A Day for Projects

It’s funny how creativity ebbs and flows.

One minute you are so full of words that nothing but writing a book can be their outlet. Other times you stare at at the screen, typing One Upon a Time 60 times because you can’t think of anything to write down.

One minute you have this great quilt idea, the next minute, as you start collecting materials, you find nothing reflects your idea.

I have two personal friends who have added painting to their creative repertoire, and honestly are very good at that, too. 

Maybe it’s the seasons that change our creative move. The need to be outdoors more, alive and singing with the birds and dancing with the bees.

Yeah — I can see me doing both.

But there is a different feel to spring than fall, summer than winter. What excited you last winter often disappears or, better yet, metamorphoses into something new and different.

Do you change crafts as the Earth changes seasons?

We all stick to our basic first love. Of that I don’t doubt. But when I read blogs where artists are trying collages instead of knitting or making miniatures instead of pop up cards, I am delighted. One good friend has turned from crocheting to repainting and redecorating her bedroom.

It’s a great feeling to get your feet wet in self expression.

Even if we don’t know what we’re doing, the enjoyment of learning just for the sake of learning is unmatchable. 

Maybe that’s why so many have so many projects going at one time. I’m going to make a collage for my sister! I’m going to paint the landscape behind my house! I picked up this new book at a garage sale the other day; think I’ll start reading tonight! I’m going to sew beautiful trim on a bunch of hand towels! I’m going to … I’m going to … I’m going to …

And here we are. Starting all over again. Or continuing where we left off last week or last month. Give us a little background music, a little work area, and voila! We are off on another adventure.

I myself am fighting between continuing my next book, making enough Angel Tears for the craft fair in September, figuring out how to put a book online, and keeping the weeds out of my new pop up/out garden. I feel like I’m at the beginning of a mountain trail, but at least I know I have company on my way up.

How about you and your pastimes? Any new ones creeping in?

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Morgana Wallace

 

Morgana Wallace is a Victoria, British Columbia based artist.Her mixed media compositions are created through a fine treatment of collage working the paper to create multiple layers and various textures.Additionally, she will apply gauche to many of her works to add detail.Each piece brings together references of various mythologies with fantastical and dream like elements, creating engaging and complex works of art.Wallace often uses Japanese linen paper in her work because of her attraction to its texture, mixing it with thin card stock to create her characters’ flowing hair.Other materials used in her works include X-ACTO knives, water colors, gouache, and pencil crayons.To create depth and shadows she also uses foam board which adds to the painterly quality of her scenes.

More of Morgana Wallace‘s work can be found at http://www.madronagallery.com/artists/morgana-wallace. 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Mark Messersmith

 

Mark Messersmith (1955-)  was born in Kansas City, Missouri lives and works in Tallahassee, Florida where he teaches at Florida State University.

The artist extends beyond the frame of his central images surveying man’s ruin. He also includes a small frieze of vignettes at the bottom and sculptural adornments at the frame’s edge.

His work explores themes of spirit and struggle within the modern world’s natural environments.

Messersmith likes to focus on the habitats of Florida’s animals in the way they live and react to one another.

In his words, “My work is really about our relationship to all other living creatures at this precarious moment, a place midway between hope and despair.”

His works reflect plants and animals, which are still able to survive,  often in small isolated natural habitats, and the effects of their inevitable forced migration, dislocation, or isolation.

His works build on stories (either real or conjectured), along with observations and concerns for the creatures that move within the shrinking environs they inhabit.

More of Mark Messersmith‘s inspirational work can be found at https://markmessersmith.com.