Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Antoni Gaudi

Antoni Gaudí (1852-1926) was a Catalan architect whose distinctive style is characterized by freedom of form, voluptuous color and texture, and organic unity. 

Sagrada Familia

 

Gaudí was born in Catalonia on the Mediterranean coast of Spain on June 25, 1852. He showed an early interest in architecture and went to study in Barcelona — Spain’s most modern city at the time.

Artigas Gardens, La Pobla de Lillet

 

Once he got his degree in architecture in 1878, Gaudí began working on  larger projects.

Casa Calvet

 

He soon became one of the most sought-after architects, and began taking on larger commissions, leaving behind many other one-of-a-kind works in Barcelona.

Casa Vicens

 

Gaudí’s work was influenced by his passions in life: architecture, nature, and religion.

Bodegas Güell

 

He considered every detail of his creations and integrated into his architecture such crafts as ceramics, stained glass, wrought ironwork forging and carpentry.

Church of Colonia Guell

 

Under the influence of neo-Gothic art and Oriental techniques, Gaudí became part of the Modernista movement which was reaching its peak in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Episcopal Palace, Astorga

 

Gaudí’s was highly innovative in terms of his explorations of structure, searching through a variety of regional styles before seizing on the parabolic, hyperbolic, and catenary masonry forms and inclined columns that he developed through weighted models in his workshop.

Casa Batlló

 

These are often integrated with natural and highly symbolic religious imagery that encrust the structure with vibrant, colorful surfaces.

Sagrada Família School

 

More of Antoni Gaudi‘s work can be found at https://www.casabatllo.es/en/antoni-gaudi/ and https://sagradafamilia.org/en/antoni-gaudi/. 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) was an architect and writer whose distinct style helped him became one of the biggest forces in American architecture. 

Taliesin

 

Wright started his own firm and developed a style known as the “Prairie School”, which strove for an “organic architecture” in designs for homes and commercial buildings.

Dana Thomas House

 

These were single-story homes with low, pitched roofs and long rows of casement windows, employing only locally available materials and wood that was always unstained and unpainted, emphasizing its natural beauty.

Fallingwater

 

Wright believed in designing structures that were in harmony with humanity and its environment, a philosophy he called organic architecture.

Grady Gammage Memorial Auditorium

 

As a founder of organic architecture, Wright played a key role in the architectural movements of the twentieth century, influencing three generations of architects worldwide through his works.

Unitarian Society Meeting House

 

Wright designed original and innovative offices, churches, schools, skyscrapers, hotels, museums, and other structures. He often designed interior elements for these buildings, as well, including furniture and stained glass.

Affleck House

 

Considered one of the most radical architects in history, Wright used revolutionary building technologies and materials and experimented with using the natural landscape as part of his designs.

Lewis Spring House

 

Wright was a great originator and a highly productive architect. He designed some 800 buildings, of which 380 were actually built and a number are still standing.

Nathan G. Moore House

 

You can find out more about Frank Lloyd Wright at https://franklloydwright.org.