Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Robert Walker

 

Color Color Color is the first thing you notice in Robert Walker’s paintings.

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Bright, bursting, symmetrical color.

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Robert Walker is a Los Angeles based artist and art historian.

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Walker taught art history at the college level for 25 years and has lectured at universities in both the US, Japan and Thailand and numerous museums in Southern California.

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During his 45 year practice he has fabricated paintings and sculpture that reveal his deep interest in Eastern religions and practices.

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A common theme is the bold use of color and patterns, inspired by the Buddhist mandala tradition; the effect is colorful, expressive and almost hypnotic.

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Walker’s paintings often have a sculptural element, using the materiality of paint to create bas-relief areas across the canvas.

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You can feel the Eastern influence in all of his work if you only look.

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More of Robert Walker‘s colorful art can be found at http://www.robertwalkerstudio.com/.

 

 

What Is Your Color?

I love when I get crafting supplies in the mail. I feel like I’ve won the jackpot. The lottery. The contest. I got a new load of flatback acrylic rhinestones today. Clear, Aurora Clear, Light Blue. Purple. Ruby Red. One inch half domes that make you want to look deeper and deeper into their colored depths.

Visual sensations are amazing. Shiny, dull, opaque, translucent, sparkly, reflective — all send thoughts and reactions through all of us. That’s why we react one way to bright neons, another way to soft pastels. Too much orange or yellow or pink can affect us in ways we’d never think.

Do you work with colors? 

According to Bright Side’s Psychologists Point Out 11 Clothing Colors That Reveal Your Personality, the colors you wear mean something to the world.

The color black is perceived by others as an indicator of prestige, power, seriousness, and intelligence. People who prefer to wear black clothing are ambitious, purposeful but also sensitive. As a rule, they are emotional and easily excitable, although they often try to hide it.
Brown is the color of the earth, the color of something reliable, strong and stable. People who like to wear the color brown are slightly conservative, respect their elders and always look for peace, stability, and strength in everything.
People tend to associate the color blue with intelligence, trust, efficiency, and tranquility. Blue shades of clothing are often chosen by kind, sympathetic, courteous and even shy people.
Those who prefer green lead an active, public life, they always live in a good area and they are financially stable. They are also caring, kind and have a soft heart.
Purple means sophistication, wealth and luxury. People who wear purple are emotional and sensitive, and in clothing indicates creativity, insight, and love of art. They are dreamy, passionate and love mysticism. These people are also known to be unpredictable and dealing with them can be both easy and difficult at the same time.
Red is the color of passion and power. People tend to associate the vibrant color with energy, movement, and excitement. Those who often wear red are bright, easily excitable, slightly self-centered and also addiction-prone.
Yellow is the color of happiness, sun, and laughter. shades of yellow in clothing are often used by active, creative and addicted people. They are bright dreamers and adventurers, ready to explore and conquer.
White is the symbol of freedom, purity, innocence, and simplicity. This  color attracts reliable people who love freedom and who look at life optimistically. These people are very neat and organized in everything they do, they like new beginnings and strive for perfection.
Soft pink is considered calm, warm and feminine and is one of the most powerful sedatives. People who love pink are romantic, optimistic and self-righteous (in a good sense). As a rule, they are people who appreciate kindness and comfort above everything else.
Orange always gives an atmosphere a fun party vibe, in addition to being a warm and opportunistic color. It is also cheerful, creative and attractive. Those who like to wear orange are optimistic, energetic and cheerful, and are eager for change. Although they can be slightly flaky people, still they can be ambitious and prudent.
Gray is the color of balance, Gray and its shades are a symbol of tranquility, dimensionality, and maturity. a person who favors gray is someone who does not like to attract attention and tries to maintain neutral.

SOOOOooooo … 

Do the colors you wear have anything to do with the colors you work with? 

If you knit with a lot of yellows, are you sharing happiness, sun, and laughter? If your sketches have a lot of white space, are you trying to portray freedom, purity, and innocence? If your main character has red hair, are they passionate and powerful?

There’s a lot to think about there. I started making Angel Tears with mostly clear, Aurora clear, light pink and light blue stones. As time has moved on, I’ve started using dark sapphire blues and purples and deep ruby reds. I have a feeling people will love sparkles of all colors hanging around the house.

You are creative to please yourself, but, with so many personalities out there, you try to please others, too.

Let me know your thoughts on color.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Emeralds

 

No matter what anyone says or does, my task is to be emerald, my color undiminished. 

~ Marcus Aurelius

 

Mogul Mughal Emerald

 

Chinese Silk Jacket

 

Emerald Box, Persian Crown Jewels

 

Australian Emerald Dragonfly

 

Antique Baccarat Paperweight

 

 

 

Stotesbury Emerald

 

Villa Pisani Labyrinth, Italy

 

INK Sweets

 

Echeveria Emerald Ripple

 

Emerald Oracle

 

David Morris

 

Thursday Evening on the Veranda — Alexa Klienbard

Alexa Klienbard has focused her work on what human beings must protect in the garden of our Natural Environment.

Individual plant shapes have been cut out of birch wood and feature leaves, blossoms, pods, fruits, and insect pollinators, jaggedly silhouetted and richly painted with traditional oils.

She has  been driven to work on paintings that hint at the potential silence that will be left in our remaining habitats if more and more species are lost forever.

These shaped paintings are each a single character unto themselves, each one reads overall as a single medicinal plant, complete with “dancing leg” roots, standing brave to the onslaught of man’s collective drive to put his species above all others.”

Kleinbard’s paintings, with their close up view of a healing plant and their far away view of a silent world, offers the viewer a chance to ponder the future of our planet.

Her multi-colored creations are beautiful as well as a message to the planet itself.

Alexa Klienbard has no website, but are  for sale across the internet.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Leonid Afremov

The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls.  ~~ Pablo Picasso

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Leonid Afremov (born July 12, 1955 in Vitebsk, Belarus) is a Russian–Israeli modern impressionistic artist who works mainly with a palette knife and oils.

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Afremov likes to view his artwork as politically neutral — no hidden messages, no alternate agenda.

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He tries to draw the viewer towards certain feelings rather than telling a story through his work.

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While Afremov’s early works are influenced by the masterpieces of older painters, his artwork is very unique and recognizable.

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The artist invites us to experience the world of simple beauty which constantly surrounds us.

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Leonid’s art easily transports you to other worlds, other times, other ways of thinking and feeling.

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And, after all, isn’t that the purpose of Art?

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Leonid Afremov’s artwork can be viewed and purchased at https://afremov.com/. You can also follow Leonid and his artwork on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/leonidafremovofficialpage and at Twitter at  https://twitter.com/AfremovArt.

How to Color Your Words

mapI love the curve, the sparkle, of the English language. Especially when used properly.

They say French is a colorful language, as is Spanish. If one uses their words wisely, all languages have beautiful ebbs and flows to them.

Today I was working on an arts and crafts catalog, and came along the glazes section. There were layers of descriptions, of ways to describe the colors. The first layer was the simplest of words: blue, gray, red, pink, purple. Even though we have different opinions on exactly what kind of blue we want, the color swatches were indeed blue and red and gray. Sometimes simplicity works.

Then there’s the second level. Words that are associated with things rather than what it is. Caramel, raspberry, grape, carrot, cinnamon. Who doesn’t know what colors those represent?

The third level was a little more imaginative. Sour Apple, Orkid, Tuscan Red, Pink-a-boo, Wine About It, Cara Bein Blue. You get the gist from title of what the color is. A colorful play on words, to be sure.

Then come the descriptions that stretch your imagination. Snapdragon. Hawaiian Sand. Granada. Sunset Jewel. Strawberry Fields. Yellow Universe. Snow Fire. You kind of know what those colors should be, but you need to check the swatches to be sure. These words leave a lot to the imagination. When I looked up Snapdragon, it was pink and yellow on cream. When I looked up Hawaiian Sand it was black and white and blue. Once my comprehension made sense of it all, the names of the colors shimmered on their own wavelength.

How do you know when to expand your vocabulary, and when to keep it simple?

One trick is to read your sentence(s) out loud. Some words are made to be read in the quiet recesses of your mind. Others are made to read aloud, savoring the alliteration or the rhyming or the pure creativity of the sentence. J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Fellowship of the Ring or George Martin’s A Feast of Crows may sound great being spoken by British actors, but would sound funny with a flat, Midwestern accent.

Know your audience. Too many flowery words may make them roll their eyes and pick up a magazine. Not enough description will do the same thing.

Another trick I learned was from the same arts and crafts catalog. Combining two words, one to evoke an impression, the second the color, is a clever way to leave an impression on the mind. Smokey Merlot, River Rock, Burnt Jade, Weathered Copper, Rustic Mustard, Roasted Eggplant — the combinations are endless. Look at the scene you’re writing, and pull something from the atmosphere and add it to your color.

Read other novels, short stories, and poetry. You will be surprised what phrases and words will call you. When they do, write them down. I have a notebook full of descriptions and words that I thought were lovely, colorful, dramatic, descriptive. I might never use them, but I could get the feel of them.

Use the thesaurus. Sparingly. There is nothing wrong with finding other words for your more mundane ones, but readers can tell if you just picked one off the page or if you thought about it. Make sure the “new” word you use flows along with the rest of them.

And don’t be afraid to make up your own words. I know that’s against most writing rules, but if you have a character that fits the description, use it. If it all flows like the bubbling stream, no one will care. For example, I have a quirky, pretzelly, smart heroine who is an astralologer. A combination of an astronomer and astrologer. Looks weird, but once you get to know her it fits her like a glove.

Colors are everywhere. Learn to describe them, or better yet, let them describe themselves.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Nathalie Miesbach

To my young friends out there:

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Life can be great, but not when you can’t see it.

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So, open your eyes to life:

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to see it in the vivid colors that God gave us

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as a precious gift to His children,

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to enjoy life to the fullest,

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and to make it count.

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Say yes to your life.

Nancy Reagan

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Nathalie Miebach is an artist whose work focuses on the intersection of art and science and the visual articulation of scientific observations. Her woven sculptures interpret scientific data related to astronomy, ecology and meteorology in three-dimensional space.

You can find more of her intricate work at her website, http://nathaliemiebach.com.

Enjoy your wandering.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Colors

Alas, writers always write faster than they think. And here it is, Sunday evening, and I’ve been doing a lot of thinking.

I so want to open an additional page on this website to highlight all the extraordinary images of Art I have come across through my travels. Images that add to the Sunday evening blogs I’ve been creating for you. But I’ve been dissatisfied with my progress, my ideas, my inability to put my thoughts onto the page in just the right way so that I can share them with you.

Like all of you creative muses out there know, you can’t put something out there until it feels right. Yes, there will always be something that needs to be tweaked; thank goodness there is no such thing as perfection.  But it it doesn’t feel right *here* you shouldn’t put it out *there*. You need to take your time. You need to get it right.

So instead, I am going to offer some my own photographs on my Sunday Evening Art Gallery blog…photographs I took. I am in love with color, so that is what this gallery is called. Colors. I hope you enjoy them.

 

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