Showing Off the Gallery

Good Evening!

Just opened another gallery over at Sunday Evening Art Gallery, and running through all the different galleries, I decided to show off a few of the images you didn’t see here. It is my hope that you wander over to and take a look at the wonderfully creative artists I’ve come across.. These people blow my mind. I hope that if you’re not following me over there, you’ll think about it. I have a ton of artists waiting for Sundays here, then exploding in their glory over at the SEAG. Come and stay a while!



Craig Haupt


Library Interiors


Faberge Eggs


Kevin Zuckerman

Rita Faes


Spencer Biles

Tal Peleg


Unmasked Group


Willard Wigan


Natalya Sots


Le Chat Noir


Svetlana Bobrova






Mihai Criste




Jennifer Maestre



Maud Vantours




Wine Glasses

Water Drops


Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Ellie Davies

Ellie Davies has have been working in UK forests for the past eight years, making work which explores the complex interrelationship between the landscape and the individual.

Davies notes UK forests have been shaped by human processes over thousands of years and include ancient woodlands, timber forestry, wildlife reserves and protected Areas of Outstanding Natural.

As such, forests are potent symbols in folklore, fairy tale and myth, places of enchantment and magic as well as of danger and mystery.

Against this backdrop, Davies’ work explores the ways in which identity is formed by the landscapes we live and grow up in.

The forest becomes a studio, forming a backdrop to contextualize the work, so that each piece draws on its location, a golden tree introduced into a thicket shimmers in the darkness, painted paths snake through the undergrowth, and strands of wool are woven between trees mirroring colors and formal elements within the space.

More of Ellie Davies’ fantastic photography can be found at


Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Izumi Akinobu

Tokyo-based artist Izumi Akinobu creates amazing miniature worlds encased in tiny glass bottles.


Izumi is an architectural model designer by day and a craft artist in her spare time.

She has been creating these wonderful bottles since 2010.

More of  Izumi Akinobu‘s tiny creations can be found at 


Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Kris Kuski

Born March 2nd 1973,  Kris Kuski spent his youth in rural seclusion and isolation along with a blue-collar working mother, two much older brothers and absent father.Open country, sparse trees, and later alcoholic stepfathers, perhaps paved the way for an individual saturated in imagination and introversion.

His fascination with the unusual lent to his macabre art later in life. The grotesque to him as it seemed, was beauty.

 His work shows the corrupt and demoralized fall of modern-day society, a place where new beginnings, new wars, new philosophies, and new endings all exist.

Through his intricate 3-D sculptural work, we see both the beautiful and dark side of our minds.

Kris’s work is intricate, fascinating, and incredibly mesmerizing. Look close, look often.

More of Kris Kuski‘s work can be found at 


The Gallery Is Reopening on Thursday Evenings!!

Well, I guess today was the last day I can wear my heavy-duty sweater as an outer garment. With temps hanging around 25 to 30 degrees, even my hot flashes won’t hold up against the chill and wind.

And speaking of chill, and cold, and snow, and sleet (were we really talking about all that?) I have been searching for a new name for my sometimes-Thursday evening art gallery. I am finding so many fantastic artists that I just can’t help sharing them more than once a week.

I hope you don’t mind.

So thinking of the depths of winter that is soon to arrive, I thought of soft music, crackling fires, and rooms full of art. Cinnamon and apple and spice potpourri and mulled wine or shots of Rumchata. So with thoughts of snuggling and armchair tours around the gallery, I’ve decided.

Art Around the Fireplace

Or should it be…

Thursday Art Gallery Around the Fire

Or maybe…

Sunday Evening Art Gallery on Thursdays In Front of the Fire

You see why I have trouble with subject lines for emails at work…

You all are a delight. I hope you enjoy the unique art as much as I do. And if you ever want to see more of these artists, THE gallery is open 24/7.

Here is a preview of what’s in store this winter in the Gallery….

Faerie Houses


Kris Kuski


Rick Satava


Eiffel Tower

Hope you keep visiting the Goddess AND the Gallery!

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Remedios Varo

Remedios Varo  (1908-1983)  was born in Spain. She fled the Spanish Civil War and headed to Paris to further her artistry in Surrealism

. The surrealist movement was strong there, and she honed her skills along with painters who received more notoriety.

Remedios always struggled to combine the mythic with the scientific, the sacred with the profane. She was influenced by the surrealist movement and  metaphysics studies, along with ancient studies.

After some years, she decided to move to Mexico with a friend she met in Europe, where her real journey as an artist started.

Her characters are mystical and solitary; most of the times involved in scientific activities.

 As an artist, she liked to use symbolism and hidden elements such as animals (mainly cats) in her paintings, along with diverse characters who are contemplative, passive, or highly symbolic.

More of Remedios Varo‘s artwork can be found at



A Virtual Art Gallery at your Fingertips!

Friday the 13th. Spooky for some, lucky for others.

My black (and white) cat and I are taking the opportunity this day to promote my other blog, SUNDAY EVENING ART GALLERY.

I have added a lot of additional images to each artist’s base. When I first introduce the artists here on Sunday nights, it’s often hard to pick just 5 or 6 of their masterpieces.

That’s what the Gallery is for.

So when you are in need of that “wow…how do they DO that?” moment, pop on over to the other side. Better yet, sign up to follow the blog. It doesn’t fill your mailbox full of fluff junk mail; just notices when I open a new gallery. Which is at least once a week.

Come on — take a chance. It’s a fun world to explore.


     Latchezar Boyadjiev





















   Unusual Hotels




















            Stained Glass








Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Seung Hoon Park

Seung Hoon Park, an artist from Seoul, S. Korea, is creating the most unusual images with the use of a camera and threading the film to mimic the look of woven textiles.

Born in 1978, Seung Hoon Park lives and works in Seoul, South Korea.

Part collage, part photography, part tapestry, these fragmented interpretations of iconic buildings and landmarks are truly something to ponder over.

 Each image begins with 8mm or 16mm camera film strips which he lays down in rows to create a larger surface that effectively acts as a single piece of film.

Park then exposes two images in a large format 8×10″ camera using sets of vertical and horizontal strips which are woven together to create a final print.

The final image is a blend of mediums: both photograph as well as woven textile; by threading the film together, Park creates beautifully captivating scenes with textured distortions.

Park has traveled to locations around the world including Rome, Milan, Venice and Prague to shoot images for his ongoing series titled Textus.
More of  Seung Hoon Park’s fascinating photography art can be found at . and .

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Cecelia Webber

Cecelia Webber uses the human body to construct intricate tessellations that represent the natural world.

Her art implicates the viewer in its form, evoking our complex relationship with our bodies and nature. Her art has been featured around the world.

Each composition can take up to two months to produce, and involves photographing scores of poses; digitally cutting, rotating, and coloring the resulting images; and assembling all of the components together into the finished piece.

Because even slight nuances of colour and form become magnified in their final context, Webber frequently takes more than fifty photographs of a single pose to achieve the desired form.

The artist also regularly uses herself as a subject, setting a camera timer and then orienting herself for the photograph.

Webber’s deep appreciation for nature, along with her scientific background, gives her a deep awareness of organic forms that she draws upon to concoct pieces bearing a unique interplay between colors, shapes, and models’ bodies.

More of Cecelia Webber‘s magnificent art can be found at








Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Motohiko Odani

Sometimes an artist’s description by others is as mesmerizing as their art.

Motohiko Odani (1972-) was born and raised in Kyoto, Japan, and received his MFA from Tokyo University of the Arts in 1997.

According to one creative description, “Odani, who possesses a keenly critical understanding of sculpture, has resisted (or taken advantage of) the medium’s conventional image of weightiness or substance.”

“Instead, he has given physical representation to ‘phantoms’ – entirely ephemeral sensations or amorphous phenomena.”

Odani’s works are comprised of complex layers of meaning that defy a singular interpretation, as the artist draws inspiration from various sources including horror and sci-fi films, Japanese folklore, Buddhism, and Futurism.

This last description matches Motohiko’s intrinsic art:  “With Odani’s artworks transcending the conventional idea of sculpture and seeking to give visual representation to existence itself, this exhibition pursues new possibilities for artistic expression.”

I think that’s a perfect description.

More of Motohiko Odani‘s amazing art can be found at and

Coming Attractions

My research folders for my Sunday Evening Art Gallery are bursting at the seams with new creative artists! I am so psyched at the amazing talents I’ve found that I’m almost tempted to open a second evening’s showing — Thursday Evening Wine and Art Gallery or Thursday Tea and Art or Thursday Evening Art Walk something like that.  (Suggestions are welcome!)

Here is a peek of coming attractions:

Tell your family — tell your friends — every Sunday evening, and perhaps every Thursday evening, you will find magical art and artists here at Humoring the Goddess, then in excess at the Sunday Evening Art Gallery.

My creative artists will thank you.

Sharing Is The Best Kind of Blogging

Every now and then karma comes back and makes me feel great.

Karma refers to the spiritual principle of cause and effect where intent and actions of an individual (cause) influence the future of that individual (effect). Sometimes we hope karma comes back and kicks butt to the meanies of the world. Other times we hope that because we’ve been good or loving that we can win the lottery.

Sometimes something I’ve blogged circles around and shines sunshine back in my face. Last December my Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog showcased Collin van der Sluijs , a muralist painter from the Netherlands. A few months later there was a comment from the website Life in Maastricht who asked if they could use info from my blog to showcase Collin, as he was from Maastricht too.  Their  website has been part of the Netherlands social media communities since June 2015, covering news and stories about one of the most beautiful cities in the Netherlands. Of course I said yes.

They later stated, “…contacted Collin and he’s happy to participate, thank you for your post, otherwise I wouldn’t have found him.”

So imagine. I got to learn about a town named Maastricht in a country half way around the world, and helped their website find and highlight a homeboy. To me, that’s karma.

Check out their great website — — and share the magic!

THAT’s what blogging’s all about.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Steve Axford

Australian photographer Steve Axford ventures into forested areas near his home in New South Wales to photograph the unusual forms of fungi, slime molds, and lichens he finds growing there.

The permutations in color, shape, and size found in each specimen are a testament to the radical diversity of living creatures found in just a small area.

A handful of the images seen here, namely the “hairy” fungi called Cookeina Tricholoma, were photographed last year on a trip to Xishuangbanna, China and Chiang Mai, Thailand.

His amazing photography catches images of fungi most have never seen.

Steve lives and works in the Northern Rivers area of New South Wales in Australia where he often travels to remote locations to document the living world around him.

The delicacy and uniqueness of the fungi is beyond imagination.

It’s his work tracking down some of the world’s strangest and brilliantly diverse mushrooms and other fungi that has resulted in an audience of followers who wait to see what he’s captured next.

More of Steve Axford‘s amazing photography can be found at Flicker


Exploration at the Art Gallery

When you work inside an office all week, one tends to fist pump the air when the weekend comes and the weather is beautiful. So I expect all of you to go outside and fist pump today, then when you come in this evening, put on some great relaxing music and come visit the Sunday Evening Art Gallery.

It’s easy to follow, and the art I’m coming across is so wonderfully beautiful and unique. I’m adding galleries all the time, plus adding more images to the ones I have.  Tell your friends! Say, “Man, have you checkout out that Sunday Evening Art Gallery? Man, that art is so awesome!” (or something to that effect…)

Happy Saturday!

Mihai Criste
Liu Bolon
Ice Sculptures
Guido Daniele


Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Maud Vantours

Maud Vantours was born in 1985 in France.

A graduate from the Parisian school Duperré, Maud follows a Design training with a specialization in textiles and materials research.

Color, material and patterns have an important place in her work, like paper, which became her favorite material.

She sculpts it in 3D layer after layer, by superimposing paper and colors to create inspired patterns in volume.

Maud’s work transcending a simple material and transforming it into a work of art.

Her design creations are original graphics of multicolored and dreamlike landscapes.

Her patience and intricate skills shine in every piece of artwork she creates.

More of Maud Vantour‘s intricate works can be found at





Don’t Do It Just Because Everyone Does It

street-arts-animationThe other day a friend asked me why I didn’t put my Sunday Evening Art Gallery on Pinterest. After all, there is a larger audience, and it would get better coverage.

This is probably true. When one writes something, one hopes a lot of people will read it and like it and share it. It’s true. It’s the same when you write a book, or paint a painting. You want people to see what you see, feel what you feel.

But what you wrap your creativity in says a lot about you, too. The colors you choose, the things you sketch, all showcase your views on love, life — everything that makes us human.

We all have dreams of how we want our world to be. Most times we fall short. Not a big deal. We all can’t live in our dreams. But we can create our dreams. We can create atmosphere, characters, life, death, love — anything we want. Any way we want.

When I think of art galleries I think of the Art Institute in Chicago, or Blue Spiral 1 Gallery in Asheville, NC I visited last August. I think of the special care galleries take to showcase their artists. The way they display collections and single pieces. Pottery, sketchings, paintings, steel work — all stand out on their own because of the way they are wrapped in creativity.

That’s why I created the Sunday Evening Art Gallery.

I created a space that feels classic and comfortable and is open 24 hours a day. You can have a cup of coffee in the morning and wander through one of the galleries, or a glass of wine in the evening and catch three or four.

The art is unique. Amazing. Styles most people have never seen.

Why post it side-by-side with dozens of other posters? Why let the beauty, the fun, the uniqueness get lost in everyone else’s shadow?

The same is true for whatever you create. Don’t use the colors everyone else uses; don’t make the same shapes, the same poetry that everyone else does. Not unless you love what everyone else does. Put your own spin on your dreams. Color and paint the world the way you see it — the way you want others to see it. Do it your way!

And let me know where to find you and your dreams. I’m always looking forward to learning, seeing, discovering something — and someone — new!

P.S. Do stop by the Gallery — bring a glass of chocolate milk with you and stay a while!

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Fractals

In the mind’s eye, a fractal is a way of seeing infinity.
~~James Gleick
A fractal is a never-ending pattern.
Fractals are infinitely complex patterns that are self-similar across different scales.
They are created by repeating a simple process over and over in an ongoing feedback loop.
Geometrically, they exist in between our familiar dimensions.
Fractal patterns are extremely familiar, since nature is full of fractals.
Fractal: A set which is larger than the universe.
~Soumya Prakash Sahu


Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Jen Stark


Jen Stark (1983 -) is a contemporary artist whose majority of work involves creating paper sculptures.


Her artwork mimics intricate patterns and colors found in nature while exploring ideas of replication and infinity.


Stark takes construction or acid-free colored paper and intricately cuts each sheet with an X-acto knife, layering the paper into a topographical landscape of color and bold shapes.


Stark’s works have been inspired by many things around the natural world such as infinity, topographical maps, fractals, designs in nature, microscopic patterns, wormholes and sliced anatomy.


In her own words, “I love thinking about how enormous shapes out in the universe can have the same patterns as tiny microorganisms under a microscope.”


“How geometric shapes and certain spiraling patterns apply to designs in nature big and small.”


More of Jen Stark‘s work can be found at

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Collin van der Sluijs



Collin van der Sluijs is a renowned painter and illustrator from Maastricht, The Netherlands.


After graduation from the art academy at St. Joost in 2004, Collin moved to the south of the Netherlands where he now lives and works on exhibitions and projects.

collin-van-der-sluijs1 His work can be described as personal pleasures and struggles in daily life.


Working without sketches or notes, the artist dives into each artwork with spray paint, acrylics, and ink as ideas take hold and images slowly emerge.


Collin’s art also includes fascinating wall murals.

collinvandersluijs_morenhoek_02-940x623He frequently examines themes of the natural world such as the cycle of life, the depictions of various species of birds, and the psychology of beings both human and animalistic.


 More of Collin van der Sluijs’ art can be found at Collosal or at his website Collin van der Sluijs .

Keep Warm With a Visit to the Sunday Evening Art Gallery

Snowed in this weekend?

Need a break from writing your novel?

Bored with TV? Radio?

Come take a break at the Sunday Evening Art Gallery!

A number of galleries have recently been updated, bringing you more of the extraordinary art that makes the Gallery a popular stop-by gallery.

Here are a few examples of unusual and fascinating art:

Luke Jerram  


Jackson Pollock




Mihai Criste




It’s the kind of world you can visit again and again. There are images there for inspiration, for daydreams, and for sharing with friends.

Stay warm — fill a goblet with wine or chocolate milk, put some easy-listening music on in the background, and stroll through the magic of the Sunday Evening Art Gallery.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Marina Printseva

Talented and unique artist Marina Printseva was born in 1949 in the city of Pskov, Russia.


She is a member of the Union of Artists of Russia, and a member of the International design and textiles Association.


Her technique is a brilliant mixture of embroidery, painting and application.


Marina created a special world filled with poetic images and metaphors influenced by Old World St. Petersburg


Her work is populated by visions and shadows from the past.


You can tell by the delicate work and mixed media that her visions are intricate and true.


You can find more of Marina Printseva‘s inspirational work at Marina Printseva and unique-art-by-marina-printseva.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Pierre Brissaud


Pierre Brissaud  (1885- 1964) was a French illustrator, painter, and a prominent figure of French Art Deco.


He created illustrations for publications Les Feuillets d’Art, La Gazette du Bon Ton, Fortune, House & Garden, Vanity Fair, and Vogue.


Many of his illustrations are realistic leisure scenes of the well-to-do.


From the mid-1920 to the early 1930’s, Pierre Brissaud was known for his stencil prints meant for magazine covers and advertising.


Not only did Brissaud created prints and posters for fashion houses, but he also did book illustrations including Manon Lescaut, Two Gentlemen of Verona, and Madame Bovary.


It is through his creative artistry that the reflections of elegance of days gone by are preserved.


More about Pierre Brissaud can be found at

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Pysanky Eggs

A pysanka, or Pysanky Egg, is a Ukrainian Easter Egg decorated with traditional Ukrainian folk designs.


The word pysanka comes from the verb pysaty, “to write”, as the designs are not painted on, but written with beeswax.


Ukrainians have been decorating eggs, creating these miniature jewels, for countless generations.

There is a ritualistic element involved, magical thinking, a calling out to the gods and goddesses for health, fertility, love, and wealth.


The pysanky was believed to possess an enormous power not only in the egg itself, which harbored the nucleus of life, but also in the symbolic designs and colors which were drawn upon the egg in a specific manner.


The symbolic ornamentation of the pysanky consists of geometric motifs, with some animal and plant elements.


The intricately colored eggs were used for various social and religious occasions and were considered to be a talisman, a protector against evil, as well as harbingers of good.

Pysanky Ukrainian Easter Eggs

This magical craft has brought the world another dimension of beauty, creativity, and fine art.

Pysanky Ukrainian Easter Eggs


Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Chemistry Cat

Chemistry Cat, also known as Science Cat, is a series of puns and science jokes appearing as captions around a cat behind some chemistry glassware wearing black rimmed glasses and a red bow tie.


While the source of the image remains a mystery, it is likely a stock photograph, possibly of Russian origin.


This wonderfully serious cat with a quick wit has changed the face of Chemistry.


Chemistry Cat puts a smile on scientists and non-scientists alike.


And isn’t that the purpose of Art?


To bring enjoyment and a smile into your life?



Sparkles from the Gallery on a Sparkling Saturday

It’s a beautiful Fall day outside today — cool temperatures, bright sunshine, the falling leaves whispering a sigh of sleep as they fall in a pile at the bottom of their trees. It’s a perfect day to be out and about, or sitting and writing, as long as life and sunshine are abundant.

I thought you might enjoy visiting some sparkles at the Sunday Evening Art Gallery this afternoon or this evening as well, so here are a few links and their sparkling companions.


Dale Chiluly

Luke Jerram

Ice Sculptures



Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Anton Seminov

There are times when an artist’s view of reality is frightening.


Anton Semenov is a 28-year-old digital painter and graphic designer born and raised in Bratsk, Russia.


He is a digital painter, graphic designer, and, according to some, bringer of nightmares.


His unique surrealistic style and phenomenal attention to detail and preciseness has crafted his technique into truly his own dark vision of the world around us.


As in all nightmares, there is something fascinating about the way his mind wraps around the darkness and breathes life into it, bringing them into the daylight.


His works feature unique interpretations of the subconscious world.


We might not always feel comfortable with his interpretations, but we are thankful he is able to create that which we fear to share.


More of Anton Semenov’s work can be found at  and

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Dreamcatchers




An ancient Chippewa tradition
The dream net has been made


For many generations
Where spirit dreams have played.


Hung above the cradle board,
Or in the lodge up high,


The dream net catches bad dreams,
While good dreams slip on by.


Bad dreams become entangled
Among the sinew thread.


Good dreams slip through the center hole,
While you dream upon your bed.


This is an ancient legend,
Since dreams will never cease,

Hang this dream net above your bed,
Dream on, and be at peace.


  First People

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Riusuke Fukahori

Riusuke Fukahori is known best for his resin-based studies of Japanese goldfish.


Riusuke Fukahori does it so realistically you never imagine that this is just his 3D art form of goldfish, captured as if time stood still.


Fukahori alternates between pouring resin into a vessel and painting goldfish with acrylic paint, giving the resulting work a three-dimensional optical effect.

Most of his works are contained in conventional household items, such as cups and bowls.


The artist was initially attracted to his goldfish because he admired them and viewed their domestication as a metaphor for the stifling conditions of modern life.


Though he infamously keeps dozens of fish around his studio for observation, Fukahori prefers to execute his works from his impressions and memories, and depicts both existing species of fish and invented hybrids.


As  Fukahori states, “I didn’t invent resin and not the first to use resin. I am not a resin artist. I am a goldfish artist.”

And as one can see, Riusuke Fukahori does so in exquisite beauty and detail.

More fantastic art by Riusuke Fukahori can be found on his Facebook page, A fantastic video of Riusuke performing his art can be found at Riusuke Fukahori.


Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Harps

The Harp that once through Tara’s halls

  The soul of music shed,


Now hangs as mute on Tara’s walls

  As if that soul were fled.


So sleeps the pride of former days,

  So glory’s thrill is o’er,


And hearts, that once beat high for praise,

  Now feel that pulse no more.

No more to chiefs and ladies bright

  The harp of Tara swells:

The chord alone, that breaks at night,

Its tale of ruin tells.


Thus Freedom now so seldom wakes,

  The only throb she gives,

Is when some heart indignant breaks,

  To show that still she lives.


Thomas Moore (1779–1852)

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Gustav Klimt

Gustav Klimt (1862-1918) was the leading figure of the so-called Vienna Secession, an art movement that rebelled against the established art concepts and introduced a new style similar to Art Nouveau.


To bring more abstract and purer forms to the designs of buildings and furniture, glass and metalwork, the group  gave birth to another form of modernism in the visual arts and they named their own new movement: Secession.


Klimt was seen as an artist who was far ahead of his time.


Much of the work that was produced during the Austrian born artist’s career, however, was seen as controversial.


Although symbolism was used in many of his art forms, it was not at all subtle, and it went far beyond what the imagination during the time frame accepted.


Klimt’s primary subject was the female body, and his works bordered on eroticism.


Although his work was not widely accepted during his time, some of the pieces that Gustav Klimt did create during his career are today seen as some of the most important and influential pieces to come out of Austria.


More of Gustav Klimt’s work can be found at and

New Galleries Open at the Gallery!!

As we head into the “Last Vacation Weekend of the Summer”, I want to show off a couple of new Sunday Evening Galleries I’ve added recently.  I have to admit the images are stunning, the artwork remarkable. Please go check them out if you get time!





Face Off







Natalya Sots




See you on the other side of Reality!

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Richard Preston

Talented Canadian artist Richard Preston has been experimenting with textures and shapes all his life.

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In 1979  Preston began to establish West Coast Jacket – the first in a series of military jackets.


Beading or embroidering them, he creates a different story or on every jacket.


Army clothing embroidered with the sun, clouds, scattering stars, river flows, flowers (including a lush pink wreath on the head of the skeleton symbolizing death), and  designs with a touch of psychedelic aesthetics, makes a strong and rather contradictory impression, turning each jacket – originally impersonal thing – in a unique and truly conceptual object.


Preston, working with new material, draws attention to global problems, in particular, demilitarization.


Preston does not limit himself by the narrow direction in art, trying himself as a painter, sculptor, designer, photographer, writer, actor, and musician.


One of his hobbies was working with beads, and for nearly thirty years he made original creations, filled with real ethnic motifs and vibrant energies of the author.


A series “stratigraphy” is devoted to geology. With ribbons, threads and beads, the artist tried to show different periods of his work, as well as layers of different rocks of the earth tells the story of its formation.


More of Richard Preston’s work can be found at and at


Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Atmosphere, Art and the Biltmore — Part 3

George Vanderbilt’s 250-room French Renaissance chateau is a true marvel, the largest undertaking in residential architecture. Over a six-year period, an entire community of craftsmen came together to create America’s premier home and the environmental wonderland that surrounded it.


…original art by Pierre-Auguste Renoir and John Singer Sargent..magnificent 16th century tapestries, a Library with 10,000 volumes, a Banquet Hall with a 70-foot ceiling, 35 bedrooms, an indoor pool, and a bowling alley. Almost all of the priceless objects that you see throughout the house are from George and Edith Vanderbilt’s original collection.  ~~ Biltmore Estate History


Can you imagine a world where you could wander room to room and constantly be dazzled by antique furniture, paintings, tapestries, crystal, and more?


Can you imagine a world where servants attend your every need?


Flowers burgeoning from every garden, fires crackling from 65 different fireplaces, and lavish dinners on the Vanderbilts’ burgundy-and-gold-bordered china made in England by Minton and Spode Copeland, silver flatware featuring an engraved Old English pattern from Frances Higgins, London, 1894, and delicate, feather-light crystal from Baccarat. (~~A Very Biltmore Thanksgiving).


It was a different time, a different world, far removed from the air and light we breathe today.


Everyone should visit a castle once in their lifetime.


We may not want to live there, but we can, for a brief moment, experience the opulance of days gone by.



All photographs were taken by Claudia Anderson,© 2016.


Read all about the Biltmore Estate at

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Karina Llergo

We should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once. 
―  Friedrich Nietzsche


Karina Llergo works to find fresh ways to evoke energy through human motion by turning human figures into fluid art.


Dance, air and water are big influences her work.

Figurative Abstract woman dancer painting

According to Karina, “From dancers I take the beautiful mobility of their bodies, from air, its provoking rhythmic motion and from water, its captivating deconstructed reflections.”


“I know a piece is completed when I close my eyes and feel its rhythm of dance, water and air singing in harmony.”


As a lifelong dancer, competitive swimmer and avid skydiver, she found herself drawn to depicting on canvas the palpable energy of the human body in motion.

Figurative flamenco woman red dancer painting

Of Mexican, Armenian and Spanish descent, Karina’s diverse background influences her life in every way, as does her insatiable passion for the creative arts.


More of  Karina Llergo‘s gorgeous artwork can be found at her website

You can also find Karina on Facebook and



Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Jacek Yerka

Jacek Yerka was born in Toruń, Poland, in 1952.


Yerka studied fine art and graphics prior to becoming a full-time artist in 1980.

As a child, Yerka loved to draw and make sculptures. He hated playing outside, and preferred to sit down with a pencil, creating and exploring his own world.


Yerka resisted pressures of his instructors to adopt the less detailed techniques of contemporary art and continued to work in the classic, meticulous Flemish style he still favors to this day.

He creates surrealistic compositions Based on precise painting techniques, taking pattern from former masters like Jan van Eyck or Hieronymus Bosch.

Like many artists, Yerka pulls on thoughts and memories of his past to create these marvelous artworks.


Yerka’s carefully rendered paintings (acrylics on canvas) are filled with images from the artist’s childhood, one heavily influenced by the surroundings of his home during the 1950’s, and his grandmother’s kitchen, where he spent much of his time.


According to Yerka, “My greatest source of inspiration is always (and I bet will be) my childhood souvenirs – that places, remembered feelings, fragrances and technique of 1950s .”

jacek_yerka_gardens_sad poziomkowy

More of Jacek Yerka‘s wonderful art can be found at the Morpheus Gallery  and at his website


Tuesday-Not-Sunday-Evening Art-Gallery-Humor-Blog

They-Wait-in-Silence-4f6276864bf58_hiresI’m sure you’ve seen these posts on Facebook that show a wonderfully huge mansion in the woods/on the water/at the edge of the mountains, and the post says, “If you could live without WiFi and a phone and TV, etc., would you live here?”

Having spent the last five days up Nort’ , I think I can answer a solid “No.”

It wasn’t a mansion; it was a little house we call “The Cabin.” No TV, no Dish/Direct TV, no WiFi, just a DVD/8 Track Player and a radio. For getaway purposes it was ideal. But the times I tried to go online to do some Art Gallering, the signal from my phone was  烂摊子. A mess. So my wildly popular (I love adding my own adjectives) Sunday Evening Art Gallery had to take a Sunday night break.

I also wanted to spend some free time looking for unique artists, following a few leads from friends and followers (I’m always open for suggestions!). Grandkids were out playing, men fishing, cool breeze in the window, quiet except for the sounds of nature, it was a perfect Art Moment.

Yet I could not load any page other than the main one I landed on. No pictures, no links. And I felt like those people who can’t go to the bathroom without their cell phone. I felt helpless. And more than that — pathetic.

During this contemplation time I had a few revelations, too. I think we all get messages from the beyond…all get an idea which direction we should go. But we don’t listen. We — our ego — knows better. So we butt our heads against the wall and keep trying to recast the same pot.

What works for you? What feels right? What feels out-of-sorts? Are you happy with your blog? Are you happy with your craft? Would you sometimes rather do B than A? K rather than E?

I have found a new love affair with Unique Art. There are so many wonderful, unique, unusual artists sharing their work with the world that I’ve never heard of, never seen, never imagined until these past few years. And the thrill I get out of sharing them with you is the same thrill I get when I’ve written something good.

I can feel that same energy when I talk with people who are hooked into some sort of creativity. Their eyes glow, their breath shortens, and their dreams spill out through their words.

I want you to have that glow, too. I want you to sparkle like the fireworks on the 4th of July every time you think of your craft. You will crash and burn and agonize and think and dance and fly. But you will grow and learn and sparkle, too.

I suppose I will wait to introduce a new artist to the Sunday Evening Art Gallery. No need to rush amazement, is there? But because I can’t go long without sharing some kind of art, I will publish a new Gallery.

Don’t go too long without doing your creative thing, too!

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Sue Benner

While pursuing a degree in molecular biology and masters in biomedical illustration, Sue Benner created her vision of the microscopic universe in painted and quilted textile constructions.


She creates her richly layered quilt canvases by collaging her dye-painted and printed silks with recycled textiles to form wonderful works of art.


Sue is a recognized innovator in her field, having developed new techniques in fused quilt construction to further the expression of her ideas.


According to Benner, “My love affair with fabric began with my first memories of the clothes my mother made me, recalling exact hue, fiber content, and weave. In the ensuing years, my mother taught me to sew, carefully and creatively. “


“I see a direct connection between the concept of quilt and the assembly of units to make a larger whole.”


“I revel in the simple act of placing one fabric next to another.”


More of Sue Benner’s fantastic creations can be found on her website

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Bořek Šípek

Bořek Šípek (June 14, 1949 – February 13, 2016) was a Czech architect and designer.

After studying furniture design at the Art School in Prague, architecture at the Art School in Hamburg, and philosophy in Stuttgart,  Šípek finished his doctorate in architecture.

He taught industrial design and architecture, then started his own studio for design and architecture in Amsterdam and Prague.


Bořek Šípek has always felt like an architect more than a designer.


Šípek explains, “I try to interpret new contexts in a new way. It is much closer to me to newly explain something that has roots than to experiment.”


His fantastic works can be found in important museums in Europe, Japan and America, among others.


Bořek Šípek is a master of glass, chandeliers, lamps, carafes, wall hangings, all manners of creative art.


 But for this round, I treat you with his tables.

More of Bořek Šípek‘s beautiful work can be found at and


Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Wolf Kahn

The unique blend of Realism and the formal discipline of Color Field painting sets the work of Wolf Kahn (1927-) apart.



His convergence of light and color has been described as combining pictorial landscapes and painterly abstraction.


It is precisely Kahn’s fusion of color, spontaneity and representation that has produced such a rich and expressive body of work.


Splitting his time between his studios in New York and Vermont, Kahn renders his pastoral surroundings with a mixture of abstraction and representation and with a keen attentiveness to light and color.


These lush, vibrant, oil-on-canvas paintings read as studies of form and color as much as meditations on the landscapes he has come to understand so well—and has helped others to know, too.


Kahn offers some advice that, perhaps, might be of value to a younger generation of painters. “In order to make a living as an artist, you’ve got to be one of two things: A very nice guy, or a bad egg.”


From the deft touch of his paintings, Wolf Kahn is definitely the first.



Wolf Kahn’s amazing art can be found at

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Szymon Klimek

Szymon Klimek was born in Poznań, Poland in 1954 of a family blessed with artistic abilities.

Szymon’s creations are fully functional machines, not bits and pieces tossed together to look like machines.

Made from 0.1 millimeter sheets of brass and bronze, Klimek’s miniature machines dance effortlessly in wine glass enclosures than measure little more than 4 inches across.

A typical miniature requires two or three months of work from starting the drawings to finishing the device.

But the most difficult step, according to Klimek, is installation of the miniature into a glass goblet.

From the start, the miniatures are designed to fit within a spherical glass goblet having an inside diameter of 112 mm (4.4 in), a height of 142 mm (5.6 in), and a mouth opening of 86 mm (3.4 in).

He manually forms the shapes (no fancy machine tools) and glues them together before applying a clear lacquer finish.


More of Szymon Klimek‘s fantastic machine work  can be found at and at his website

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Judit Czinkné Poór

When is a cookie not a cookie?


When it is an amazing creation by Judit Czinkné Poór.


Chef Judit Czinkné Poór is the mastermind behind Hungarian cake decorating shop Mézesmanna, a small studio with a giant social media presence because of the incredible photos and videos they share of their decorative confections.



Each cookie is hand painted, the patterns often traditional patterns from folk costumes and embroideries from her native Hungary.



Judit’s deft touch makes edible creations that are almost too beautiful to eat.


Her embroidery style touches on portraiture, animals, intricate lacework, winter holidays, and floral patterns.


In addition to the folk art-inspired cookies, Poór also decorates cookies with portraits and 3D images.

A true artist, Judit Czinkné Poór and her magic can be found on her Facebook page,, and one of many feature interviews,

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Richard Stainthorp

English artist Richard Stainthorp captures the beautiful energy and fluidity of the human body using wire.


Wire is not automatically what one would consider as a ‘material’ for creating solid, three dimensional sculptures.

wire sculpture1

But Stainthorp has been making wire sculptures since 1996.


The life-sized sculptures feature both figures in motion and at rest, expressed in the form of large-gauged strands that are densely wrapped around and through one another.


Stainthorp also allows the bent wires to shine by keeping their metallic appearance free from any obvious painting or additions.


The breathtaking spirals add a depth to these structures made of thick-gauged strands that are densely wrapped around and through one another.


More of Richard Stainthorp’s wonderful wire sculptures can be found at,   and

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Shadow Art


Like Houdini and his magic, Einstein and his physics


There is nothing more amazing than saying


How do they do that?


By the assembly of seemingly random objects


and a few squiggles here and there


An art form is born.


Called SHADOW ART, true form is made from true nonsense.


And once you experience it


The shadows will never look the same.



Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Dale Chihuly

You use a glass mirror to see your face; you use works of art to see your soul.  ~ George Bernard Shaw


Dale Chihuly (born September 20, 1941), is an American glass sculptor whose work in glass led to a resurgence of interest in that spectacular medium.


Chiluly graduated in 1965 from the University of Washington where he first was introduced to glass while studying interior design, then an M.S. in sculpture in 1967 from the University of Wisconsin, where he studied glassblowing with Harvey Littleton.


He received an MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design, then worked at a renowned glassblowing workshop in Italy where he observed the team approach to blowing glass, which is critical to the way he works today.


In 1971, Dale Chihuly cofounded Pilchuck Glass School in Washington State.


The technical difficulties of working with glass forms are considerable, yet Chihuly uses it as the primary medium for installations and environmental artwork.


Although Chihuly lost the use of his left eye in a car accident in 1976,  his work with assistants has been nothing short of phenominal.


The artist professed, “Once I stepped back, I liked the view,” and pointed out that it allowed him to see the work from more perspectives and enabled him to anticipate problems faster.


More of Dale Chihuly‘s fantastic glassworks can be found at


Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Katsushika Hokusai

An image seen on a hundred different walls, on placemats, screensavers, postcards.


And yet the incredible history of the artist Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849) is a magical tale of its own.


Hokusai was born on the 23rd day of 9th month of the 10th year of the Hōreki period (October or November 1760) to an artisan family, in the Katsushika district of Edo, Japan.


Hokusai was a Japanese master artist and printmaker of ukkiyo-e, a style of wood block prints and paintings.


Hokusai is best-known as author of the woodblock print series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (c. 1831) which includes the iconic and internationally recognized print, The Great Wave off Kanagawa, created during the 1820s (first image above).


Hokusai was known by a dozen different names through his lifetime, most likely reflecting the different artistic manifestations he went through.

Flock of Chickens

It is this restlessness, this thirst for life and art, that inspired countless other artesians on this continent and others.


And it is this quiet beauty that has withstood the winds of time.