Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Amber Cowan

Amber Cowan is an artist and educator living in Philadelphia.She is a faculty member of the glass department of Tyler School of Art, where she received her MFA in 2011 in Glass/Ceramics.Cowan’s sculptural glasswork is based around the use of recycled, upcycled, and second-life American pressed glass.She uses the process of flameworking, hot-sculpting and glassblowing to create large-scale sculptures that overwhelm the viewer with ornate abstraction and viral accrual.

With an instinctive nature towards horror vacui (filling of the entire surface of a space or an artwork with detail),  her pieces reference memory, domesticity and the loss of an industry through the re-use of common items from the aesthetic dustbin of American design.The primary material used for her work is glass cullet sourced from scrap yards supplied by now defunct pressed glass factories as well as flea-markets, antique-stores and donations of broken antiques from households across the country.Cowan uses these found pieces to create remarkable one-of-a-kind objects that reference the rise and fall of US glassware manufacturing, while simultaneously offering a new narrative.More of Amber Cohen‘s amazing glasswork can be found at https://ambercowan.com/.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Martin Blank

Martin Blank is one of North America’s premiere figurative glass sculptors with a style quintessentially his own.

Creating tension between sculptural forms that evoke compelling landscapes revealed by the juxtaposition of sculptural elements, Blank’s work is about carving space.Martin Blank was born August 29, 1962 and received his BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1984.

That same year, Blank moved west to begin his professional career in Seattle, working at the center for studio glass and learning from the driving force behind it, Dale Chihuly.Blank worked on the Chihuly team, bringing his infectious enthusiasm and courageous desire to push the material for several years, all the while establishing his own contributions to the glass movement.Whether it is a collection of flower blossoms, a monumental abstract installation, or a figurative sculpture, Martin Blank’s hot sculpted glass is made with a combination of technical exactitude and creative exuberance.

His working relationship with glass is an intimate one, as he wears heat protective clothing, gets very close, and employs his entire body while molding the molten material. 

Intuitive and deliberate, he is nonetheless open to enhancing his visual vocabulary with the happy accidents of glasswork.

More of Martin Blank‘s amazing glasswork can be found at https://www.martinblankstudios.com/

 

 

Sunday/Monday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Latchezar Boyadjiev

Latchezar Boyadjiev was born in Sofia, Bulgaria, and educated the the Academy of Arts in Sofia and the Academy of Applied Arts in Prague, Czechoslovakia, where he studied with Professor Stanislav Libensky, one of the most prominent glass artists of our time.

Boyadjiev came to the United States in 1986, where he taught at the California College of Arts and Crafts.

Boyadjiev begins his sculptures by creating clay sculptures with perfect smooth surfaces and details

Next follows a series of positive and negative molds, a time-consuming and detail-oriented process that leads to the final plaster positive that will determine the outcome of the sculpture.

These  new glass sculptures are cast into yet another mold, and later annealed, partially ground and polished.

Boyadjiev creates amazing glass sculptures that are sensual and fluid, a true joy to behold.

More of  Latchezar Boyadjiev‘s glass sculptures can be found at http://www.latchezarboyadjiev.com/.

Sunday/Monday Evening Art Gallery — Ercole Barovier

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Ercole Barovier (1889-1972) was the son of Benvenuto Barovier and a member of a centuries-long lineage in the family company, Vetreria Artistica Barovier & C. founded in 1295.

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 He was named the artistic director of the company in 1926, and quickly rose up the ranks of the family business.

After becoming sole proprietor in 1936, he merged his family’s company with the Toso family to become Barovier & Toso in 1939.

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Over the course of his 50-year activity, he invented numerous decorative techniques which contributed significantly to the renovation of art glass.
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From the beginning of the Thirties, he dedicated himself entirely to experimenting with new multi-colored effects, in particular he perfected the colorazione a caldo senza fusione technique (staining heat without fusion) which he first used in 1935-36.

 He was active for fifty years in the company, and amassed a portfolio of no fewer than 25,000 designs.

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Barovier’s work is part of many major museums’ collections around the world. 

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More of Ercole Barovier’s work can be found Ercole Barovier.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Dale Chihuly

You use a glass mirror to see your face; you use works of art to see your soul.  ~ George Bernard Shaw

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Dale Chihuly (born September 20, 1941), is an American glass sculptor whose work in glass led to a resurgence of interest in that spectacular medium.

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Chiluly graduated in 1965 from the University of Washington where he first was introduced to glass while studying interior design, then an M.S. in sculpture in 1967 from the University of Wisconsin, where he studied glassblowing with Harvey Littleton.

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He received an MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design, then worked at a renowned glassblowing workshop in Italy where he observed the team approach to blowing glass, which is critical to the way he works today.

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In 1971, Dale Chihuly cofounded Pilchuck Glass School in Washington State.

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The technical difficulties of working with glass forms are considerable, yet Chihuly uses it as the primary medium for installations and environmental artwork.

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Although Chihuly lost the use of his left eye in a car accident in 1976,  his work with assistants has been nothing short of phenominal.

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The artist professed, “Once I stepped back, I liked the view,” and pointed out that it allowed him to see the work from more perspectives and enabled him to anticipate problems faster.

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More of Dale Chihuly‘s fantastic glassworks can be found at http://www.chihuly.com.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Architecture in Blue

I was blue, just as blue as I could be
Ev’ry day was a cloudy day for me
Then good luck came a-knocking at my door
Skies were gray but they’re not gray anymore

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Blue skies
Smiling at me
Nothing but blue skies
Do I see

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Bluebirds
Singing a song
Nothing but bluebirds
All day long

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Never saw the sun shining so bright
Never saw things going so right
Noticing the days hurrying by
When you’re in love, my how they fly

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Blue days
All of them gone
Nothing but blue skies
From now on

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I never saw the sun shining so bright
Never saw things going so right
Noticing the days hurrying by
When you’re in love, my how they fly

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Blue days
All of them gone
Nothing but blue skies
From now on

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Lyrics by Irving Berlin

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Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — René Lalique

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 René Lalique  (April 6, 1860 – May 5, 1945) was a master jeweller and glass designer during the Art Nouveau period.

His superior talent and creativity evolved over time and he developed his style to such an extent that he was able to dominate the Art Deco jewelry and glass market as well.

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He designed an array of beautiful pieces — glass perfume bottles, jewelry, vases, tableware, bottles, lighting, figurines, and in his later years, car hood ornaments.

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In the 1920s , his style morphed from the Art Nouveau nature-inspired forms, to more streamlined pieces to suit the Art Deco aesthetic.

Lalique’s glass pieces became more opalescent, produced by adding phosphates, fluorine and aluminum oxide to glass in order to make it opaque, and by adding tiny amounts of cobalt to produce an internal blue tint.

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His work passes the level of everyday to rare and extraordinary.

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More of   René Lalique‘s exquisite glassworks can be found at http://www.renelalique.com.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Paperweights

From the moment paper was invented, there was a need for paperweights.

Many objects were used to weigh flyaway papers down.

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Obviously, rocks, bricks, and tree branches didn’t work.

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So glass paperweights were created.

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Some of the earliest paperweights were made in Venice in the 1840s.

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The Bohemians improved upon the techniques of the Venetians, and also incorporated the aristry of the French, who really brought the art of the paperweight into full flower.

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Baccarat is unquestionably the most famous and renowned paperweight producer.

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Other paperweight manufacturers included New England Glass Company, Tiffany, Ysart Brothers, Vasart, and Strathearn.

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No matter who created the beautiful works of art, each paperweight brings its own magic into the world.

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The beauty of a moment reflected in the center of glass

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Gaze into the center of a paperweight and see your past — your future

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You can find more works of beauty and light at:

Collectors Weekly http://www.collectorsweekly.com/art-glass/paperweights

Richard Mores Paperweight Photo Album  http://strathearn.smugmug.com/,

and other places across the Internet.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Wine Glasses

In hand-blown crystal glass I see

Reflections of how it used to be

The finest wines in heaven poured

In vessels fit for any Lord

Chalice of Abbe Suger from the Abbey of SaintDenis

 Finely crafted of wood and glass

A stem created from materials past

To hold God’s work in one’s small hand

Is to drink His brew throughout the land

Creations from His thoughts to man’s delight

Turned into a display of shadow and light

Wine glass, engraved, twisted enamel threads in stem. George Bacchus

So fill your glass with revelry bought

Whether water or wine it matters naught

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Drink to love both present and past

And friendships made that ever last

Medieval wine goblet

Poetry by Claudia Anderson ©2015