Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Debra Mager

Debra Mager is a self taught mosaic artist.

She developed her craft by learning from the best mosaic teachers in the country, reading many many books on the subject, and by practice.

 Debra’s art is an expression of the joyful, beautiful happy things in life with a touch of whimsy.

She considers her art, in the words of the author, Elizabeth Gilbert,  “souvenirs” of her artistic journey.

Debra read every book on the subject of mosaics, took classes, and practiced incessantly.

She learned quickly, discovered a tremendous passion for the craft, and has been at it ever since.

Debra’s mosaic art is whimsical, technical, and magical — just what you expect mosaic art to be.

More of Debra Mager’s art can be found at http://cinderellamosaics.com,

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Sunday/Monday Evening Art Gallery Blog — David Martin Stone

Illustrator David Stone Martin  (1913-1992) was one of the most prolific and influential graphic designers of the postwar era, creating over 400 album covers.

Much of his work spotlighted jazz, with his signature hand-drawn, calligraphic line perfectly capturing the energy and spontaneity of the idiom.

Born David Livingstone Martin in Chicago, he later studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and began his career as an assistant to the social realist painter Ben Shahn, designing murals during the 1933 World’s Fair.

Martin spent the remainder of the decade as art director of the Tennessee Valley Authority, and served during World War II as an artist/correspondent for Life magazine.

After returning to the U.S. he mounted a career as a freelance artist; in 1948, he also began teaching at the Brooklyn Museum School of Art, followed in 1950 by a year at New York City’s Workshop School of Advertising and Editorial Art.

Martin entered music illustration through his longtime friendship with producer Norman Granz, designing hundreds of now-classic cover paintings for acts including Count Basie, Art Tatum, Gene Krupa, and Lionel Hampton.

Martin’s work has exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, and others.

More of David Stone Martin’s magnificent album covers can be found at http://www.birkajazz.com/archive/stonemartin.htm

#AppreciateYourCreativeFriendsWeek – 1st Day

Roses are Red

Violets are Green

Writing and Painting

Is More Than A Dream!

 

This is a made-up celebration, of course — but is it?

We all are jealous of other’s creativity. In a sweet, supportive way, of course. As shown on my Sunday Evening Art Gallery blog, I am always in awe of what magic comes from creative hands, minds, and souls.

I follow a number of poets, artists, sculptors, and everyday wise men and wise women, and am always in love with their offerings. So I am going to celebrate my friendly creative friends with my own #AppreciateYourCreativeFriends week! Check them out, follow follow follow (if it tickles your fancy), and have a great time doing it!

My Monday recommendation is Carsten Wieland, an amazing watercolor painter who lives in Essen, Germany. His site is full — and I mean full — of fantastic watercolor paintings. Houses, landscapes, weather — every post he shares is yet another glimpse into a very accurate eye and a very open palate.

Check out Carsten Wieland out at Brushpark/Watercolors. https://brushparkwatercolors.wordpress.com/. 

You check in, you may never want to check out!

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Johannes Stoetter

Inspired by nature, recognized body painter Johannes Stoetter turns living models into animals, fruits, flowers, or blends them with the surroundings.

 

These impressively detailed paintings take up to five months of thorough planning and up to eight hours of work to complete.

 

The winner of the World Bodypainting Championship in 2012 says that the key to success is to love what you’re doing.

Stoetter says, “I think I observe the world, nature, colors and shapes with very clear eyes and an open heart. And painting is my big passion.”

Looking at his compositions, you can see just how passionate he is.

You can find more of Johannes Stoetter’s work at johannesstoetterart.com .

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Cecelia Webber

Cecelia Webber uses the human body to construct intricate tessellations that represent the natural world.

Her art implicates the viewer in its form, evoking our complex relationship with our bodies and nature. Her art has been featured around the world.

Each composition can take up to two months to produce, and involves photographing scores of poses; digitally cutting, rotating, and coloring the resulting images; and assembling all of the components together into the finished piece.

Because even slight nuances of colour and form become magnified in their final context, Webber frequently takes more than fifty photographs of a single pose to achieve the desired form.

The artist also regularly uses herself as a subject, setting a camera timer and then orienting herself for the photograph.

Webber’s deep appreciation for nature, along with her scientific background, gives her a deep awareness of organic forms that she draws upon to concoct pieces bearing a unique interplay between colors, shapes, and models’ bodies.

More of Cecelia Webber‘s magnificent art can be found at  http://www.ceceliawebber.com/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Mehndi

Mehndi (also called Mehandi) is the traditional art of painting the hands, feet or body with a paste made from the powdered, dried leaves of the henna plant.

It is an ancient form of body art that has been practiced in the Middle East, India and parts of Africa for thousands of years.

The stains are usually cherry-red to brown color, but this can vary with time left on and a range of other factors.

Mehndi is special for many cultures, not just because it is an important part their culture, but also because of how beautiful the mehandi design looks when women are adorned with it.

In western countries, mehndi has gained a great deal of popularity in the temporary tattoo industry.

This art form is an intricately beautiful way to decorate the human body, a talent that is extraordinary and delicate and precise in its execution.

It is an amazing and intricate art form.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Motohiko Odani

Sometimes an artist’s description by others is as mesmerizing as their art.

Motohiko Odani (1972-) was born and raised in Kyoto, Japan, and received his MFA from Tokyo University of the Arts in 1997.

According to one creative description, “Odani, who possesses a keenly critical understanding of sculpture, has resisted (or taken advantage of) the medium’s conventional image of weightiness or substance.”

“Instead, he has given physical representation to ‘phantoms’ – entirely ephemeral sensations or amorphous phenomena.”

Odani’s works are comprised of complex layers of meaning that defy a singular interpretation, as the artist draws inspiration from various sources including horror and sci-fi films, Japanese folklore, Buddhism, and Futurism.

This last description matches Motohiko’s intrinsic art:  “With Odani’s artworks transcending the conventional idea of sculpture and seeking to give visual representation to existence itself, this exhibition pursues new possibilities for artistic expression.”

I think that’s a perfect description.

More of Motohiko Odani‘s amazing art can be found at http://www.phantom-limb.com/ and http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2011/01/motohiko-odani/.

Sunday/Monday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Alain Delorme

Inspired by the men on bicycles toting impossible mounds of objects he witnessed in Shanghai, French photographer Alain Delorme defies physics with his “Totems” series.

Delorme creates colorful, stylized works that play with our notion of photography as an objective medium.

His series “Totems” surprises with its bright comic book colors and shapes, and ‘can you believe it?’ effect.

The viewer is emerged into a world of exaggerated accumulation, of both everyday objects and towering buildings, an accumulation that has rendered society a slave to the objects it has itself created.

Alain has captured the physical, city translation of the economic growth Shanghai is presently undergoing, in the skyscrapers shooting up in the background, while not forgetting to qualify its success with the walls separating a large part of the population from it.

More of Alain Delorme‘s amazing photography can be found at https://www.alaindelorme.com/.

Thursday Evening Art On The Veranda — Giant Statues

Some may be able to recite the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

One was the Colossus of Rhodes, the other the Statue of Zeus at Olympia.

 

Although those statues are long gone, there are still many who want to take their place.

Around the world there are a giant statues still trying to touch the sun

And to be remembered as he who watches all

As long as man can build statues to honor and to hope

There will be giant statues

And giant dreams

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Lorraine Corrigan

These gorgeous papier-mâché dogs are made by UK-based artist Lorraine Corrigan in Hounds of Bath.

Lorraine adores sight hounds with their sleek lines, grace and elegance.

She loves to introduce the surprising concept of rolled paper art to those who have never seen or heard of quilling.

Lorraine began sculpting dogs with paper around four years ago and has now developed a sophisticated technique using wires and layers of fine papers from recycled books.

Each piece is individually made to order and develops a unique personality as the finishing touches of the expressive eyes and fine ears are added.

At the end process, due to the use of the text, the piece is almost stone-like in texture.

Each piece is then finished with two layers of sealant wash to preserve it for many years to come.

More of Lorraine Corrigan‘s amazing art can be found at All Things Paper and http://houndsofbath.tumblr.com/.

Thursday Evening Art on the Veranda — North Carolina Art

Spring…Summer…Autumn…all are perfect times to walk around the art gallery. Don’t fret — the art is protected from the elements. The weather is perfect, the sun is starting to set — a perfect time to explore a new and unique artist.

Since this is our premiere, let us showcase something…unassuming.

My trip to North Carolina last year.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Nick Veasley

British photographer Nick Veasey uses industrial X-ray machines to discover what makes up the natural world and highlight the surprising, inner beauty in some of the most common objects.

Veasey got the idea to use X-ray machines for art while dating the daughter of a truck driver who was transporting thousands of soda cans, one of which contained a prize worth 100,000 pounds.

He rented an X-ray machine from a local hospital to find the winning can. Although he was unsuccessful, he credits this moment for sparking the idea that launched his career.

Due to the high risk of working with radiation, Veasey custom built a concrete structure to contain it.

To get his pictures, subjects are placed on a lead surface with film behind it. The X-rays pass through the subject and then onto the film where from there he can control the exposure time in a separate room.

Veasey doesn’t actually use any human subjects, as they would have to endure radiation for about 12 minutes. Instead, when a model is needed, he uses skeletons in rubber suits or cadavers that have been donated to science.

Veasey focuses on finding an antidote to the “obsession with appearance” by revealing the beauty within.

Veasey’s work also comments on our society’s increasing paranoia and control by security and surveillance. “To create art with the technology … that helps remove the freedom and individuality in our lives … brings a smile to my face.”

More of Nick Veasley’s fantastic photography can be found at http://www.nickveasey.com/.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — David Krakov

David Kracov studied at the prestigious Rhode Island School of Design and began his career in animation with the Brad Pitt feature, Cool World.

During his time as an illustrator, David began to experiment with different types of clay, and started sculpting the characters from those films he animated.

Kracov’s magical touch with a vibrant color palette turned into unique steel wall sculptures.

Each in a limited edition of only 55 works that begin with hundreds of small sketches that are then hand-cut from a single sheet of steel and then finished with detailed painting in a high-grade, water-based, acrylic polymer paint.

The meticulous steel work along with his scrutinizing attention to detail allow these sculptures to take on a life of their own.

More of David Kracov’s fantastic sculpture work can be found at

http://www.david-kracov.com/

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Hair

Give me a head with hair, long beautiful hair

Shining, gleaming, streaming, flaxen, waxen

Give me down to there, hair, shoulder length or longer

Here baby, there, momma, everywhere, daddy, daddy

Hair, flow it, show it — Long as God can grow, my hair

I want long, straight, curly, fuzzy, snaggy, shaggy, ratty, matty

Oily, greasy, fleecy, shining, gleaming, streaming, flaxen, waxen

Knotted, polka dotted, twisted, beaded, braided

Powered, flowered and confettied

Bangled, tangled, spangled and spahettied

Hair, flow it, show it — Long as God can grow, my hair

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — H.R. Giger

It’s sometimes funny how your first introduction to an artist is through everyday things — like album covers.

H.R. Giger (1940-2014), one of the preeminent artists of Fantastic Realism, was a Swiss surrealist painter, sculptor and set designer known for his biomechanical creatures, extraterrestrial landscapes and disturbing, though memorable, imagery of grotesque sensuality.

Giger discovered the airbrush and, along with it, his own unique freehand painting style, leading to the creation of many of his most well known works.

Giger kept a notepad next to his bed so he could sketch the terrors that rocked his uneasy sleep — nightmarish forms that could as easily have lumbered from prehistory as arrived from Mars.

Giger’s art enters the rarified realm of the near magical, and certainly the land of genius.

But this generous and humble artist avoided the limelight and rather let his work speak volumes of his mastery.

The most famous book with publications of his drawings and landscapes was the “Necronomicon” of 1977.

It was Giger’s published book Necronomicon that inspired Ridley Scott’s Alien.

His work is surrealistic, magical, detailed, and plainly gorgeous.

More of H.R. Giger‘s work can be found at http://www.hrgiger.com/ and http://visualmelt.com/H-R-Giger.

Exploration at the Art Gallery

When you work inside an office all week, one tends to fist pump the air when the weekend comes and the weather is beautiful. So I expect all of you to go outside and fist pump today, then when you come in this evening, put on some great relaxing music and come visit the Sunday Evening Art Gallery.

It’s easy to follow, and the art I’m coming across is so wonderfully beautiful and unique. I’m adding galleries all the time, plus adding more images to the ones I have.  Tell your friends! Say, “Man, have you checkout out that Sunday Evening Art Gallery? Man, that art is so awesome!” (or something to that effect…)

Happy Saturday!

Mihai Criste
Liu Bolon
Ice Sculptures
Minerals
Guido Daniele

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Katerina Kamprani

 Athens-based architect Katerina Kamprani‘s redesigns formerly useful everyday objects in her Uncomfortable series.

 The goal was to re-design useful objects making them uncomfortable but usable and maintain the semiotics of the original item.

Kamprani calls Uncomfortable “a collection of deliberately inconvenient everyday objects,” adding that “it exists in sketches and 3-D visualizations and has no meaningful purpose.”

Kamprani first started the project for no apparent reason other than she wanted to design something, and making things uncomfortable was challenging and amusing to her.

“My project is very carefully designed to annoy — it feeds from the design of each original object and makes a little joke.”

“I am hoping it is not in the list of ‘another badly designed object’ but in the list of extraordinary deliberately badly designed object(s).”

She is an architect and does the work of a rational engineer by day. By night, she is a design enthusiast, interested both in graphic and product design.

More of Katerina Kamprani‘s wonderfully unique art can be found at http://www.kkstudio.gr/#the-uncomfortable.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Michael Parkes

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Born in 1944, Michael Parkes studied graphic art and painting at the University of Kansas, and then traveled for 3 years through Asia and Europe.

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Parkes is both a uniquely talented painter and master of the art of original stone lithography.

He is a painter, sculptor, and stone lithographer.

But more so he has been called the world’s leading Magical Realist.

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It has been said of Parkes, “His work evokes a mysterious atmosphere, which can often only be deciphered with the help of ancient mythology and eastern philosophy.”

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More of Michael Parkes‘ striking work — sculpture, painting and lithographs — can be found at Michael Parkes.

Sunday/Monday Evening Art Gallery — Ercole Barovier

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Ercole Barovier (1889-1972) was the son of Benvenuto Barovier and a member of a centuries-long lineage in the family company, Vetreria Artistica Barovier & C. founded in 1295.

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 He was named the artistic director of the company in 1926, and quickly rose up the ranks of the family business.

After becoming sole proprietor in 1936, he merged his family’s company with the Toso family to become Barovier & Toso in 1939.

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Over the course of his 50-year activity, he invented numerous decorative techniques which contributed significantly to the renovation of art glass.
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From the beginning of the Thirties, he dedicated himself entirely to experimenting with new multi-colored effects, in particular he perfected the colorazione a caldo senza fusione technique (staining heat without fusion) which he first used in 1935-36.

 He was active for fifty years in the company, and amassed a portfolio of no fewer than 25,000 designs.

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Barovier’s work is part of many major museums’ collections around the world. 

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More of Ercole Barovier’s work can be found Ercole Barovier.

Don’t Do It Just Because Everyone Does It

street-arts-animationThe other day a friend asked me why I didn’t put my Sunday Evening Art Gallery on Pinterest. After all, there is a larger audience, and it would get better coverage.

This is probably true. When one writes something, one hopes a lot of people will read it and like it and share it. It’s true. It’s the same when you write a book, or paint a painting. You want people to see what you see, feel what you feel.

But what you wrap your creativity in says a lot about you, too. The colors you choose, the things you sketch, all showcase your views on love, life — everything that makes us human.

We all have dreams of how we want our world to be. Most times we fall short. Not a big deal. We all can’t live in our dreams. But we can create our dreams. We can create atmosphere, characters, life, death, love — anything we want. Any way we want.

When I think of art galleries I think of the Art Institute in Chicago, or Blue Spiral 1 Gallery in Asheville, NC I visited last August. I think of the special care galleries take to showcase their artists. The way they display collections and single pieces. Pottery, sketchings, paintings, steel work — all stand out on their own because of the way they are wrapped in creativity.

That’s why I created the Sunday Evening Art Gallery.

I created a space that feels classic and comfortable and is open 24 hours a day. You can have a cup of coffee in the morning and wander through one of the galleries, or a glass of wine in the evening and catch three or four.

The art is unique. Amazing. Styles most people have never seen.

Why post it side-by-side with dozens of other posters? Why let the beauty, the fun, the uniqueness get lost in everyone else’s shadow?

The same is true for whatever you create. Don’t use the colors everyone else uses; don’t make the same shapes, the same poetry that everyone else does. Not unless you love what everyone else does. Put your own spin on your dreams. Color and paint the world the way you see it — the way you want others to see it. Do it your way!

And let me know where to find you and your dreams. I’m always looking forward to learning, seeing, discovering something — and someone — new!

P.S. Do stop by the Gallery — bring a glass of chocolate milk with you and stay a while!

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Fractals

In the mind’s eye, a fractal is a way of seeing infinity.
~~James Gleick
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A fractal is a never-ending pattern.
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Fractals are infinitely complex patterns that are self-similar across different scales.
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They are created by repeating a simple process over and over in an ongoing feedback loop.
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Geometrically, they exist in between our familiar dimensions.
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Fractal patterns are extremely familiar, since nature is full of fractals.
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Fractal: A set which is larger than the universe.
~Soumya Prakash Sahu

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Tatsuya Tanaka

“Everyone must have had similar thoughts at least once.”

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“Broccoli and parsley might sometimes look like a forest, or the tree leaves floating on the surface of the water might sometimes look like little boat.”

“Everyday occurrences seen from a pygmy’s perspective can bring us lots of fun thoughts.”

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“I wanted to take this way of thinking and express it through photographs.”

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“It would be great if you could use it to add a little enjoyment to your everyday life.”

How could we not be fascinated by such work?

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More of Tatsuya Tanaka‘s amazing work can be found at  http://miniature-calendar.com/.

Copy quoted from Tatsuya Tanaka website.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Jen Stark

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Jen Stark (1983 -) is a contemporary artist whose majority of work involves creating paper sculptures.

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Her artwork mimics intricate patterns and colors found in nature while exploring ideas of replication and infinity.

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Stark takes construction or acid-free colored paper and intricately cuts each sheet with an X-acto knife, layering the paper into a topographical landscape of color and bold shapes.

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Stark’s works have been inspired by many things around the natural world such as infinity, topographical maps, fractals, designs in nature, microscopic patterns, wormholes and sliced anatomy.

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In her own words, “I love thinking about how enormous shapes out in the universe can have the same patterns as tiny microorganisms under a microscope.”

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“How geometric shapes and certain spiraling patterns apply to designs in nature big and small.”

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More of Jen Stark‘s work can be found at http://www.jenstark.com/.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Leonardo Da Vinci

We all have heard of Leonard Da Vinci‘s paintings Mona Lisa and The Last Supper.

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But Da Vinci was so much more than a painter.

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Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (April 15, 1452 – May 2, 1519) was an Italian polymath, having been a scientist, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, painter, sculptor, architect, botanist, musician and writer.

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He spent a great deal of time immersing himself in nature, testing scientific laws, dissecting bodies (human and animal) and thinking and writing about his observations.

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 This was at the same time as King Henry VII — swords and maces, leeching, pestilence, and non-existent technology.

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That is why, when you are an artist, your mantle is wide and long and                   all-encompassing.

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You are a multi-colored rainbow of curiosity and creativity.

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Just like Leonardo.

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More of Leonardo Da Vinci’s works can be found at http://www.leonardoda-vinci.org/.

Keep Warm With a Visit to the Sunday Evening Art Gallery

Snowed in this weekend?

Need a break from writing your novel?

Bored with TV? Radio?

Come take a break at the Sunday Evening Art Gallery!

A number of galleries have recently been updated, bringing you more of the extraordinary art that makes the Gallery a popular stop-by gallery.

Here are a few examples of unusual and fascinating art:

Luke Jerram  

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Jackson Pollock

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Bubbles

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Mihai Criste

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Aquariums

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It’s the kind of world you can visit again and again. There are images there for inspiration, for daydreams, and for sharing with friends.

Stay warm — fill a goblet with wine or chocolate milk, put some easy-listening music on in the background, and stroll through the magic of the Sunday Evening Art Gallery.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Kathryn Vercillo

Quite simply, crochet feeds the human need for balance in our lives. Making something with our hands reflects something basic about ourselves. We want to work hard without losing touch with our creative selves; we want to earn money without losing our souls; and we want to be part of a larger picture of human progression while still maintaining our individuality. – Crochet Designer Vickie Howell

 

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The Art of Crocheting is so much more than a hook and yarn.

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It is a talent honed on cold nights and empty days

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And during the rare times children are napping.

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It is the miraculous obsession of creating fabric by interlocking loops of yarn, thread, or strands of other materials using a crochet hook.

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It is a glorious celebration of material and creativity and vision.

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It is patience, perseverance, and practice.

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And besides all of that — it’s beautiful Art.

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These lovely images were found at http://www.crochetconcupiscence.com/2012/03/100-unique-crochet-scarves/, one of the sites created by artist Kathryn Vercillo http://kathrynvercillo.com/

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Pierre Brissaud

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Pierre Brissaud  (1885- 1964) was a French illustrator, painter, and a prominent figure of French Art Deco.

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He created illustrations for publications Les Feuillets d’Art, La Gazette du Bon Ton, Fortune, House & Garden, Vanity Fair, and Vogue.

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Many of his illustrations are realistic leisure scenes of the well-to-do.

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From the mid-1920 to the early 1930’s, Pierre Brissaud was known for his stencil prints meant for magazine covers and advertising.

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Not only did Brissaud created prints and posters for fashion houses, but he also did book illustrations including Manon Lescaut, Two Gentlemen of Verona, and Madame Bovary.

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It is through his creative artistry that the reflections of elegance of days gone by are preserved.

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More about Pierre Brissaud can be found at http://bestarts.org/artist/pierre-brissaud/

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Pysanky Eggs

A pysanka, or Pysanky Egg, is a Ukrainian Easter Egg decorated with traditional Ukrainian folk designs.

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The word pysanka comes from the verb pysaty, “to write”, as the designs are not painted on, but written with beeswax.

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Ukrainians have been decorating eggs, creating these miniature jewels, for countless generations.

There is a ritualistic element involved, magical thinking, a calling out to the gods and goddesses for health, fertility, love, and wealth.

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The pysanky was believed to possess an enormous power not only in the egg itself, which harbored the nucleus of life, but also in the symbolic designs and colors which were drawn upon the egg in a specific manner.

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The symbolic ornamentation of the pysanky consists of geometric motifs, with some animal and plant elements.

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The intricately colored eggs were used for various social and religious occasions and were considered to be a talisman, a protector against evil, as well as harbingers of good.

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This magical craft has brought the world another dimension of beauty, creativity, and fine art.

Pysanky Ukrainian Easter Eggs

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Ray Villafane

Artists who truly create from the heart leave lasting impressions on our minds and hearts

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Sometimes, those memories are mixed with a bit of awe, a bit of amazement

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and a bit of fear

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Ray Villafane graduated from the School of Visual Arts in New York City in 1991.

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Having a passion for children, he elected for a career in teaching.

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After several custom-carved requests from students’ parents, Ray realized he was on to something with his pumpkins and started offering them to local hotels and restaurants.

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Ray’s hobby of pumpkin carving exploded after winning the Grand Prize for Food Network’s Outrageous Pumpkin Challenge I and II.

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The rest, as the cliché points out, is history.

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More of Ray Villafane‘s extraordinary talents can be found at his website

http://villafanestudios.com/.

You Rock!

einstein-1When I started this blog back on April 18, 2011, I must have had 20 blogs already written ahead of time. That’s how excited I was. Before I started my Sunday Evening Art Gallery blog, I probably had 10 or 11 artists on hold. That, too, shows how excited I was to get started.

Now days I am more of a on-the-spot blog writer, sharing the Goddess’s humor as she calls. Which is all the time. And my Art Blog’s collection is doubling all the time as I find more and more unique artists to showcase.

This is what creativity is all about.

Doing what you love. When you want to. Because you want to.

I don’t have an anniversary to celebrate, or moment in time to highlight today.  All I wanted to do was thank you all for supporting me, reading me, looking at my art. Telling your friends. Or just checking me out yourself.

I can’t believe there are so many branches to Creativity. I’ve talked to quilters, sculptors, painters, publicists, graphic artists, gardeners, writers, poets, photographers, calligraphers — all sorts of artists with all sorts of stories. Everyone has a different story, background, reason for exploring their creative side.

Think of the things you can create! Dragons, spaceships, murderers, gardens, parentless heroes, ghosts, musical prodigies, statues, symbols. You can change history, travel through history, interpret history. As an artist there is nothing you can’t do.

This is why I encourage all of you to “do your thing.” Know your base is strong and expand from there. There is no right or wrong when it comes to the arts. And the more you do it, the better you get at it.

I just wanted to take time to than you all. For your friendship, for your curiosity. And for your encouragement. I hope we hang together for a dozen more years. I hope you continue to enjoy my art and my pretzel-logic mind. You inspire me, and I hope I do the same for you.

Huzzah!

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Gustav Klimt

Gustav Klimt (1862-1918) was the leading figure of the so-called Vienna Secession, an art movement that rebelled against the established art concepts and introduced a new style similar to Art Nouveau.

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To bring more abstract and purer forms to the designs of buildings and furniture, glass and metalwork, the group  gave birth to another form of modernism in the visual arts and they named their own new movement: Secession.

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Klimt was seen as an artist who was far ahead of his time.

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Much of the work that was produced during the Austrian born artist’s career, however, was seen as controversial.

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Although symbolism was used in many of his art forms, it was not at all subtle, and it went far beyond what the imagination during the time frame accepted.

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Klimt’s primary subject was the female body, and his works bordered on eroticism.

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Although his work was not widely accepted during his time, some of the pieces that Gustav Klimt did create during his career are today seen as some of the most important and influential pieces to come out of Austria.

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More of Gustav Klimt’s work can be found at http://www.klimtgallery.org and http://www.gustav-klimt.com.

Sunday Morning Art Gallery Blog — The Aftermath of 9/11 in Art

To send light into the darkness of men’s hearts — such is the duty of the artist. ~ Robert Schumann

 

lady-liberty-statueLady Liberty Memorial – 9/11 Memorial Museum

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tony-triggTony Trigg

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9/11 Memorial, Freehold, NJ

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the-madonna-in-hell-by-fevorr-j-nwokorieThe Madonna in Hell, Fevorr J. Nwokorie

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hearh-satowHeath Satow

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Brooklyn Wall of Rememberance

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Kenny Wang

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9_11-flight-93-memorialFlight 93 Memorial, Shanksville, PA

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hero-image-pentagon-memorial-photo-credit-mike-myersPentagon Memorial, Washington D.C.

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the-hero-khai-nguyenThe Hero, Khai Nguyen

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Port Authority Memorial Quilt

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Trinity Root,  Steve Tobin

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tumbling-woman-eric-fischlTumbling Woman, Eric Fischl

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Fire Department New York Memorial Quilt

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lower-school-art-students-of-porter-gaud-schoolscLower School Art Students of Porter Gaud School, South Carolina

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David Kracov

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flight-crew-memorialFlight Crew Memorial, Grapevine, Texas

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911-dust-to-dnamikey-flowers-kevinclarkeDust to DNA, Bianca Nazzaruolo

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spencer-finchSpencer Finch, 9/11 Memorial Museum

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to-lift-a-nation-ground-zeroTo Lift A Nation, Ground Zero

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teardrop-memorialbayonne-njTeardrop Memorial, Bayonne, NJ

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9/11 Victims Memorial Quilt

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9/11 Memorial Museum

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Full Circle

A few weeks ago I fell in love with the atmosphere, art, and the Biltmore I found in North Carolina.

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My visit gave me a greater appreciation of the world of individuality, art, and wealth.

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Last weekend I wandered through the competition barn of a small county fair.

When I came upon the Art Show, I knew I had come full circle.

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I realized that this is where it all starts.

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This is where Jackson Pollock and John Singer Sargent began.

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Where Dali dabbled and Wiggans wandered.

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This is where Richard Morris Hunt found architecture and Katsushika Hokusai played with ink drawings.

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Where either because of a parent’s encouragement or despite lack of it, a creativity seed found fertility and grew.

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This is the uncharted land of creativity, of space and design and imagination.

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This…is Art.

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Pictures courtesy of Vilas County Fair, 2016

and CJA, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

Atmosphere, Art, and the Biltmore — Part 2

Art

Who doesn’t enjoy looking at the world through others eyes?

Who doesn’t have a painting of flowers or a scenery print or a portrait hanging on their wall?

Who hasn’t collected a glass vase or pottery mug or bronze sun to hang on their porch?

Art is created in a broad stroke with largest paint brush imagineable. It’s the appreciation of another’s work enough to research it, talk about it, collect it, share it. It depends on one’s perspective of life. One sees a sea of flowers; another a gateway of pain. One sees squiggles; another, divinity.

It’s all relative — it’s all Art.

Don’t compare what you see in an artist’s dream with what others see. If you’d like, read the artist’s explanation, then feel it, interpret it as you will. As with many other virtues, Art is an ideal all men strive for but often misunderstand. It is an expression of you but a reflection of others.

Some incredible interpretations found on my journey through North Carolina:

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Next:  the Biltmore

Atmosphere, Art, and the Biltmore — Part 1

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 Atmosphere

 

A whirlwind weekend brings out all sorts of thoughts and emotions. Especially when you spend the special moments with people you really enjoy. Kids, mates, friends, cousins — all can bring a sense of magic and wonder to your life every time you turn around.

Spending a weekend in Ashville, North Carolina, was one of those times. It was a little bit of freedom, a little bit of music, a little bit of adventure. Though we live hundreds of miles apart, my friend and I met to renew friendship, share burst balloons, and explore ways to move forward in the world and ways of Creativity.

Every region has its own traditions, its own style, its own way of doing things. Midwest Wisconsin is a lot different from Western North Carolina. Ashville is a decent size city nestled in the Appalachian Mountains. Heat, humidity, and lush greenery run rampant through the streets and countryside. The people are gracious, drive like maniacs, and wonderfully creative.

The streets were filled with art galleries, outdoor eateries, and pubs full of music. Friday night the air was warm and humid and the streets full of artists strutting their goods. A bare-chested bearded dude with a pink rabbit hat walked his dog passed a girl painting henna hands and a poet who wrote you a personal poem for a small donation. Musicians of all colors and sizes hung out on street corners and in front of bistros, playing guitars, flutes, and violins. Trios one corner, a girl singing with a guitar across the street, all sharing their talent and the night.

Breweries offered their specialized creations while fruit bars mingled with marvelously unique chocolate shops. Tiny Christmas lights hung over outdoor eating spaces, Italian specialities competing with tapas and Oriental sesame noodles. Young and old strolled up and down the main street, skinny girls with striped faerie leggings walking with women in sun dresses and guys in properly preppy shirts. It was a cornicopia of life and laughs and conversation and music. Something my little Wisconsin town doesn’t offer.

Art galleries flourished on main streets and side streets. Most were closed by the time I wandered past their windows, but the ones who were open boasted Dichroic glass sculptures and abstract printmaking. Some mediums I had never seen before. Offbeat novelty shops brought back memories of the 60s, selling incense and scented soaps, colorfully graphic socks, sassy self-awareness books, unicorn candle holders, and violet gum.

The Village Art & Craft Fair was a marvelous beehive of amazing art and artists. Just like art fairs across the country, the hard work and inspiration of craftsmen left me breathless. I didn’t always understand the method or their behind-the-scenes inspiration, but I did understand the end result of jewelry, mosaic tile shoes, pottery, tables, hand-blown glass balls filled with feathers, and dark ceramic clay sculptures. A lot of artists were local; others returned year after year to showcase their latest wares.

Finalizing my journey at the immortal Biltmore Estate, my whole world of art and architecture and photography and history exploded into one cosmic experience. I was actually able to be in the “now” each and every day. And the “now” was cool, fun, and satisfying.

Creativity is universal. It is the expression of our heart’s deepest secrets, our imagination’s fondest dreams. I really believe that once you open that door new worlds present themselves all the time. Like a symphony, moods and memories are created by each special note you experience.

Find a way to experience it.

 

NEXT:  Art

 

 

 

Tuesday-Not-Sunday-Evening Art-Gallery-Humor-Blog

They-Wait-in-Silence-4f6276864bf58_hiresI’m sure you’ve seen these posts on Facebook that show a wonderfully huge mansion in the woods/on the water/at the edge of the mountains, and the post says, “If you could live without WiFi and a phone and TV, etc., would you live here?”

Having spent the last five days up Nort’ , I think I can answer a solid “No.”

It wasn’t a mansion; it was a little house we call “The Cabin.” No TV, no Dish/Direct TV, no WiFi, just a DVD/8 Track Player and a radio. For getaway purposes it was ideal. But the times I tried to go online to do some Art Gallering, the signal from my phone was  烂摊子. A mess. So my wildly popular (I love adding my own adjectives) Sunday Evening Art Gallery had to take a Sunday night break.

I also wanted to spend some free time looking for unique artists, following a few leads from friends and followers (I’m always open for suggestions!). Grandkids were out playing, men fishing, cool breeze in the window, quiet except for the sounds of nature, it was a perfect Art Moment.

Yet I could not load any page other than the main one I landed on. No pictures, no links. And I felt like those people who can’t go to the bathroom without their cell phone. I felt helpless. And more than that — pathetic.

During this contemplation time I had a few revelations, too. I think we all get messages from the beyond…all get an idea which direction we should go. But we don’t listen. We — our ego — knows better. So we butt our heads against the wall and keep trying to recast the same pot.

What works for you? What feels right? What feels out-of-sorts? Are you happy with your blog? Are you happy with your craft? Would you sometimes rather do B than A? K rather than E?

I have found a new love affair with Unique Art. There are so many wonderful, unique, unusual artists sharing their work with the world that I’ve never heard of, never seen, never imagined until these past few years. And the thrill I get out of sharing them with you is the same thrill I get when I’ve written something good.

I can feel that same energy when I talk with people who are hooked into some sort of creativity. Their eyes glow, their breath shortens, and their dreams spill out through their words.

I want you to have that glow, too. I want you to sparkle like the fireworks on the 4th of July every time you think of your craft. You will crash and burn and agonize and think and dance and fly. But you will grow and learn and sparkle, too.

I suppose I will wait to introduce a new artist to the Sunday Evening Art Gallery. No need to rush amazement, is there? But because I can’t go long without sharing some kind of art, I will publish a new Gallery.

Don’t go too long without doing your creative thing, too!

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Sue Benner

While pursuing a degree in molecular biology and masters in biomedical illustration, Sue Benner created her vision of the microscopic universe in painted and quilted textile constructions.

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She creates her richly layered quilt canvases by collaging her dye-painted and printed silks with recycled textiles to form wonderful works of art.

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Sue is a recognized innovator in her field, having developed new techniques in fused quilt construction to further the expression of her ideas.

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According to Benner, “My love affair with fabric began with my first memories of the clothes my mother made me, recalling exact hue, fiber content, and weave. In the ensuing years, my mother taught me to sew, carefully and creatively. “

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“I see a direct connection between the concept of quilt and the assembly of units to make a larger whole.”

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“I revel in the simple act of placing one fabric next to another.”

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More of Sue Benner’s fantastic creations can be found on her website  http://www.suebenner.com/

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Judit Czinkné Poór

When is a cookie not a cookie?

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When it is an amazing creation by Judit Czinkné Poór.

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Chef Judit Czinkné Poór is the mastermind behind Hungarian cake decorating shop Mézesmanna, a small studio with a giant social media presence because of the incredible photos and videos they share of their decorative confections.

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Each cookie is hand painted, the patterns often traditional patterns from folk costumes and embroideries from her native Hungary.

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Judit’s deft touch makes edible creations that are almost too beautiful to eat.

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Her embroidery style touches on portraiture, animals, intricate lacework, winter holidays, and floral patterns.

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In addition to the folk art-inspired cookies, Poór also decorates cookies with portraits and 3D images.

A true artist, Judit Czinkné Poór and her magic can be found on her Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/Mezesmanna/, and one of many feature interviews,  http://aplus.com/a/judit-czinkne-poor-decorated-cookies.

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to My Anniversary

thThe child must know that he is a miracle, that since the beginning of the world there hasn’t been, and until the end of the world there will not be, another child like him.  ~Pablo Casals

Five years. I swear to the goddesss almighty, I can’t believe I’ve been writing this blog for five years. Five years today. So much has happened in this short period of time — and so much yet to happen.

I almost forgot the significance of tonight — it’s like last Friday I realized that Monday was going to be my writing anniversary, then I got fried watching my grandkids all weekend (I love the tan from that!), then my Sunday Evening blog. So I almost forgot — no, I did forget — until I was laying in bed, in the dark, trying to fall asleep.

My mind was running and running, but not about what you think. It wasn’t full of anniversary sparklers and referrals to past blogs — it was centered on a Facebook experience I had earlier in the evening.

You know how ads and reposts from other people drift in and off of your account. Most I glance at then pass by. But someone posted this picture.  

And I thought, wow..kinda cool. Maybe this is something for my Sunday Evening Art Gallery blog. So I followed the breadcrumbs and found out that this artwork — and a number of others — is done by a 14-year-old girl named Candace Walters, who just happens to be severely autistic.

I say “happens to be”, because once I did more research,  her parent’s pride shown through every word they shared. Her parents wrote,  “Candy is showing the World what children with autism are capable of achieving!! They have great potential for excellence!!”

How can you forget something like this?

How can you not love the beauty, the colors, the love this child brings into this world?

I have written to the e-mail address, asking if I could highlight Candy’s work on my Sunday Evening Art Gallery blog. Sometimes I just highlight artists, as they are out of reach, but this felt so much more personal. I want to shout out her light, her beauty, on my blog, but I also want her or her parents or her guardians or her family to know I’m shouting it out.

In this case it’s called respect.

So tonight, my 5-year anniversary of having shared my thoughts, my heart, and my love of writing and art to all of you, I find myself turning the spotlight to someone who deserves recognition so much more than I do.

You can find Candy’s artwork at https://www.facebook.com/candywatersautismartist, and her work can be purchased at http://www.zazzle.com/candace69/products.

Hopefully I will be able to share more of her magic with you in the future. Yet, with the sun having set on my 5th anniversary, I’m already filled with magic.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Loïs Mailou Jones

Loïs Mailou Jones (1905 – 1998) decided early in her career that she would become a recognized artist—no easy path for an African American girl born at the beginning of the twentieth century.

 

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After two years in North Carolina where she experienced the frustrations and indignities of segregation first-hand, Jones left Palmer Memorial and joined the faculty of the Fine Arts Department at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

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Jones’s long career may be divided into four phases: the African-inspired works of the early 1930s, French landscapes, cityscapes, and figure studies from 1937 to 1951, Haitian scenes of the 1950s and 1960s, and the works of the past several decades that reflect a return to African themes.

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Loïs was the first and only African American to break the segregation barrier denying African Americans the right to display visual art at public and private galleries and museums in the United States.

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Throughout her 60 year career as an artist and educator, Loïs Mailou Jones broke down barriers with quiet determination during a time when inequality, racial discrimination, and segregation hindered her from gaining the acknowledgement and prestige she deserved as a talented artist.

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Skillfully integrating aspects of African masks, figures, and textiles into her vibrant paintings, Jones continued to produce exciting new works at an astonishing rate of speed, even in her late eighties.

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Loïs Mailou Jones was not only an artist, but a movement, inspiring the Harlem Renaissance and the future of all artists struggling to be heard.

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Lois’s lucious art can be found at http://loismailoujones.com/  and at http://nmwa.org/explore/artist-profiles/lo%C3%AFs-mailou-jones.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Sunday Evening Art Gallery

www.sundayeveningartgallery.com

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This quiet evening I thought I would introduce you to world you may not know exists

A world filled with even more views of creative inspiration

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If you have enjoyed sitting back on Sunday Evenings

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enjoying the discoveries of creative artists of all genres

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Then you will love the full version of my Sunday Evening Art Gallery

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Click on any of these images and see more magic

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Explore more creations by these amazing artists, these amazing minds

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Art that is limited only by the artist’s imagination and talent

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I have collected dozens of extra images that could not fit on my Goddess blog

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Images that deserved their own gallery

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I add new galleries every week — I collect so many images on each journey my arms and blog cannot hold them all

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So please come and visit a world of unique images and unique artists

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Come see what creativity is really all about

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And if you like what you see, come back often.

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And please — tell your friends what a world you have discovered!

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www.sundayeveningartgallery.com

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Don Esser

 

I have often found that letting the artist explain his craft is the most rewarding explanation of all.

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So it is with Don Esser: Blacksmith, Metal Artist, and Sculptor.

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Since 1976, using hammer and anvil, I’ve been pounding, twisting, and shaping hot metal.

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As a self-taught artist, my approach to life and art has always had an element of fearlessness to it. From childhood on, art has always been a natural, joyful part of my life.

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There is a fluid lightness to my work partly because I’m enjoying making it and partly because, after so many years, I have learned the language of my materials.

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I try to capture the essence in as few lines as possible, with a sense of fluidity and grace that can be achieved working in the forge.

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It is a little like stealing fire from the gods and my goal is to put a bit of that sense of wonder into each piece I make.

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That playful quality in my work also means that most of my pieces are one of a kind. 

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People often ask, “How long does it take you to make it?”

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My answer is, “36 years of practice, 50-plus years of training, and a lifelong desire to make art.”

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More of Don Esser’s remarkable work can be found at Steel Wool Studio (http://steelwoolstudio.com/don-esser.htm).

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Kirigami


Most have heard of Oragami, but have you heard of Kirigami?

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The major difference between the two is that, in origami, you fold paper, whereas in kirigami, you fold and cut paper.

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Typically, kirigami starts with a folded base, which is then cut;

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cuts are then opened and flattened to make the finished kirigami.

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A difference between kirigami and the art of “pop-up” is that kirigami is made out of a single piece of paper that has been cut into a design.

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Kirigami are usually symmetrical, such as pentagrams and snowflakes.

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It is an art that takes a true plan, a steady hand, and a piece of paper.

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Not to mention … imagination.

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Kirigami artists and clubs can be found throughout the Internet.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Fabergé

 

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The age of elegance, of decadence

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The series of exquisite eggs shaped by Faberge for the Imperial Russian family between 1885 and 1916, is considered as the artist-goldsmith’s ultimate and most long-term achievement.

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Gold, diamonds, rubies, enamel, all decorate the over-the-top gifts to the Russian Tsars Alexander III and Nicholas II as Easter gifts for their wives and mothers.

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 These are often referred to as the ‘Imperial’ Fabergé eggs.

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The House of Fabergé made about 50 eggs, of which 43 have survived.

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Two more were planned for Easter 1918, but were not delivered, due to the Russian Revolution.

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It was a time of rarity; of riches beyond compare, and poverty unimagined.

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And from those Easter gifts created long ago, a name, a heritage, was born.

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 Fabergé.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Craig L. Haupt

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In a Wonderland they lie, Dreaming as the days go by, Dreaming as the summers die:

Ever drifting down the stream — Lingering in the golden gleam — Life, what is it but a dream?

~~Lewis Carroll

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Craig L Haupt is a Maryland based artist who works with Pen & Ink, watercolor, color pencil, and acrylics to create whimsical abstract images.

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The words of artist Craig L. Haupt are as honest as his works.

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“Though having earned an Art Education degree in 1999 (at 50 years old) and taking the required art courses, I am for the most part self-taught.”

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“During my professional career, the early and latter part has been mechanical drawing/drafting. From childhood to present, I have been surrounded by my doodles and countless stick figures that have never left me.”

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“Over time, they all have been unintentionally blending to create a menagerie of different subjects.”

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 Craig’s artwork can be found in several spots around the galaxy — his blog is  www.craiglhaupt.com, his website is www.clhaupt.com, and his FaceBook Art Page is Craig L Haupt.

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Take some time and explore his works. You will enjoy them as I do.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Nathalie Miesbach

To my young friends out there:

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Life can be great, but not when you can’t see it.

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So, open your eyes to life:

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to see it in the vivid colors that God gave us

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as a precious gift to His children,

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to enjoy life to the fullest,

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and to make it count.

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Say yes to your life.

Nancy Reagan

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Nathalie Miebach is an artist whose work focuses on the intersection of art and science and the visual articulation of scientific observations. Her woven sculptures interpret scientific data related to astronomy, ecology and meteorology in three-dimensional space.

You can find more of her intricate work at her website, http://nathaliemiebach.com.

Enjoy your wandering.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Guido Daniele

Come in close

Because the more you think you see

The easier it will be to fool you.

J. Daniel Atlas, Now You See Me, 2013

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Guido Daniele is an Italian multimedia artist and body painter. He has worked in many different media and has also worked for two years in India, where he attended the Tankas School in Dharamsala.

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He produced a sequence of animals painted on the human hand, which he calls ‘handimals’.

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The work is so intimate, so impeccable, it’s hard to believe it’s painting at all.

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Guido Daniele was born in Soverato (CZ – Italy) in 1950 and now lives and works in Milan.

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The beauty of Art is Illusion. What you see vs. what the artist sees.

And because you are on different sides of the canvas, you see different angles of the Illusion.

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So look closely. But not too closely.

For the magic is in the Illusion of the Art.

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You can find more of Guido’s exquisite art at http://www.guidodaniele.com/

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Sunday Evening Art Gallery — George Rodrigue

I am continuously amazed at the Unique Art I come across these days — the art I can’t wait to share with you.

But this evening I am sharing an artist that somehow stirs even more inside of me. More so because I’ve always loved this artist … and never knew his name.

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Meet — Blue Dog. Possibly one of the most iconic pop art figures created by artist George Rodrigue. Blue Dog has been everywhere from the permanent collection of the Smithsonian to the White House and all over the world.

Banana Split Sundae

Born and raised in New Iberia, Louisiana,  George began painting the third grade while bedridden with polio. Later in life, his art studies at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette followed by the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena gave him a foundation that spawned one of the greatest success stories in southern art.

Life Is a Light Bulb

George Rodrigue was a gifted artist who set out to paint Louisiana as he knew it by visually interpreting the landscape and the rich history of the Cajun people. But that all changed when he found his model in his studio: a photograph of his dog, Tiffany, who had died.

Blue Dog Oak

She was black and white in reality but became blue in his imagination, with yellow eyes. She was also a she, but she could become a he — or, for that matter, whatever else a viewer was prepared to see.

 Are You Lonesome Tonight

“I’m expressing the feelings of mankind today through the Blue Dog,” George said.  “The dog is always having problems of the heart, of growing up, the problems of life. The dog looks at us and asks, ‘Why am I here? What am I doing? Where am I going?’ Those are the same questions we ask ourselves. People look at the paintings, and the paintings speak back to them.”

Mardi Gras 2015

Sadly, George Rodrigue passed away at age 69 on December 14, 2013, after a long battle with cancer. Sixty-nine. A mere youth in the cosmic scope of things. George used his art to help raise awareness of causes, and improve the profile of his beloved New Orleans and Louisiana.

Everywhere

His heart was in his work, in his love of his blue dog and his beautiful wife and loving kids. I am sorry I never knew his name before now. But I will never forget him.

He Stopped Loving Her Today

George’s fantastic collection can be seen at https://georgerodrigue.com/. His wife Wendy continues his legacy with a loving blog which you should check out too: http://www.wendyrodrigue.com/. A deeper tribute can also be found at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/brian-ross/remembering-rodrigue-the-_b_4503698.html/.

Love Me Forever

We’ve all had our Blue Dogs — here’s hoping you find one, too.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Doors

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Open the door and you shall see

The most wondrous things from land to sea.

Your dreams await on the other side

Imagination beckons far and wide

What do you think awaits you there?

Come! Let us venture without a care

A chance to explore worlds never seen

Magic and reality and all inbetween

Open the door and you shall see

The most wondrous things from land to sea.

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Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Unmask Group

Photographs and paintings often give us a full representation of the subject.

 

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If we are all more than the sum of our parts, what are we if parts of us are missing?

 

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Can we be ever-so-much-more by showing ever-so-much-less?

 

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Or, more likely, what if we are more than just one thing?

 

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The Beijing-based group known as Unmask Group has managed to not only honor the human form through sculpture, but added a new twist to its visual appeal by subtracting redundant parts from the sculptures.

 

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I am amazed that so much can be said with so little.

 

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Liu Zhan, Kuang Jun and Tan Tianwei met while at the Central Academy of Fine Arts and have been producing sculptural work together since 2001.

 

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More wonderful art from the Masked Group can be found at

http://designcollector.net/sculptures-by-unmask/ and http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2012/01/dissolving-figurative-sculptures-by-unmask/.

See if you can decide which parts of you are shown, which parts have been cut away, and which parts have been melded with someone or something else.