Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Normalynn Ablao

Artist Normalynn Ablao has taken her talent for crocheting to a whole other world — the world of food.Based in Lathrop, California, Ablao creates amazing-looking food out of yarn. Her creations are so delicious-looking they often leave you hungry. Swapping starch for stitches, crafter Ablao (aka Copacetic Crocheter) crochets “fiber-rich” crocheted cakes, cookies, and pasta made of 100% yarn.

The pieces are charming in their scale while paying homage to comforting meals.Ablao views the possibilities of a crochet hook in the same way a lettering artist would see a pen.

“The dynamic between the crochet hook and yarn continues to amaze me,” she says. “The crochet hook is like a pen, and together with yarn, it’s as if I’m writing in cursive, which represents beauty and grace.”“I have a profound appreciation for edible art and am grateful I can create fiber food for all of us to enjoy its transient nature over and over again.”

Ablao is a non-profit intermediary helping to raise funds for non-profit organizations.

Her reward, she shares, is fourfold: crocheting is therapeutic; contributing to charity provides the support it needs; helping to improve the welfare of the environment, people and animals are self-fulfilling; and the entire process makes her happier each time.

More of Normalynn Ablao‘s delicious looking creations can be found on her website, https://www.copaceticcrocheter.com/, and at showcases such as Instagram and  https://mymodernmet.com/normalynn-ablao-crochet-food/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery (midweek) — Yarn Bombing

Yarn bombing (also called also called wool bombing, yarn storming, guerrilla knitting, kniffiti, urban knitting, or graffiti knitting) is a type of graffiti or street art that employs colorful displays of knitted or crocheted yarn or fiber rather than paint or chalk.You are likely to see yarn bombing on trees, bicycle racks, and statues, but there have been popular “yarnstallations” that cover vehicles, benches, and even entire buildings.The “bombs” began slowly.  A few poles, and then some trees, and a few other “normal” objects started to get this new “look”, providing them with a positive vibe that people maybe didn’t see before.Initially, yarn bombing was almost exclusively about reclaiming and personalizing sterile public places and giving them a personal touch.Having a need to create something fun, unexpected and beautiful, these artists used yarn to create warmth and comfort inside the urban environment that was often perceived cold, depressing and unfriendly. It has since developed with groups graffiti knitting and crocheting worldwide, each with their own agendas and public graffiti knitting projects being run.In the midst of the growing popularity of the medium and practice, yarn bombers also are striving to maintain an awareness of the environment they are working in, being careful to limit the life of their craft on trees and other live canvases.Showing up on trees, lamp posts, monuments, benches, and other elements of everyday cityscape, the practice is a new artistic form that has been invading our streets in brilliant colors, bringing street art and craft together.Yarn bombing can found on sites all across the Internet. Have fun exploring!

 

 

 

Craft Me This …


I have to say one thing about a creative person — when they get in their “supplies” element, they are like a kid on sugar with a kicker of Mountain Dew. 

People ask us why we like to sit and sew beads on clothes or make little earrings or crochet row after row after row of rows or write boring scenery descriptions or woodwork a cigar box or coffee table. After all, it all seems so boring!

I wonder if these people have truly ever seen creativity let loose in a craft or other specialty store.

I just spent the day with two of my best friends hitting stores like Hobby Lobby and Michael’s and even Good Will. Talk about kids in a candy shop!

I myself am the novice of the group. I write, and also sew bling onto my t-shirts and other inanimate clothing. My other friends are marvelous crafters. One is big BIG into scrap-booking with an occasional crocheted blanket thrown in; the other sews jackets and crochets scarves and other things. One love LOVES paper and trim and little signs you past onto pages and patterned paper for special occasion pages. The other loves every color of yarn there is, along with long, lingering tippy finger tip touching of bolts and bolts of materials with quilts and little jackets in mind for her granddaughter. 

Me? I get brain freeze in the beads aisle. 

The point is, it’s easy to see why creative people love their craft. When in their element, when surrounded by people who understand why they stand in front of a rack of crystals-on-a-string for 10 minutes wondering what they could sew those onto, creative people leave this universe and enter an alternate reality.

In that alternate world they are Master Creators. They can make anything any time, any where, and it will be so magnificent even the angels will squint and say “holy moley!” Time has no meaning in a creative person’s alternate world; when you’re lost writing that perfect passage of love and passion or pensive thought, there is no time sheet. Love takes as long as it takes to write. No more, no less. 

As I’ve gotten older I’ve started surrounding myself with creative people. Not because I’ve changed friends — but because I’ve found out the people I’ve been around for a good chunk of my life are pretty creative on the side. I know painters, quilters, writers, lure makers, poets, wood carvers, fishermen, wood workers, sign makers, dog trainers, and more. Every one loves their craft. Every one of them strive to be better than they were yesterday. And aren’t we all like that in a way?

So some time when you’re bored, ask your neighbor or friend or co-worker what their creative craft is. You’ll be pleasantly surprised.

And if you’re lucky, one day you will be wandering up and down the craft store aisle when a sticker or pearl bead or a piece of wood catches your eye.  Then we will be wandering through the store looking for you, calling out your name.

Holey Moley!