Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Motohiko Odani

Sometimes an artist’s description by others is as mesmerizing as their art.

Motohiko Odani (1972-) was born and raised in Kyoto, Japan, and received his MFA from Tokyo University of the Arts in 1997.

According to one creative description, “Odani, who possesses a keenly critical understanding of sculpture, has resisted (or taken advantage of) the medium’s conventional image of weightiness or substance.”

“Instead, he has given physical representation to ‘phantoms’ – entirely ephemeral sensations or amorphous phenomena.”

Odani’s works are comprised of complex layers of meaning that defy a singular interpretation, as the artist draws inspiration from various sources including horror and sci-fi films, Japanese folklore, Buddhism, and Futurism.

This last description matches Motohiko’s intrinsic art:  “With Odani’s artworks transcending the conventional idea of sculpture and seeking to give visual representation to existence itself, this exhibition pursues new possibilities for artistic expression.”

I think that’s a perfect description.

More of Motohiko Odani‘s amazing art can be found at http://www.phantom-limb.com/ and http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2011/01/motohiko-odani/.

Coming Attractions

My research folders for my Sunday Evening Art Gallery are bursting at the seams with new creative artists! I am so psyched at the amazing talents I’ve found that I’m almost tempted to open a second evening’s showing — Thursday Evening Wine and Art Gallery or Thursday Tea and Art or Thursday Evening Art Walk something like that.  (Suggestions are welcome!)

Here is a peek of coming attractions:

Tell your family — tell your friends — every Sunday evening, and perhaps every Thursday evening, you will find magical art and artists here at Humoring the Goddess, then in excess at the Sunday Evening Art Gallery.

My creative artists will thank you.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Nick Veasley

British photographer Nick Veasey uses industrial X-ray machines to discover what makes up the natural world and highlight the surprising, inner beauty in some of the most common objects.

Veasey got the idea to use X-ray machines for art while dating the daughter of a truck driver who was transporting thousands of soda cans, one of which contained a prize worth 100,000 pounds.

He rented an X-ray machine from a local hospital to find the winning can. Although he was unsuccessful, he credits this moment for sparking the idea that launched his career.

Due to the high risk of working with radiation, Veasey custom built a concrete structure to contain it.

To get his pictures, subjects are placed on a lead surface with film behind it. The X-rays pass through the subject and then onto the film where from there he can control the exposure time in a separate room.

Veasey doesn’t actually use any human subjects, as they would have to endure radiation for about 12 minutes. Instead, when a model is needed, he uses skeletons in rubber suits or cadavers that have been donated to science.

Veasey focuses on finding an antidote to the “obsession with appearance” by revealing the beauty within.

Veasey’s work also comments on our society’s increasing paranoia and control by security and surveillance. “To create art with the technology … that helps remove the freedom and individuality in our lives … brings a smile to my face.”

More of Nick Veasley’s fantastic photography can be found at http://www.nickveasey.com/.

Exploration at the Art Gallery

When you work inside an office all week, one tends to fist pump the air when the weekend comes and the weather is beautiful. So I expect all of you to go outside and fist pump today, then when you come in this evening, put on some great relaxing music and come visit the Sunday Evening Art Gallery.

It’s easy to follow, and the art I’m coming across is so wonderfully beautiful and unique. I’m adding galleries all the time, plus adding more images to the ones I have.  Tell your friends! Say, “Man, have you checkout out that Sunday Evening Art Gallery? Man, that art is so awesome!” (or something to that effect…)

Happy Saturday!

Mihai Criste
Liu Bolon
Ice Sculptures
Minerals
Guido Daniele

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Marina Printseva

Talented and unique artist Marina Printseva was born in 1949 in the city of Pskov, Russia.

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She is a member of the Union of Artists of Russia, and a member of the International design and textiles Association.

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Her technique is a brilliant mixture of embroidery, painting and application.

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Marina created a special world filled with poetic images and metaphors influenced by Old World St. Petersburg

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Her work is populated by visions and shadows from the past.

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You can tell by the delicate work and mixed media that her visions are intricate and true.

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You can find more of Marina Printseva‘s inspirational work at Marina Printseva and unique-art-by-marina-printseva.

Sparkles from the Gallery on a Sparkling Saturday

It’s a beautiful Fall day outside today — cool temperatures, bright sunshine, the falling leaves whispering a sigh of sleep as they fall in a pile at the bottom of their trees. It’s a perfect day to be out and about, or sitting and writing, as long as life and sunshine are abundant.

I thought you might enjoy visiting some sparkles at the Sunday Evening Art Gallery this afternoon or this evening as well, so here are a few links and their sparkling companions.

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Dale Chiluly

Luke Jerram

Ice Sculptures

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Atmosphere, Art, and the Biltmore — Part 2

Art

Who doesn’t enjoy looking at the world through others eyes?

Who doesn’t have a painting of flowers or a scenery print or a portrait hanging on their wall?

Who hasn’t collected a glass vase or pottery mug or bronze sun to hang on their porch?

Art is created in a broad stroke with largest paint brush imagineable. It’s the appreciation of another’s work enough to research it, talk about it, collect it, share it. It depends on one’s perspective of life. One sees a sea of flowers; another a gateway of pain. One sees squiggles; another, divinity.

It’s all relative — it’s all Art.

Don’t compare what you see in an artist’s dream with what others see. If you’d like, read the artist’s explanation, then feel it, interpret it as you will. As with many other virtues, Art is an ideal all men strive for but often misunderstand. It is an expression of you but a reflection of others.

Some incredible interpretations found on my journey through North Carolina:

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Next:  the Biltmore

Tuesday-Not-Sunday-Evening Art-Gallery-Humor-Blog

They-Wait-in-Silence-4f6276864bf58_hiresI’m sure you’ve seen these posts on Facebook that show a wonderfully huge mansion in the woods/on the water/at the edge of the mountains, and the post says, “If you could live without WiFi and a phone and TV, etc., would you live here?”

Having spent the last five days up Nort’ , I think I can answer a solid “No.”

It wasn’t a mansion; it was a little house we call “The Cabin.” No TV, no Dish/Direct TV, no WiFi, just a DVD/8 Track Player and a radio. For getaway purposes it was ideal. But the times I tried to go online to do some Art Gallering, the signal from my phone was  烂摊子. A mess. So my wildly popular (I love adding my own adjectives) Sunday Evening Art Gallery had to take a Sunday night break.

I also wanted to spend some free time looking for unique artists, following a few leads from friends and followers (I’m always open for suggestions!). Grandkids were out playing, men fishing, cool breeze in the window, quiet except for the sounds of nature, it was a perfect Art Moment.

Yet I could not load any page other than the main one I landed on. No pictures, no links. And I felt like those people who can’t go to the bathroom without their cell phone. I felt helpless. And more than that — pathetic.

During this contemplation time I had a few revelations, too. I think we all get messages from the beyond…all get an idea which direction we should go. But we don’t listen. We — our ego — knows better. So we butt our heads against the wall and keep trying to recast the same pot.

What works for you? What feels right? What feels out-of-sorts? Are you happy with your blog? Are you happy with your craft? Would you sometimes rather do B than A? K rather than E?

I have found a new love affair with Unique Art. There are so many wonderful, unique, unusual artists sharing their work with the world that I’ve never heard of, never seen, never imagined until these past few years. And the thrill I get out of sharing them with you is the same thrill I get when I’ve written something good.

I can feel that same energy when I talk with people who are hooked into some sort of creativity. Their eyes glow, their breath shortens, and their dreams spill out through their words.

I want you to have that glow, too. I want you to sparkle like the fireworks on the 4th of July every time you think of your craft. You will crash and burn and agonize and think and dance and fly. But you will grow and learn and sparkle, too.

I suppose I will wait to introduce a new artist to the Sunday Evening Art Gallery. No need to rush amazement, is there? But because I can’t go long without sharing some kind of art, I will publish a new Gallery.

Don’t go too long without doing your creative thing, too!

Saturday Morning Reflections on Creativity

 

15 - 1[3]1112335Lazy Saturday mornings always bring out the philisopher in me. Especially when I listen to Martini Music from the 60s in the background.

Ever take one of those online tests — What is your favorite (fill-in-the-blank)?

Sometimes they’re easy. Favorite Food: Spaghetti. Favorite drink: Milk. (I know..boring…) Other times it’s a little catchy. Favorite Music? Ah…in what category? Favorite Book? Again, I need a genre. Favorite Dessert? Now, you really need to specify…

So it is with picking out an artist’s work for my Sunday Evening Art Gallery blog.

Sometimes it’s easy. Judit Czinkné Poór specializes in incredible cookie designs. Craig L. Haupt does whimsical abstract images. Jackson Pollock does…well, does Jackson Pollock things. The biggest problem with these artists are which 6 or 7 (or in the case of the larger Gallery, 12-15) images showcase their artistic range.

I come up with fantastic artists that span several techniques. Selecting which style or gallery to highlight is often an arduous task. Louise Bourgeois not only sculpted giant spiders but was actually best known for her representations of the female form and dreamlike imagery through paintings, prints, and installations. The Universe not only holds the glory of galaxies, but planets, stars, nebulas, gamma ray bursts, and galaxy clusters.  I have had artists that are not only great sculptors but painters and sketchers, too.

How do you decide which side of their diamond to polish?

I have learned that sometimes an artist’s fame is not the same as an artist’s flame. Often what strikes an audience as unique is not necessarily what made them famous. I highlighted Luke Jerram‘s extraordinary microbiology glass works, but if you read his website, he also designed a sculpture based on the Tōhoku Japanese Earthquake and subsequent tsunami of 2011, and solar-powered kinetic chandeliers  that consist of dozens of glass radiometers, which shimmer and flicker as they turn in the sunlight. Who knew?

Artists are such an eclectic lot. Writers, sculptors, painters, graphic designers, all have their favorite form of expression, their main obsession. But I imagine you can be 150% into oil painting and 150% into charcoal sketching and 150% into pen and ink and still find 150% to spend on computer graphics.

It’s all relative.

When I find an artist that I think my followers would enjoy, I research all their work. Often that’s a daunting task, for those who are truly creative, truly gifted, spread out in a hundred different directions at one time. One branch of their creativity is just as amazing as the next.

It’s not much easier when I pick a subject to highlight. In digging around, I often find 35-40 great representations under the headings of things like ice sculptures or paperweights. Each picture is more fascinating than the next. I try to include my favorites and others not in my top 10, just so I can show a fair representation of what the artist/subject is all about.  After all, my favorite color may be blue, but yours may be red. And who am I to confront the difference?

That, to me, is the essence of an art director. Of a museum curator. Exploring the creative mind, the unique palate, and choosing just the right combination of awe and familiarity to showcase. We all do this in our own way — look at the pictures hanging on your walls. The crystal pieces on your mantlepieces. The books on your shelves. The flowers in your garden. The colors you pick for your outfits. The way you arrange your bookshelves.

You have created your own atmosphere with the gifts from the creative world. You are abstract, you are conservative, you are orange-reds and country blue. You are Amish and Renaissance and Science Fiction and Chick Lit. You are poetry in motion, an art critic in your own right.

And that is a beautiful way to spend your life, isn’t it?

 

 

 

 

<a href="http://feedshark.brainbliss.com">Feed Shark</a>

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Meanderings

A busy weekend has taken me far away from my Artful meanderings. Taking care of family has superceded strolling down the softly-lit backstreet of the Sunday Evening Art Gallery.

So please sip your wine, your tea, your milk-in-in-a-wine-glass, and come peek at past Gallery surprises!

 

Raymond Bruin

Optical Illusionism

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Dawn Whitehand

Sculptor

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volcano

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Abandoned Cars

Photography

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Angelo Musco

Photography

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Louise Bourgeois

Sculptor

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Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Alexandre Duret-Lutz

Alexandre Duret-Lutz, a Paris-born photographer,  uses a Pentax K10D with fisheye lens to focus on spherical panoramas and Escheresque spirals.

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Expressed in technical terms, Alexandre calls his images “stereographic projections of equirectangular panoramas”.

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Using a sophisticated transformation process, Alexandre first builds a 360-degree x 180-degree panorama, then projects it to look like a small planet.

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His perspective makes his work beautiful and dizzying.

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His website Wee Planets reflect his fascination with curvature and panoramas.

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More of Alexandre Duret-Lutz‘s photography can be found at the following sites:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gadl/sets/72157594279945875/

http://www.creativetempest.com/phototrends/alexandre-duret-lutz/

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Be sure to go and take a whirl at his photography!

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Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Jewish Paper Cutting

Jewish paper cutting is a traditional form of Jewish folk art made by cutting figures and sentences in paper or parchment.

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It is connected with various customs and ceremonies, and associated with holidays and family life.

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Paper cuts often decorated ketubbot (marriage contracts), Mizrahs, and ornaments for festive occasions, and works of art.

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Paper cutting was practiced by Jewish communities in both Eastern Europe and North Africa and the Middle East for centuries and has seen a revival in modern times in Israel and elsewhere.

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Today, Jewish papercut art has grown in popularity beyond ritual items to art and expressions of Jewish faith, not only in Israel but worldwide.

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The sacredness of this ancient art is evident in the precise drawing and cutting of each piece.

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It was truly an exquisite form of art even the poor could do.

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though in the past few decades the art form has seen a veritable renaissance in Israel, with artists really pushing the medium to its thematic and technical limits.

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Examples of this fantastic hand-cut art can be found at  http://www.judaicpapercuts.com/,

http://www.papercutjudaica.com/ and http://www.nanrubin.net/, among others.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — René Lalique

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 René Lalique  (April 6, 1860 – May 5, 1945) was a master jeweller and glass designer during the Art Nouveau period.

His superior talent and creativity evolved over time and he developed his style to such an extent that he was able to dominate the Art Deco jewelry and glass market as well.

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He designed an array of beautiful pieces — glass perfume bottles, jewelry, vases, tableware, bottles, lighting, figurines, and in his later years, car hood ornaments.

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In the 1920s , his style morphed from the Art Nouveau nature-inspired forms, to more streamlined pieces to suit the Art Deco aesthetic.

Lalique’s glass pieces became more opalescent, produced by adding phosphates, fluorine and aluminum oxide to glass in order to make it opaque, and by adding tiny amounts of cobalt to produce an internal blue tint.

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His work passes the level of everyday to rare and extraordinary.

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More of   René Lalique‘s exquisite glassworks can be found at http://www.renelalique.com.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Mihai Criste

Mihai Criste (1975-) is a creative Romanian artist who is fascinated by abstraction, mystery and surrealism.

 His paintings are complex and simple at the same time.

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. Inspired by famous surrealists like Dali and Magritte, Criste soon found that he would need to move beyond their influences in order to truly find his own unique style of painting.

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The oustanding precision with which Mihai paints his surealistic works is absolutely fascinating and immediately catches the recipients attention.

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Mixing an uncanny eye on the themes of nature, Mahai is able to bring his work into the third dimension, allowing us to see all angles of several worlds at one time.

Criste explains his work this way: “My senses and seminification work together with my technical knowledge, which allows me to transcend my training into surrealistic creations.”

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You can fnd more of Mihai Criste‘s amazing art at his facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/mihaicriste.surrealism, or at  http://www.cuded.com/2012/01/surreal-paintings-by-mihai-criste/.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Spencer Byles

I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.  ~~ Henry David Thoreau

~

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Sculptural artist Spencer Byles spent a year creating beautiful sculptures out of natural and found materials throughout the unmanaged forests of La Colle Sur Loup, Villeneuve Loubet and Mougins, France.

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Surrounded by flora and fauna, Spencer used only cables and natural, found materials to create his stunning, large-scale works of art.

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One of the most beautiful things about his work is its temporary nature.

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The pieces were not intended to last — as life itself, each sculpture will eventually be reclaimed by the natural environment that helped Byles shape it.

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Spencer says, “The temporary nature of my sculptures is an important aspect of my experiences and understanding. I feel my sculptures are only really completed when nature begins to take hold again and gradually weave its way back into the materials. At this point it slowly becomes part of nature again and less a part of me.”

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More about Spencer Byles and his fantastic forest art can be found at:

http://frenchforestsculptures.blogspot.com

http://www.viralnova.com/spencer-byles/

http://www.boredpanda.com/forest-land-art-nature-spencer-byles/

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Natalya Sots

 Natalya Sots is an artist originally from Pavlodar, Kazakhstan but has lived in Chicago’s suburb of Schaumburg since 2002.

 

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Natalya got started as an artist in high school when she worked at a ceramics factory where she decorated the dishes before they were glazed and fired.

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Prior to graduation from college, Natalya started working as an art teacher at a private art school in Pavlodar.

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She was given a course in ceramics as the medium to introduce these children to the wonderful world of art, and was asked to develop a program for it.

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She developed her technique and style while working on the program for kids.

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Natalya’s whimsical ways have turned her love of art into a cornicopia of lucious ceramics, bright and intricate.

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From butter dishes to cups and teapots, Natalya Sots colorful creations can be found at http://www.natalyasots.com/

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Sunday Evening Art Gallery

www.sundayeveningartgallery.com

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This quiet evening I thought I would introduce you to world you may not know exists

A world filled with even more views of creative inspiration

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If you have enjoyed sitting back on Sunday Evenings

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enjoying the discoveries of creative artists of all genres

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Then you will love the full version of my Sunday Evening Art Gallery

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Click on any of these images and see more magic

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Explore more creations by these amazing artists, these amazing minds

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Art that is limited only by the artist’s imagination and talent

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I have collected dozens of extra images that could not fit on my Goddess blog

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Images that deserved their own gallery

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I add new galleries every week — I collect so many images on each journey my arms and blog cannot hold them all

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So please come and visit a world of unique images and unique artists

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Come see what creativity is really all about

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And if you like what you see, come back often.

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And please — tell your friends what a world you have discovered!

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www.sundayeveningartgallery.com

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — James Doran-Webb

Wild horses…couldn’t drag me away….

Rolling Stones

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The amazing power of life and freedom has been captured perfectly in sculptor James Doran-Webb’s breathtaking driftwood sculptures.

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The driftwood’s seemingly unique forms lend themselves perfectly to figures such as wolves and horses and dragons.

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Working together with a team of craftsmen, it can take 1,000 to 3,000 hours to make a life size sculpture, depending upon the complexities of the armature and anatomy.

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James started to design driftwood furniture in the early 2000’s and it was while playing with the various natural forms that he was drawn to experiment with his first driftwood animal sculpture.

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His large supply of wood has made it possible for him to find the pieces which most lend themselves to the natural form and shape needed to give his animals the movement and reality he strives to obtain in every piece he creates.

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James Doran-Webb believes that his art is meant to promote environmental consciousness.

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If I could make one person a little more aware of nature and the impact of nature on their lives I would be happy. I am a firm believer in our need to practice sustainable living in order to give future generations a better chance of survival.

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James Doran-Webb‘s fantastic driftwood sculptures can be found at his website, http://jamesdoranwebb.com; a great article also can be found at http://www.boredpanda.com/driftwood-dragon-sculptures-james-doran-webb/.