Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Naoto Hattori

Japanese artist Naoto Hattori imagines small fluffy animals with healthy doses of fantasy and some unnatural hybridization.The painted creatures often feature round heads and disproportionately large and reflective eyes.

At once adorable and unnervingly surreal, the fantastical creatures  seamlessly meld the myriad textures and colors found in nature into unusual hybrids.They’re often fluffy, equipped with horns in surprising spots, and bear eyes so inordinately large and glassy that they reflect full-scale landscapes.These acrylic paintings are small, typically measuring less than 3 inches by 3 inches when unframed.The artist’s style has been labeled as pop surrealist, but Hattori says it’s just what he sees in his mind.Of his work, he says: “My vision is like a dream, whether it’s a sweet dream, a nightmare, or just a trippy dream. I try to see what’s really going on in my mind, and that’s a practice to increase my awareness in stream-of-consciousness creativity. “The creatures in the paintings are avatars for entering the world of my imagination. The eyes feel like an entrance to the world of visionary memories.“I often paint a piece which visualizes myself as a hybrid creature entering the visionary world,” Hattori explains.More of Naoto Hattori’s wonderful surrealistic artworks can be found at https://www.naotohattori.com/.

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Diana Rosa

Diana Rosa is an established Cuban painter based in Canada, whose works have featured in prizes, publications and exhibitions across North America, the UK and Asia.Influenced by her festive Cuban childhood spent surrounded by an abundance of creative energies, Rosa creates works that reflect her distinctive use of rich exoticism of tropical vegetation.She employs a Naïve Folk-Art style, along with  elements of Cubist and Surrealist schools, to explore questions of identity, love, relationship and environment in our society.

The artist aims to show our relationship to the world around us through the versatile medium of acrylic paint.

She uses sharp brush strokes, contrasting textures, and a variety of acrylic mediums, commenting on our human emotions, mixed realism with fantasy.

Bright and whimsical images with a touch of modernism, Rosa’s  art brings to life thoughts and impressions dancing with imagery.

“I am always fascinated with the human story that all of us are living — often untold, sometimes unrecognized, but always significant,” Rosa shares.“My paintings reflect the natural beauty of human emotions.“They are a bridge from my imagination to theirs, and although the story I mean to tell may differ from what the viewer ultimately takes away, what is most important is that we have shared the tale.”

More of Diana Rosa’s delightful art can be found at https://www.artfinder.com/artist/diana-rosa and https://www.singulart.com/en/artist/diana-rosa-3851

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Arnau Alemany

Arnau Alemany was born in Barcelona in 1948, at the foot of a hill in one of those neighborhoods that have grown in an anarchic way, without order or planning.Up the mountain in a range that imprisons the city, buildings were built in unusual places with difficult access, creating an unusual urban complex, close to nonsense.Alemany is Spain’s foremost painter of surrealistic environments and industrialized cities of the past/future, and is recognized worldwide as one of today’s leading surrealists. He conceives his work as an effort to challenge the viewer, not to leave him indifferent, be it for better or for worse.The artist creates imaginary urban landscapes, either with signs of destruction or general abandonment, which he hopes will show that visual surprise is possible through the use of magical realism.With the security of long years of drawing, graphic, pictorial and sculptural training, Alemany works to elaborate plausible and unreal landscapes.In his world, non-existent cityscapes with a perfect geometry and coherence in their individual elements, impossible to achieve in the real work, form what he calls an “imperfect landscape”.Surreal or not, his art makes us wish we could visit his world in person.

More of Arnau Alemany‘s amazing landscapes can be found at http://www.arnaualemany.com/. 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Igor Morski

Igor Morski  is a famous Polish illustrator and graphic designer whose surreal art is as thought evoking as they are beautifully created.Morski graduated with honors from the Interior Architecture and Industrial Design Faculty at the State Higher School of Fine Art in Poznań (now the University of Arts).His surreal  illustrations often portray the relationship between humans and nature.Morski’s surrealism appeared a little bit by accident. For 20 years he has been a press illustrator with the Polish weekly magazine “Wprost”.The beginning of cooperation with “Wprost” coincided with the decision by the publisher of this magazine to illustrate with only one type of illustration, based on photo manipulation.This, he admits, made a great impression, because people were not familiar with Photoshop, and many illustrations were taken literally, as if what was shown in the illustration was really true.The fact that since then he has worked on photographic material has caused realism to appear in his work.Morski feels that  Poles have quite specific sense of sensitivity.“Wars and many other horrors that have flooded our country have made it acceptable for us a kind of narrative, difficult to accept elsewhere.  For people who viewed them, they were scary.”“As an allegory, I placed a labyrinth of stairs in the human head. In Poland, people focused on the hidden meaning, and the Dutch drew attention to the fact of head “mutilation”. They were interpreting this very literally.”More of Igor Morski‘s wonderful surrealism can be found at https://igormorski.pl/

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Pablo Picasso

Pablo Ruiz Picasso (1881 – 1973) was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, and theatre designer who spent most of his adult life in France.

The Old Guitarist

 

Regarded as one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture, the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore.

Guernica

 

Picasso demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a naturalistic manner through his childhood and adolescence.

Family of Saltimbanques

 

During the first decade of the 20th century, his style changed as he experimented with different theories, techniques, and ideas.

Girl before a Mirror

 

After 1906, the Fauvist work of the slightly older artist Henri Matisse motivated Picasso to explore more radical styles, beginning a fruitful rivalry between the two artists, who subsequently were often paired by critics as the leaders of modern art.

Three Musicians

 

Much of Picasso’s work of the late 1910s and early 1920s is in a neoclassical style, and his work in the mid-1920s often has characteristics of Surrealism.

Gertrude Stein

 

His later work often combines elements of his earlier styles.

The Weeping Woman

 

Exceptionally prolific throughout the course of his long life, Picasso achieved universal renown and immense fortune for his revolutionary artistic accomplishments, and became one of the best-known figures in 20th-century art.

Picasso Statue, Chicago

 

More of Pablo Picasso’s wonderful art can be found at https://www.pablopicasso.org/ and http://www.picasso.com/.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Chad Knight

 

Chad Knight is a 41-year-old visual artist from Portland, Oregon.Chad was a professional skateboarder  for 16 years. During that time, it served as his creative outlet.Now he creates mind-bending 3D drawings and incredible sculptures that highlight issues such as global warming and loss of habitat for animals.Chad Knight’s amazing and incredible sculptures seem so realistic that people sometimes  want to choose them as their travel destination.According to Knight, “Everything on my work represents something or someone. My art is very much like an encrypted journal that I can share publicly.”Knight laughs that he has a very overactive, noisy mind.“Now that I do not have the opportunity to do it (skateboarding) as often, combined with being less enthusiastic about broken bones, my visual art explorations have become my new outlet.”You have to admit that all of these concepts blow your mind in one way or another. They do look real to me.

More of Chad Knight‘s amazing digital art can be found at https://www.instagram.com/chadknight.

 

 

Any Reaction is a Good Reaction

I wanted to address the reactions to yesterday’s Sunday Evening Art Gallery, Bruno Pontiroli. Bruno is a surrealist, and his paintings are creative in an uncomfortable way.

Those of you who responded that they made you uncomfortable; that you didn’t really care for the vibes the images gave you — Thank you. I can’t tell you how good feedback feels.

That is the purpose of Art. 

I don’t remember how I found Bruno, but I’ve had him in my gallery repertoire for some time. His paintings are clear and expressive. But the images themselves made me take a step back and wonder. Should I? Or shouldn’t I?

I honestly enjoy all the artists I highlight. In that same vein, I’m not always comfortable with their art.

Look at Zdzisław Beksiński. or Anton Semenov.  H.R. Giger. Even some of Salvador Dali‘s work is mind bending. Who knows what their motivation was.. Haunting visions of reality.

Some art is really hard to look at. To understand. Hard to like.

I am proud of those of you who had adverse reactions to yesterday’s art and said so. You said nothing derogatory about the artist — just the form the artist took.

Keep your minds open.

Its good for you, it’s good for the world of art. If a certain style or piece of art stirs something inside of you — good OR bad — then the artist has achieved what they’ve worked a life time to achieve.

A Reaction.

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Bruno Pontiroli

Bruno Pontiroli is a French surreal artist, whose aim is to “turn the narrow vision that we have of the world upside down and disturb our imagination while shaking an accepted reality with images that are as comprehensible as they are familiar”.In Bruno’s fascinating and unusual body of work, he begins his artworks with easily-recognized animals that he then shapes “the way a child plays with modeling clay or a building set.”An admirer of René Magritte, Bruno finds inspiration in situations, books and images that surround him.Pontiroli creates mind-bending explorations of the relationship between humans and animals.The artist shies away from labeling his work as Surrealist or Dadaist, instead proposing a new version of reality without categorization.His work is so enjoyable precisely because it’s familiar yet strange.According to Pontiroli, “My aim is turn the narrow vision that we have of the world upside down and disturb our imagination while shaking an accepted reality with images that are as comprehensible as they are familiar. Distorting a symbol or mixing opposing universes allows me to question the identity of things so that I can reinvent them.”

More of Bruno Pontiroli‘s  mind-bending work can be found at https://www.instagram.com/brunopontiroli.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery (flashback) — Svetlana Bobrova

I think one of my favorite Sunday Evening Art Gallery posts was from back in November, 2014, when I shared images from the artist Svetlana Bobrova. A surrealistic artist from Russia, the figures in her paintings are hauntingly beautiful. I cannot get enough of her and her imagination.

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can see more of Svetlana Bobrova‘s amazing work at my Sunday Evening Art Gallery blog or at the blue link above.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Christine Van Sickle

Christine Van Sickle‘s creative journey started in the early 1990’s. In 1994 she had her first art piece published in the Green Bay Press Gazette, and from then on she was hooked.Van Sickle has always loved the creative process, and later in life it became a much needed escape from the daily stresses of life.Van Sickle’s work includes realism and surrealism pieces. They are often nature inspired,  and  usually start as a normal landscape or animal.She has worked with ink, watercolor, and other mediums, but prefers acrylic on canvas.The artist makes a point to listen and watch other artists. She also encourages others to pick up a brush and try it themselves.

More of Christine Van Sickle‘s artwork can be found at www.cvansicklestudios.com, or her Instagram page https://www.instagram.com/cvansicklestudios/. 

Send inquiries (custom, original art, or print requests) to cvansickle16@gmail.com.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Zdzislaw Beksinski

Zdzislaw Beksinski (1929-2005) was a was a renowned Polish painter, photographer, and fantasy artist.

His work reflected his preference for the obscure.His paintings concocted up odd images in the mind, and were a true step into absurdity in the field of dystopian surrealism.Beksinski was a very innovative artist, especially for one working in a Communist country. In the 1970s he entered what he himself called his “fantastic period”, which lasted up to the late 1980s. This is his best known period, during which he created very disturbing images, showing a surrealistic, post-apocalyptic environment with very detailed scenes of death, decay, landscapes filled with skeletons, deformed figures, deserts, all very detailed, painted with his trademark precision, particularly when it came to rough, bumpy surfaces.  Beksinski’s later years were ones filled with tragedy.  His wife, Zofia, died in 1998, and a year later, on Christmas Eve 1999, his son Tomasz (a popular radio presenter, music journalist and movie translator) committed suicide. Beksiński’s life reached a most brutal and melancholy end in 2005, when he was stabbed to death at his Warsaw apartment by a 19-year-old acquaintance from Wołomin, reportedly because he refused to lend the teenager money.Perhaps his art had always reflected the darkness that one day would reflect the end of his life.More of Zdzislaw Beksinski‘s haunting work can be found at https://www.shopbeksinski.com/

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Remedios Varo

 Remedios Varo  (1908-1963) was born in Spain. Remedios always struggled to combine the mythic with the scientific, the sacred with the profane.

Remedios decided to evade the civil war that was going on in Spain and moved instead to Paris where the art movements were in vogue.

In Europe she was influenced by the surrealist movement and metaphysics studies. She was motivated by ancient studies and literature, but also by physics, mathematics, engineering, biology and psychoanalysis.

After some years, she decided to move to Mexico with a friend she met in Europe. In Mexico, her real journey as an artist started.

Her characters are mystical and solitary; most of the times involved in scientifical activities. They often have almond-shaped eyes, and androgynous features.

Diverse characters emerge in her painting with unusual attitudes: contemplative, passive, highly symbolic; reflection of the instability which can be overcome or changed.

All of them are part of a unique world which involves developed concepts of magic and imagination.

 

More of Remedios Varo‘s fantastic works can be found at http://www.remediosvaro.org/ and http://www.angelfire.com/hiphop/diablo4u/remedios.html

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Kris Kuski

Born March 2nd 1973,  Kris Kuski spent his youth in rural seclusion and isolation along with a blue-collar working mother, two much older brothers and absent father.Open country, sparse trees, and later alcoholic stepfathers, perhaps paved the way for an individual saturated in imagination and introversion.

His fascination with the unusual lent to his macabre art later in life. The grotesque to him as it seemed, was beauty.

 His work shows the corrupt and demoralized fall of modern-day society, a place where new beginnings, new wars, new philosophies, and new endings all exist.

Through his intricate 3-D sculptural work, we see both the beautiful and dark side of our minds.

Kris’s work is intricate, fascinating, and incredibly mesmerizing. Look close, look often.

More of Kris Kuski‘s work can be found at http://www.kuksi.com/ 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — H.R. Giger

It’s sometimes funny how your first introduction to an artist is through everyday things — like album covers.

H.R. Giger (1940-2014), one of the preeminent artists of Fantastic Realism, was a Swiss surrealist painter, sculptor and set designer known for his biomechanical creatures, extraterrestrial landscapes and disturbing, though memorable, imagery of grotesque sensuality.

Giger discovered the airbrush and, along with it, his own unique freehand painting style, leading to the creation of many of his most well known works.

Giger kept a notepad next to his bed so he could sketch the terrors that rocked his uneasy sleep — nightmarish forms that could as easily have lumbered from prehistory as arrived from Mars.

Giger’s art enters the rarified realm of the near magical, and certainly the land of genius.

But this generous and humble artist avoided the limelight and rather let his work speak volumes of his mastery.

The most famous book with publications of his drawings and landscapes was the “Necronomicon” of 1977.

It was Giger’s published book Necronomicon that inspired Ridley Scott’s Alien.

His work is surrealistic, magical, detailed, and plainly gorgeous.

More of H.R. Giger‘s work can be found at http://www.hrgiger.com/ and http://visualmelt.com/H-R-Giger.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Jacek Yerka

Jacek Yerka was born in Toruń, Poland, in 1952.

gardeners_garden

Yerka studied fine art and graphics prior to becoming a full-time artist in 1980.

As a child, Yerka loved to draw and make sculptures. He hated playing outside, and preferred to sit down with a pencil, creating and exploring his own world.

jacek-yerka-04

Yerka resisted pressures of his instructors to adopt the less detailed techniques of contemporary art and continued to work in the classic, meticulous Flemish style he still favors to this day.

He creates surrealistic compositions Based on precise painting techniques, taking pattern from former masters like Jan van Eyck or Hieronymus Bosch.

Like many artists, Yerka pulls on thoughts and memories of his past to create these marvelous artworks.

four_seasons

Yerka’s carefully rendered paintings (acrylics on canvas) are filled with images from the artist’s childhood, one heavily influenced by the surroundings of his home during the 1950’s, and his grandmother’s kitchen, where he spent much of his time.

dragon_pleasure

According to Yerka, “My greatest source of inspiration is always (and I bet will be) my childhood souvenirs – that places, remembered feelings, fragrances and technique of 1950s .”

jacek_yerka_gardens_sad poziomkowy

More of Jacek Yerka‘s wonderful art can be found at the Morpheus Gallery  and at his website http://www.yerkaland.com/.