Sunday Evening Art Gallery (on Monday) — Jamie Moreno

How do select a truly unique jeweler/artist to showcase? There are as many jewelry designs as there are stars in the sky.

Jamie Moreno was born in 1943  in Madrid, Spain.

Not only is he a renowned jeweler, but a regal horse breeder of the Pure Spanish Race, “El Caballo de Pura Raza Espanola.” Designer of signature jewelry, Moreno has created numerous jewels, many of them published in International and Contemporary Jewelry Yearbooks and in different specialized journals.

Moreno displays his jewelry in various Spanish jeweler shops in Madrid, Marbella, Asturias and Castellón,  and in other  art galleries in Madrid.

In order to execute pieces of high jewelry he uses gold, silver, gems and semiprecious stones acquired in the most prestigious international gem fairs globally.His jewelry is modern, yet holds the tradition of centuries of fine jewelry craftmanship in Spain.

With his stunning ideas and beautiful, colorful exhibition of color in his pieces this designer honors some of his Spanish heritage.

More of Jamie Moreno‘s unique and signature jewelry can be found at www.jaimemoreno.com.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Rebecca Louise Law

Rebecca Louise Law is a London-based installation artist, best known for her breathtaking interactive large-scale installations consisting of thousands of suspended flowers. 

Rebecca is widely recognized for colossal floral artworks sculpted using her signature copper wire.She works with fresh or dry flora and allows the work to change naturally.Large scale artworks are site-specific, designed with the space, patron and local culture in mind.Smaller scale sculptures are encased in Victorian-style vitrines that
serve to preserve the contents – flowers, foliage and sometimes
insects – in a moment of time.Law has been working with natural materials and flowers for over 17 years. Her work is underpinned by her love of exploring the interlinked relationship between humanity and nature.Law is passionate about natural change and preservation, allowing her work to evolve as nature takes its course and offering an alternative concept of beauty.More of Rebecca Louise Law‘s amazing work can be found at https://www.rebeccalouiselaw.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Mandalas

A mandala is a geometric configuration of symbols with a very different application.

It can be understood in two different ways: externally as a visual representation of the universe, or internally as a guide for several practices that take place in many  traditions, including meditation.

The word mandala comes from Sanskrit, an ancient Indian language. Literally mandala means “circle.”

The circle is seen as a magical form, without beginning and end, just as the universe is believed to have no end.

In  religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Shintoism, it is used as a map representing deities, or specially in the case of Shintoism, paradises, kami or actual shrines.

The word mandala conjures up steady breathing and concentration patterns.

The circle is seen as a magical form, without beginning and end, just as the universe is believed to have no end.

. The mandala can also be filled with all kinds of patterns: geometric figures, Buddhist saints, flowers, designs, nature, and more.

Mandalas can be found in stained glass windows, floor paintings, paintings, carved pieces, books, scarves, clothing — any place you can focus on while mediating, praying, thinking, or dreaming.

Next time your heart or mind is racing, find a mandala that calls you,  take time to look at it’s beauty, and calm yourself.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Katerina Kamprani

 Athens-based architect Katerina Kamprani‘s redesigns formerly useful everyday objects in her Uncomfortable series.

 The goal was to re-design useful objects making them uncomfortable but usable and maintain the semiotics of the original item.

Kamprani calls Uncomfortable “a collection of deliberately inconvenient everyday objects,” adding that “it exists in sketches and 3-D visualizations and has no meaningful purpose.”

Kamprani first started the project for no apparent reason other than she wanted to design something, and making things uncomfortable was challenging and amusing to her.

“My project is very carefully designed to annoy — it feeds from the design of each original object and makes a little joke.”

“I am hoping it is not in the list of ‘another badly designed object’ but in the list of extraordinary deliberately badly designed object(s).”

She is an architect and does the work of a rational engineer by day. By night, she is a design enthusiast, interested both in graphic and product design.

More of Katerina Kamprani‘s wonderfully unique art can be found at http://www.kkstudio.gr/#the-uncomfortable.