Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Chris Garofalo

Chris Garofalo grew up in Springfield, Illinois, earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree at Saint Mary’s College, Notre Dame, in South Bend, Indiana, and has been living in Chicago since 1980. 

Following extensive experience with printmaking and graphic design, Garofalo was introduced to ceramics.The artist creates ceramic sculptures that draw inspiration from plant and animal forms.An avid gardener, Garofalo took quickly to the medium, finding gardening and ceramics very similar, especially in smell (the clay and the dirt) and the condition in which both activities leave her hands.Garofalo’s sculptures blur the distinction between land, sea and air, plant and animal kingdoms.By applying the principle properties of development, and by ignoring genetic, behavioral, environmental, social and mating restrictions, Garofalo creates a re-imagined evolutionary history of forms at once recognizable and unidentifiable.Her work is intricate yet delicate, expressive of earthly forms that could have existed had conditions been different.

More of Chris Garofalo’s amazing ceramics can be found at https://www.chrisgarofalo.com/.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Betty Woodman

Betty Woodman (1930-2018) is internationally recognized as one of the most important ceramic artists working today.
Through her inventive use of color and form and her expert blend of a wide range of influences, Woodman created exuberant and captivating ceramic sculptures.

A leading ceramist whose inventive forms and painterly use of color won her international renown, Woodman began her career making simple functional pottery.During the Pattern and Decoration movement in the ’70s, her career gained the momentum it has had ever since.

Collaborating with important figures in the Pattern and Decoration movement, she began producing colorful, witty — and nonfunctional — vessels decorated with scenes from the Italian Renaissance or slathered with landscape clouds. 
Woodman’s most famous works include her Pillow Pitchers, in which she crafted a vessel out of a bulbous shape pinched at both ends like a pillow. 
Betty Woodman‘s works can be found across the Internet and at such refined places as the Smithsonian and the Frank Lloyd Wright Gallery.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Carol Long

Born in 1965, Carol Long was raised on a farm in Stafford County Kansas.

.Working from a family farm studio in Kansas, Carol reproduces the beauty of her surrounding environment into her pieces using floral and insect motifs, combined with flowing lines, merging into leaf and  plant details

Pieces are made by a variety of methods such as throwing, slabwork, extrusions, and hand building, along with pulled handles and  attached  multiple pieces that are textured with presses, slip trailing, stains and glazes.

 Her work continues to evolve as she experiments with new ways of expressing the tiny beautiful intrinsic qualities of nature that we often take for granted.

Originally inspired to be an artist by her mother, she has also received inspiration from her three children, which explains the carefree whimsy evident in her pottery.More of Carol Long‘s pottery can be found at http://www.carollongpottery.com/. 

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Katerina Kamprani

 Athens-based architect Katerina Kamprani‘s redesigns formerly useful everyday objects in her Uncomfortable series.

 The goal was to re-design useful objects making them uncomfortable but usable and maintain the semiotics of the original item.

Kamprani calls Uncomfortable “a collection of deliberately inconvenient everyday objects,” adding that “it exists in sketches and 3-D visualizations and has no meaningful purpose.”

Kamprani first started the project for no apparent reason other than she wanted to design something, and making things uncomfortable was challenging and amusing to her.

“My project is very carefully designed to annoy — it feeds from the design of each original object and makes a little joke.”

“I am hoping it is not in the list of ‘another badly designed object’ but in the list of extraordinary deliberately badly designed object(s).”

She is an architect and does the work of a rational engineer by day. By night, she is a design enthusiast, interested both in graphic and product design.

More of Katerina Kamprani‘s wonderfully unique art can be found at http://www.kkstudio.gr/#the-uncomfortable.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Natalya Sots

 Natalya Sots is an artist originally from Pavlodar, Kazakhstan but has lived in Chicago’s suburb of Schaumburg since 2002.

 

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Natalya got started as an artist in high school when she worked at a ceramics factory where she decorated the dishes before they were glazed and fired.

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Prior to graduation from college, Natalya started working as an art teacher at a private art school in Pavlodar.

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She was given a course in ceramics as the medium to introduce these children to the wonderful world of art, and was asked to develop a program for it.

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She developed her technique and style while working on the program for kids.

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Natalya’s whimsical ways have turned her love of art into a cornicopia of lucious ceramics, bright and intricate.

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From butter dishes to cups and teapots, Natalya Sots colorful creations can be found at http://www.natalyasots.com/

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Dawn Whitehand

Australian abstract artist Dawn Whitehand starts off her “about” page this way:

I am an Australian artist, making unique mixed media sculptures from clay, found objects and textured materials which are based on organic natural forms.

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I have always thought of myself as a traditionalist when it came to Art — Renoir, Rembrandt, Redlin — those people I can understand.

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I never really paid attention to Abstract Art until I wandered into Dawn’s world.

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Working from my studio on the outskirts of Ballarat at the base of a slumbering volcano, I am very aware of my environment, its constant changing, and its vulnerability. I am also very aware of the current global environmental crisis.

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Within this context my art practice attempts to address these issues by making sculptural artworks that attempt to remind, though subliminally, the viewer of their innate connection to the Earth, and our reliance upon it for survival.

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And I started to understand. A little. That all art doesn’t have to be literal. That trees don’t have to look like trees, and volcanoes didn’t have to look like volcanoes.

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That Art, like Emotions, like Life, is different for everyone. Some just choose to share their unique view through creative arts.

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The thrill of interpretation is the same thrill we take with each breath.  And that there’s always someone willing to share their breath — and view — with you.

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Dawn is a multi-talented spirit. She creates jewelry and pottery and custom-made art sculptures. You can find her art at https://dawnwhitehand.wordpress.com, and contemporary poems, art, and drawings at https://apoemandadrawingaday.wordpress.com/.

Stop by and learn a little bit of Abstract Art for yourself.