Sunday Evening Art Gallery (midweek) — Hinke Schreuders

Hinke Schreuders has been making small paintings or drawings on canvas with needle and thread since 2002. She draws on both 1950s advertising images of women and personal photographic material, attached them to linen, then added  embroidery and designs that heightens the beauty  of the photos.Her technique, embroidery, appears to be innocent, but her carefully constructed compositions evoke associations with more sinister undercurrents in a language that is prosaic and poetic at the same time. Ideas such as abstracted bubbles, flowers, and embroidery that resembles old-fashioned brocade drift in and out around the images.Schreuders art showcases real women behind the colors and patterns.With the added dimension of the surface embroidery, both the handiwork and the photo beneath become a new entity.Schreuders says she seeks to “subtly confuse notions of feminine vulnerability and reinforce the position of embroidery as an artistic medium.”

More of Hinke Schreuders‘ wonderful work can be found at http://sudsandsoda.com.

Creativity — Again and Again

John Lemke

I know that word is my catch phrase lately, and that lately has extended for the past few years in all kinds of directions.

I never went to college; I was one of those work-right-after-graduation kinda gals. I never took formal art classes of any sort, but I’ve always been in love with creativity.

Being “stuck” in our homes because of this Covid madness, I am finding more and more people are striking out on creative endeavors of their own. If for a commercial end or a play end, people are connecting with that fourth dimension and having the best time hanging out there.

I’ve mentioned before that I have quite a few creatives in my life; one best friend crochets these amazing blankets and jackets; one creates scrapbooks that are museum quality; one has taken to making impressively creative signs to hang around the house or patio. One friend from long ago makes quilts to die for, and another burns the most amazing animal scenes into wood.

Online, everywhere I turn I am finding people talking about their crafts. Even if it’s only in passing. I follow a potter, a quilter, and a number of painters, poets, and writers. Some of those I follow take gorgeous photographs. It’s everything and anything.

It’s so much fun, isn’t it?

Just when I think I’m burned out of ideas and inspiration, I come across someone who has done something wonderful and it gets me going again.

Creative people don’t need to be crafters, either. Some are redecorating their homes, including murals, colors, and textures. Some create garden scapes every spring. Some are refinishing furniture or restoring old cars.

It’s all in the movement.

It’s all about allowing yourself to have fun. Not judging your quality or quantity or expertise.

It’s all about finding that sparkle that’s buried deep inside you and letting it tickle you.

I myself have created what I am going to call Angel Tears, mobiles of a single fishing line made with mirrors and colored crystals. The Angel Tear is the big crystal teardrop that weights the mobile.

Who knows where this will lead. An art fair, an online business — or merely Christmas presents for family and friends.

If you have an inkling about doing something creative, stop thinking about it. Just do it. Don’t judge, unless it’s with your technique that will only improve with practice. Don’t worry who will like it, buy it, talk about it, or throw it away.

That’s not the purpose of art. Of ART.

Let’s have fun this Covid season! What have you got to lose?

Tell me — what is your side creativity project?

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery (midweek)–Debbie Smyth

Debbie Smyth is textile artist most identifiable by her statement thread drawings.These playful yet sophisticated contemporary artworks  are created by stretching a network of threads between accurately plotted pins.

Her work beautifully blurs the boundaries between fine art drawings and textile art, flat and 3D work, illustration and embroidery, literally lifting the drawn line off the page in a series of “pin and thread” drawings.Debbie plays with scale well,  creating both gallery installations and works for domestic interiors.

Her unique style  lends itself to suit corporate environments, public spaces, window display, set design, graphic design and illustration.By collaborating with interior designers, architects and other creative practitioners, Debbie pushes the expected scope of her work even further.

More of Debbie Smyth‘s remarkable thread drawings can be found at  debbie-smyth.com. 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Richard Preston

Talented Canadian artist Richard Preston has been experimenting with textures and shapes all his life.

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In 1979  Preston began to establish West Coast Jacket – the first in a series of military jackets.

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Beading or embroidering them, he creates a different story or on every jacket.

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Army clothing embroidered with the sun, clouds, scattering stars, river flows, flowers (including a lush pink wreath on the head of the skeleton symbolizing death), and  designs with a touch of psychedelic aesthetics, makes a strong and rather contradictory impression, turning each jacket – originally impersonal thing – in a unique and truly conceptual object.

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Preston, working with new material, draws attention to global problems, in particular, demilitarization.

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Preston does not limit himself by the narrow direction in art, trying himself as a painter, sculptor, designer, photographer, writer, actor, and musician.

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One of his hobbies was working with beads, and for nearly thirty years he made original creations, filled with real ethnic motifs and vibrant energies of the author.

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A series “stratigraphy” is devoted to geology. With ribbons, threads and beads, the artist tried to show different periods of his work, as well as layers of different rocks of the earth tells the story of its formation.

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More of Richard Preston’s work can be found at http://viola.bz/richard-prestons-textile-art/ and at http://www.prestvilleartsite.com/.

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