Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Amber Cowan

Amber Cowan is an artist and educator living in Philadelphia.She is a faculty member of the glass department of Tyler School of Art, where she received her MFA in 2011 in Glass/Ceramics.Cowan’s sculptural glasswork is based around the use of recycled, upcycled, and second-life American pressed glass.She uses the process of flameworking, hot-sculpting and glassblowing to create large-scale sculptures that overwhelm the viewer with ornate abstraction and viral accrual.

With an instinctive nature towards horror vacui (filling of the entire surface of a space or an artwork with detail),  her pieces reference memory, domesticity and the loss of an industry through the re-use of common items from the aesthetic dustbin of American design.The primary material used for her work is glass cullet sourced from scrap yards supplied by now defunct pressed glass factories as well as flea-markets, antique-stores and donations of broken antiques from households across the country.Cowan uses these found pieces to create remarkable one-of-a-kind objects that reference the rise and fall of US glassware manufacturing, while simultaneously offering a new narrative.More of Amber Cohen‘s amazing glasswork can be found at https://ambercowan.com/.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Dino Rosin

 

Dino Rosin was born in Venice, Italy on May 30, 1948.

At the age of twelve, he left school and began work as an apprentice at the Barovier and Toso glassworks where he remained until he joined his brothers, Loredano and Mirko, at their factory, Artvet, in 1963.

Rosin continued at Artvet until 1975 when he moved to Loredano’s newly established studio as his assistant. There he collaborated with his brother for almost 20 years.

He was Loredano’s right hand in the “piazza” and a master in his own right in cold work.

In 1988, Dino Rosin was invited to Pilchuck Glass School in the state of Washington to teach solid freehand glass sculpture with Loredano and the American glass artist, William Morris.

In 1992,. Dino assumed the role of “maestro” and began single-handedly to produce his brother’s old designs and ultimately his own.,

His skillful use of Calcedonia glass (glass made with silver and other elements  developed in Murano during the mid fifteenth century) is unique and makes his pieces recognizable and highly collectible.

Dino rediscovered the formula for this unique, striated glass and has continued to improve the coloration.

Today he is able to achieve brilliant cobalt blues, deep rose and even a fiery red, varying on the metals used, temperature and duration the glass is in the furnace.

Each piece is different; the exact flow of lines and color of calcedonia cannot be duplicated.

More of Dino Rosin‘s beautiful glasswork can be found at https://www.paragonfineart.com/artists/dino-rosin.html and https://www.rosinartestudio.com/en/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Shayna Leib

 

Shayna Leib is a modern multimedia artist with an amazing sense of material.Leib was educated at the Polytechnic University of California in San Luis Obispo, where she studied philosophy, literature, visual arts and music.She was supposed to defend her doctorate in philosophy, but instead went to the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she began to study sculpture with glass and metal.Working mostly with glass, Leib paid maximum attention to the study of the properties of this unique-beautiful material.Her sculptural studies reflect an attention to detail indicative of the two major influences on her life — music and philosophy.She prefers to use glass not for its mimetic qualities to capture the look of other materials, but for it’s ability to express flow, freeze a moment in time, and manipulate optics.Lieb, like anyone, is deeply attracted to the seductive pull of decadent desserts.“This body of work started as a therapeutic exercise in deconstruction and a re-training of the mind to look at dessert as form rather than food,” says Leib in an artist statement about her series Patisserie.“It soon became a technical riddle, and I became a food taxidermist of french pastries.”

More of Shayna Leib’s remarkable glass works can be found at https://shaynaleib.com/patisserie/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Martin Blank

Martin Blank is one of North America’s premiere figurative glass sculptors with a style quintessentially his own.

Creating tension between sculptural forms that evoke compelling landscapes revealed by the juxtaposition of sculptural elements, Blank’s work is about carving space.Martin Blank was born August 29, 1962 and received his BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1984.

That same year, Blank moved west to begin his professional career in Seattle, working at the center for studio glass and learning from the driving force behind it, Dale Chihuly.Blank worked on the Chihuly team, bringing his infectious enthusiasm and courageous desire to push the material for several years, all the while establishing his own contributions to the glass movement.Whether it is a collection of flower blossoms, a monumental abstract installation, or a figurative sculpture, Martin Blank’s hot sculpted glass is made with a combination of technical exactitude and creative exuberance.

His working relationship with glass is an intimate one, as he wears heat protective clothing, gets very close, and employs his entire body while molding the molten material. 

Intuitive and deliberate, he is nonetheless open to enhancing his visual vocabulary with the happy accidents of glasswork.

More of Martin Blank‘s amazing glasswork can be found at https://www.martinblankstudios.com/

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery (midweek) — Naoko Ito

 

Naoko Ito is a Japanese artist based in New York.Born and raised in Tokyo, Japan, Ito received a BA in Science of Design with a concentration in museum studies from Musashino Art University.Her project “Urban Nature” was inspired by the relationship between man and nature.Ito cuts the branches of trees into several pieces and places them in glass jars.Her choice of material originally stems from a desire to replicate the luminosity and fragility of ice, a natural material that shares the quality of preservation with jars.Stacked precariously on the concrete, the works are evidence of an unfaltering hand.Her offerings are unique, fragile, and symbolic.More of Naoko Ito’s exhibition can be found on her website, https://naokoito.com. 

 

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Niyoko Ikuta

A sculpture made of glass that appears as if flowing effortlessly like water, exuding a dancing rhythm – such is the beauty created by Japanese artist Niyoko Ikuta.

The artist started making these sculptures in 1980, as she was fascinated by and explored the capacity of light to reflect and refract while passing through broken sections of plate glass.Thus she laminated together sheets of glass, exposing their cross sections to create these sculptures.Breaking boundaries of imagination, in these sculptures the artist gives form to feelings of “gentleness and harshness, fear, limitless expansion experienced through contact with nature, images from music, ethnic conflict, the heart affected by joy and anger, and prayer.”The one thing that makes this art form so engaging and accessible is that these are not arbitrary forms created for aesthetic appeal.Rather, they stimulate and bring forth these feelings in the viewer, breathing life into their surroundings.More of Niyoko Ikuta‘s delicate work can be found at https://lighthouse-kanata.com/artists/niyoko-ikuta and http://www.artnet.com/artists/niyoko-ikuta/.

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Paul Stankard

Paul Stankard is an internationally acclaimed artist and pioneer in the studio glass movement..During his ten year scientific glassblowing career, he became a master of fabricating complex instruments.In 1972, Paul left industry to pursue his dream of being creative in glass full time.His translucent orbs bursting with activity and life are made entirely from glass.When Stankard suddenly directed a decade of industrial glass working techniques into the interpretation of flowers, bees, vines, and leaves encased in glass, it wasn’t long before art dealers discovered his work and he began to create art full-time.According to Stankard, ““By blending mysticism with magical realism, I work to express organic credibility through my botanical interpretations.”“Crafted in glass, I reference the continuum of nature and celebrate on an intimate level her primal beauty.”

More of Paul Stankard’s amazing glasswork can be found at http://www.paulstankard.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery (flashback) — Luke Jerram

Way back in October of 2014, I asked the question:

Glass is exquisite in its delicate beauty. A crystal vase, a hand-blown wine glass, a stained-glass window, all stir the pot of reactions that make the word “sparkle” sparkle. Working with glass is an incredible art. It is so delicate, so refined, a true art of mind over matter. So what if glass represents a disease? Is it still “sparkling” and “refined”?

In the midst of today’s pandemic, Luke Jerram seems to have found a way.

 

Covid19-Coronavirus

 

 

Foot-and-Mouth Disease

 

 

Avian flu

 

 

salmonella

 

 

Zika virus

 

 

Ebola

 

 

HIV

 

These, and other microscopic cells and diseases made of sparkling glass, can be found at my Sunday Evening Art Gallery and at https://www.lukejerram.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery (midweek) — Tiffany Lamps

A Tiffany Lamp is a type of lamp with a glass shade made with glass designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany and his design studio.Famously associated with the Art Nouveau movement, the extravagantly decorative Tiffany lamps are rare and highly-sought collectors’ items.Hand crafted, the iconic stained glass lamps, lamp shades, lights and window panels were created by soldering together small pieces of colored glass to produce enchanting and individual objects.Genuine Tiffany lamps were made between 1890 and 1930.Tiffany studios used confetti glass which changes color when the lamp is lit. They have a bronze base; however, there were no zinc, wood or plastic versions.Over twenty years of time, Tiffany designed many specific styles of his lamps.Most of his luminaries can be grouped into one of seven specific categories, defining their detailed characteristics: the Irregular Upper and Lower Border, Favrile, Geometric, Transition to Flowers, Flowered Cone, and Flowered Globe Lamps.Genuine Tiffany lamps can be found at reputable dealers and websites across the Internet.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Melissa Schmidt

Lamp worker and designer Melissa Schmidt works out of her 120 year+ studio  in St.Louis, Missouri.

Inspired by her antique blown glass buttons, her work is whimsical and unexpected as the buttons she found two decades ago.

Her glass mastery is mostly self taught, having experimented with years of refining techniques.

Schmidt’s work is at once tactile, visual and auditory as movement creates delight for the wearer and observer.

She uses borosilicate glass material with frit, glass powder, grinding, sewing, and 35 mm slide film, as well as foils and precious metals.

Schmidt’s creativity is a delight to the eye, a unique sparkle in the world of jewelry.

More of Melissa Schmidt‘s amazing glass work can be found at http://www.melissaschmidtstudio.com/.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery (on Saturday) — Carol Milne

Carol Milne is known worldwide for her unique knitted glass work, for which she won the Silver Award at the 2010 International Exhibition of Glass in Kanazawa, Japan.

Milne received a degree in Landscape Architecture from the University of Guelph, Canada in 1985, but realized in her senior year that she was more interested in sculpture than landscape.  She has been working as a sculptor ever since.  Carol is the lone pioneer in the field of knitted glass.  Determined to combine her passion for knitting with her love for cast glass sculpture, she developed a variation of the lost wax casting process to cast knitted work in glass.“I see my knitted work as metaphor for social structure.  Individual strands are weak and brittle on their own, but deceptively strong when bound together.”“You can crack or break single threads without the whole structure falling apart.  And even when the structure is broken, pieces remain bound together.  The connections are what bring strength and integrity to the whole and what keep it intact.”Her glasswork is wonderfully unique and creative, reflecting a mind and ability that pushes the limits of the material through persistent and relentless experimentation.

More of Carol Milne‘s unique glasswork can be found at https://www.carolmilne.com.