Sunday Evening Art Blog — Secret Woods Rings

One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them.

~~Lord of the Rings

More unique and gorgeous rings can be found at https://www.mysecretwood.com/.

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New Galleries Open at the Gallery!!

As we head into the “Last Vacation Weekend of the Summer”, I want to show off a couple of new Sunday Evening Galleries I’ve added recently.  I have to admit the images are stunning, the artwork remarkable. Please go check them out if you get time!

Jellyfish

   http://wp.me/p5LGaO-Pt

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Face Off

http://wp.me/p5LGaO-P1

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Earrings

http://wp.me/s5LGaO-earrings

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Natalya Sots

http://wp.me/p5LGaO-ND

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See you on the other side of Reality!

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Fabergé

 

The Age of Faberge6bc106705542b2a887bbfa8f696e5259

The age of elegance, of decadence

Coronation Egg 1897

The series of exquisite eggs shaped by Faberge for the Imperial Russian family between 1885 and 1916, is considered as the artist-goldsmith’s ultimate and most long-term achievement.

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Gold, diamonds, rubies, enamel, all decorate the over-the-top gifts to the Russian Tsars Alexander III and Nicholas II as Easter gifts for their wives and mothers.

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 These are often referred to as the ‘Imperial’ Fabergé eggs.

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The House of Fabergé made about 50 eggs, of which 43 have survived.

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Two more were planned for Easter 1918, but were not delivered, due to the Russian Revolution.

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It was a time of rarity; of riches beyond compare, and poverty unimagined.

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And from those Easter gifts created long ago, a name, a heritage, was born.

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 Fabergé.

Charmed

When I was in high school, charm bracelets (along with getting “pinned”) were the big thing. Some girls had wads of charms so thick they would leave dents in the wooden desk tops. Others, like mine, had a half dozen mementoes of graduation, birthdays, and a few others that, to this day, still make me wonder what they stood for.

 These days there are expensive, modern versions of the charm bracelet. Some have bead-type charms you string on sterling bracelets, everything from baby carriages to roses to moms charms to birthstones. There are token charms hanging in displays in department stores, shopping malls and internet jewelry stores, still an ode to the special moments of one’s life.

 I no longer have bangle jangle charms around my wrist, but I do have a handful of sparkles on a simple, long, not-gold necklace that I often wear. What’s on my necklace?  Well, I’ve got rings that my kids bought for me when they were in kindergarten, a ring that symbolizes my role-playing days, a silver “coin” for money, a rune with “enlightenment” carved on it, a dream catcher that used to be an earring, a plastic blue unicorn with his horn broken off, a faerie holding a blue globe (also a remnant from a pair of earrings) ― all sorts of nonsense that brings back memories and keeps me in good spirits.

 Do you have a charm bracelet or necklace? What hangs from your life’s testimony? What kinds of charms do you wear? Of if you could put one together, what charms would you add?