated with the duality of beauty and decay, the architecture of the city became his muse.Capturing the spirit and the essence of his subject in layer upon layer of thick impasto paint, a portrait of the city appeared, brimming with color and energy.In the early 1990’s Michalopoulos operated a studio out of Lausanne, Switzerland, and exhibited both there and in Geneva, London and Berlin. Today he divides his time between New Orleans and Burgundy.The French countryside, with its Roman era stone buildings and verdant fields, has become a large focus of his work, but there is nothing better than New Orleans.

More of James Michalopoulos‘  wonderful art can be found at https://www.michalopoulos.com/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get Creative and Share!

Grandkids Get Creative

Today — Every day — is for sharing. Sometimes I’m not up to it, other days I’m buzzing around like a bee with pollen. Today is a pollen day.

I’d like to share some of my blogger friends’ finished artwork. I enjoy following them, and I really appreciate their efforts to bring beauty into the world. I know I might miss some, but that share is for another day. Take a look — follow the links — and enjoy their work for yourself.

 

https://dailyfiberfun.wordpress.com/

 

https://friendlyfairytales.com/

Seeing the same four walls
in this endless
pandemic confinement,
but imagining far fields……………

 

https://ivors20.wordpress.com/

There must be a number of silent masks around

Yesterday an old mask flew away at the speed of sound

From behind, the real pieces of what we perceive……………

 

https://gwenniesgardenworld.wordpress.com/

 

https://chaoticshapes.com/

 

https://anthonygrootelaar.blog/

 

https://rakupottery.ca/

 

https://leafandtwig.wordpress.com/

the flowers’ shadows
write their own poem
on the book’s pages

 

https://brushparkwatercolors.wordpress.com/

 

https://thelonelyauthorblog.com/

i will love you
in the silence of your reflection
in the echoes of your pain………………………….

 

https://rothpoetry.wordpress.com/

Painting // passing time
Waiting for Summer release
Ready for a hug

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Charles Vickery

 

Charles Vickery (1913-1998) was an American painter born in Hinsdale, Illinois.

He is best known for his naturalistic depictions of historic ships in the open ocean and crashing waves in all types of weather and times of day.Vickery studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the American Academy of Fine Arts.Recognized as the “finest seascape artist of our time” by the Los Angeles Maritime Museum, Vickery was known for his dramatic paintings of the sea.Vickery brought a new meaning to the term “marine art” as he submerged himself in the study of the constant interplay of nature — the sun, sky, wind and water all working together.He deeply loved the ocean, saying, “All the colors of water come from the sky because every color of the sky is reflected in that water. And the sky has all the colors of the rainbow in it.”

In his lifetime, Vickery saw his works grace the walls of galleries, embassies and private residences.

More of Charles Vickery‘s masterpieces can be found at https://www.vickeryart.com.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Christine Van Sickle

Christine Van Sickle‘s creative journey started in the early 1990’s. In 1994 she had her first art piece published in the Green Bay Press Gazette, and from then on she was hooked.Van Sickle has always loved the creative process, and later in life it became a much needed escape from the daily stresses of life.Van Sickle’s work includes realism and surrealism pieces. They are often nature inspired,  and  usually start as a normal landscape or animal.She has worked with ink, watercolor, and other mediums, but prefers acrylic on canvas.The artist makes a point to listen and watch other artists. She also encourages others to pick up a brush and try it themselves.

More of Christine Van Sickle‘s artwork can be found at www.cvansicklestudios.com, or her Instagram page https://www.instagram.com/cvansicklestudios/. 

Send inquiries (custom, original art, or print requests) to cvansickle16@gmail.com.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Giovanni Paolo Panini

Giovanni Paolo Panini (1691-1765), a Piacenza-born artist, was a celebrated painter of views of modern and ancient Rome and a prolific architect and draftsman during the eighteenth century.As both painter and teacher, Panini was versatile in his craft and, accordingly, was highly respected for his contribution to the art scene in Italy.Although Panini worked as an architect, designing Cardinal Valenti’s villa and the chapel in Santa Maria della Scala (1728), and produced fireworks, festival apparatuses, and other ephemeral architectural decorations (and painted magnificent records of them), in the last thirty years of his life he specialized in painting the views of Rome that secured his lasting reputation.These were of two main types, vedute prese da i luoghi (carefully and accurately rendered views of actual places) and vedute ideate (imaginary views and combinations of particular buildings and monuments).His views of ancient and modern Rome encompassed practically everything worth noting in the eighteenth-century guidebooks to the Eternal City.

These paintings were not idealized or symbolic representations of Rome’s past and present grandeur, but accurate and objective portrayals of the most famous, most picturesque, or most memorable sights of the city.

More of Giovanni Paolo Panini‘s amazing paintings can be found at museums and websites around the Internet.

The Art of Christmas

Christmas is not a time nor a season, but a state of mind. To cherish peace and goodwill, to be plenteous in mercy, is to have the real spirit of Christmas.
~ Calvin Coolidge

 

Adoration of the Magi, Sandro Botticelli

 

Be Home for Christmas, Thomas Kinkade

 

Christmas Card, Salvador Dali

 

Adoration of the Magi, Albrecht Dürer

 

Merry Christmas Grandma, Norman Rockwell

 

Snow Scene at Aargenteuil, Claude Monet

 

Christmas Card, Andy Warhol

 

Christmas Morning, Thomas Falcon-Marshall

 

We Three Kings, James Christiansen

 

Adoration of the Magi, Peter Paul Rubens

 

Charlie Brown Christmas, Charles Schultz

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Jacob Lawrence

The most widely acclaimed African American artist of this century, and one of only several whose works are included in standard survey books on American art, Jacob Armstead Lawrence has enjoyed a successful career for more than fifty years.Lawrence was born in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in 1917. The son of Southern migrants, he moved with his mother and sister to Harlem in 1930 at age 13.Lawrence’s paintings portray the lives and struggles of African Americans, and have found wide audiences due to their abstract, colorful style and universality of subject matter.He create paintings drawn from the African American experience as well as historical and contemporary themes, such as war, religion, and civil rights.

In 1940, he received a grant from the Rosenwald Foundation to create a 60-panel epic, The Migration of the Negro (now known as The Migration Series).

The panels portray the migration of over a million African Americans from the South to industrial cities in the North between 1910 and 1940. 

He was credited with developing a unique aesthetic known as Dynamic Cubism, which would be attributed, not to European influences, but to “hard, bright, brittle” Harlem.

More of Jacob Lawrence‘s artwork can be found around the Internet including MOMA Lawrence and  Artnet Lawrence.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery on Friday — Tresor Mukonkole

The goal of Tresor Mukonkole’s artistic vision is to illustrate certain complexities, including his artistic point of view, of the world.Mukonkole comes from the Congo, an unstable country on all fronts,  underground rich in minerals, yet full of numerous conflicts between different political and economic factors.From the soil of the Congo, his homeland, his work as an artist is about the analysis of the presence of man on earth, and his impact on everything, especially the environment and the future of nature.Mukonkole says he produces a narrative from his paintings with butterflies in order to express himself on the beauty and the fragility embodied by nature and the earth.His artistic work aims to illustrate his perspective as an artist on the threats to our environment by presenting a glimmer of positivity to replace the darkness.Despite the complexities of his world and his artistic calling, his butterfly paintings are bright and full of life and hope.

More of Tresor Mukonkole‘s beautiful work can be found at http://mukonkole.com/lipekapeka/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Colin Fraser

Colin Fraser is a contemporary Scottish painter known for his detailed still life, landscapes, and interiors.

Fraser has long been established as one of the world’s leading egg tempera painters.

Born in 1957 in Glasgow, United Kingdom, he studied art at Brighton Polytechnic before moving to Sweden in 1981.Fraser’s use of egg-tempera gives his work a light-filled, translucent quality unequaled in other mediums.It is notoriously hard to control and seldom used by contemporary artists.“It’s a medium fraught with technical difficulties, but therein lies its charm. Brushstrokes dry instantly and are never really fully opaque, so just about every mark the painter makes shows,” Fraser has explained.“You can’t force your will on it, it forces you to accept the marks you make and live in the ‘moment’, with each brushstroke that is applied to the panel.”

More of Colin Fraser‘s work can be found at galleries around the Internet.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Sharon Weiser

Sharon Weiser, who grew up in Wisconsin, began painting as a child and went on to receive her Bachelor of Fine Arts and K-12 teaching certificate from the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire.

After living for twenty years in Phoenix, Arizona, Weiser returned to the Midwest where she currently teaches painting and drawing at her studio.Clearly, the time Weiser spent in Arizona left its mark artistically as she continues to create her joyfully close-up cactus compositions.Painting in either oils or acrylics, Weiser works primarily from her own photos – cropping, replacing, re-positioning or enlarging forms to expertly compose her dynamic light-filled canvases.It is bold colors, a remarkable attention to detail and a singular sense of design that makes her paintings stand apart.Her artwork also continues to evolve as her curiosity compels her to keep experimenting with different color palettes, subjects and ideas.Her choice of southern colors reflects the beauty of her surroundings, adding depth and almost a fluorescence to desert life.More of Sharon Weiser‘s beautiful paintings can be found at http://www.sharonweiser.com/.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Juan Gris

José Victoriano (Carmelo Carlos) González-Pérez, better known as Juan Gris (1887-1927) built upon the foundations of early Cubism and steered the movement in new directions.

Gris was a Spanish painter and sculptor born in Madrid who lived and worked in France most of his life.

Cubism is an early 20th-century style and movement in art, especially painting, in which perspective with a single viewpoint was abandoned and use was made of simple geometric shapes, interlocking planes, and, later, collage.

Unlike Picasso and Braque, whose Cubist works were monochromatic, Gris’s chief aim was to please the eye through color.

Often he incorporated newsprint and advertisements into his work, leaving more of the original pieces of ads and newsprint intact, as if to preserve the integrity of the originals. 

Gris’s later works exhibited a greater simplification of geometric structure, a blurring of the distinction between objects and setting, between subject matter and background. 

The clear-cut underlying geometric framework of his work  controls the finer elements of his paintings and their composition, including the small planes of the faces, become part of the unified whole. 

More of Juan Gris‘s wonderful cubism art can be found at http://www.juangris.org/.

 

 

Borrowing From Famous Artists

Where do you get your inspiration from? Not just for your stories, but for your paintings, sketches, for your photography?

I love it that inspiration can hit from any direction at any time.

The other night I watched the excellent 2000 movie Shadow of a Vampire with John Malkovich and Willem Dafoe, about the making of Nosferatu in 1922 (with a twist). At the beginning of the movie there was a collage of drawings, haunting in nature, perhaps from Nosferatu’s castle or medieval tapestries or whatever.

But these images are wonderfully unique. They would make great stories, great watercolors, great backgrounds for other worlds, other ideas. I see some unique inspiration coming from these. Just because they showed up in a horror movie doesn’t mean they have to stay there. I see abstract sketches coming from these; I see a story about an alien or elf magically appearing right in his horse’s path; I see a cross stitch in muted colors and poem about finding the light.

It’s easy to get inspired by walking through the woods, or watching a sunset. But what about an old movie script? Can you paint a picture based on someone else’s idea? Write a story based on someone else’s story line?

I say — why not?

Start with a Monet and end up with a modern lithograph. Start with an old Twilight Zone episode and ended up with a short story. Make a quilt based on  designs from Picasso or Juan Gris. Make a needlepoint based off a Medieval tapestry. Design an outfit that reflects the architecture of the Eiffel Tower. Use a photograph of a city skyline to make a paper cutting.

We are not stealing someone else’s ideas — we are taking their idea, a creation, and putting our own mark on it. Our own version of it. A pen and ink drawing can come from a passage in your favorite book; a sculpture can be inspired by a child’s painting on a school wall.

One of the creative paths I want to re-explore once I retire is painting. I enjoyed it so much so long ago…who knows what ideas will come to mind once I put brush to canvas? I can see me trying out these designs I saw on a vampire movie one night. I can try colorful drips and drops and splatters like the ones I watched Ed Harris, aka Jackson Pollock, made in the movie of the painter’s name.

I have so many things I want to try it makes my head spin.

That’s what I want you to feel. Take a design, a photo, a paragraph from a book and turn it into something of your own. It doesn’t matter if it turns out like you thought — that’s why we experiment. To see what spin we can put on someone else’s reality.

Have you taken other artist’s creations and turned them into  your own? Have you ever watched a movie or a TV show and thought “that’s really unique — I can do something with that….”? Share with us. Give us ideas!

And anyway — it’s not really “borrowing.” You don’t need to give it back.

Maybe I should have said — TRANSFORMING.

Isn’t that much more fun?

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Zdzislaw Beksinski

Zdzislaw Beksinski (1929-2005) was a was a renowned Polish painter, photographer, and fantasy artist.

His work reflected his preference for the obscure.His paintings concocted up odd images in the mind, and were a true step into absurdity in the field of dystopian surrealism.Beksinski was a very innovative artist, especially for one working in a Communist country. In the 1970s he entered what he himself called his “fantastic period”, which lasted up to the late 1980s. This is his best known period, during which he created very disturbing images, showing a surrealistic, post-apocalyptic environment with very detailed scenes of death, decay, landscapes filled with skeletons, deformed figures, deserts, all very detailed, painted with his trademark precision, particularly when it came to rough, bumpy surfaces.  Beksinski’s later years were ones filled with tragedy.  His wife, Zofia, died in 1998, and a year later, on Christmas Eve 1999, his son Tomasz (a popular radio presenter, music journalist and movie translator) committed suicide. Beksiński’s life reached a most brutal and melancholy end in 2005, when he was stabbed to death at his Warsaw apartment by a 19-year-old acquaintance from Wołomin, reportedly because he refused to lend the teenager money.Perhaps his art had always reflected the darkness that one day would reflect the end of his life.More of Zdzislaw Beksinski‘s haunting work can be found at https://www.shopbeksinski.com/

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Raja Ravi Varma

Raja Ravi Varma (1848-1906) was an Indian painter and artist, considered as one of the greatest painters in the history of Indian art.

Ravi Varma is one of the few painters who managed to accomplish a beautiful union of Indian tradition with the techniques of European academic art.

His paintings can be classified into three categories – portraits, portrait-based compositions and theatrical compositions based on myths and legends. It is the third category of paintings for which Raja Ravi Varma is most renowned.

Raja Ravi Varma is known for his amazing paintings, which revolve mainly around the Puranas (ancient mythological stories) and the great Indian epics – Mahabharata and Ramayana.

 He is sometimes regarded as the first modern Indian artist due to his ability to reconcile Western aesthetics with Indian iconography.

This is one of the reasons why he is considered as one of the most, if not the most prominent Indian painters.

His paintings are full of color and life, sprung from a world most of us are not familiar with.

Hopefully sharing this beautiful art will change all of that.

More of Raja Ravi Varma‘s marvelous paintings can be found at  https://ravivarma.org/  or https://tinyurl.com/y4s79c54. 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery on Friday — Valerio D’Ospina

 

There is something surrealistic about Valerio D’Ospina’s dramatic artwork.

Looking at the city scapes, one feels as if they are moving forward in time, glimpsing life as it blurs past the window.

D’Ospina was born in Italy, but now lives and works in Pennsylvania.

The artist paints gritty scenes from industry including ship yards, trains, and urbanscapes.

D’Ospina also finds beauty in industrial transportation, specifically oil tankers and old locomotives that lumber into rail yards or sit docked in harbors with a captivating sense of dignity.

His perspective has an edge of starkness to them, as his brush strokes streak across the canvas.

It is a sharp, beautiful, unique way to view the world.

More of Valerio D’Ospina‘s work can be found at https://www.valeriodospina.com/.

 

 

Painting Is Easy…Not

I was reading posts I follow, and came across  Carsten Wieland’s watercolor paintings. I have highlighted his work here on Humoring the Goddess and on my Sunday Evening Art Gallery blog before, so you are kind of familiar with his work.

But I have to repost this here this afternoon. If you have three minutes, watch the video of him painting the ship. He makes the creative process look so easy, so simple.

That is what real artists do.

I am speechless. For I know that’s not true.

 

WATERCOLOR ON INGRES PAPER 2

https://brushparkwatercolors.wordpress.com/2019/09/11/watercolor-on-ingres-paper-2/