I’m Getting Published Part 2

The wonderfully exciting and exhausting adventure of printing my own book goes on.

As many of you know, I’m planning on publishing 4 of my novels. I want to give them to my family and friends so they can see what my writing is all about. I’d also sell them through Amazon and WordPress and any which way if someone was interested in the time-travel thread.

But I have started the process three times and have stopped dead in my tracks every time.

I am thinking of going through CreativeSpace. It’s a division of Amazon, and you can publish your book with no  bells and whistles for a very reasonable per-book price.

But then the bells and whistles start going off.

Pick a size –6×9 is most popular. Well, of course, I knew my page count would increase. No biggie. But then I flash through the pages and wonder — should I cut some copy? Are there any mistakes hidden between the pages? Now this is a book that’s been around in one form or another for over 15 years. I think by now if there were any typos I’d have found them. But the thought of putting those words down permanently in a book forever and ever just gives me the heebee geebees. Like I need to proofread it one more time. Well, if I want to get this and another book done by Christmas, that ain’t happening.

Then you have to pick a cover. Sounds easy. But suddenly I have to figure out what kind of impression I want my book to first have to readers. Like WordPress, I can’t afford a custom design, so I go through the free templates a dozen times. Dark blue in a circle? Field of wheat? Flowers?

And what if it’s a series (which it is)? Do  both covers look alike? If it’s a set of two, how will anyone tell them apart? It’s not like there’s a choice of shades of same here.

Should I go with the name Claudia Anderson? C.A. Anderson? A pseudonym? If I go with a pseudonym, how will my friends and family know it’s me? Who is Dream Regret, anyway?

Then there’s getting my book out there. Do it with Amazon and they will list my book. Great. But for an extra fee they will send out notices to libraries, book stores, etc. Is my book that interesting that a library in Montana will want it?

So although I’ve made the decision to publish my book, now that I have to put my foot in the water I’m afraid of an alligator biting it off.

In a day and age such as we live in now, that should be the least of my problems.

Let me know how your publishing dreams went — or are going.

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10 thoughts on “I’m Getting Published Part 2

  1. I am still trying to get an agent and do it the traditional way. I go to conferences. Twitter pitch parties. Critique groups. I’ve gotten tantalizingly close to getting an agent, but still no dice. It’s so time consuming. I agree that without the additional input of an agent, an editor, a copyeditor, a fact-checker, etc, it’s a bit terrifying. There are professional editors you can work with, to at least get the story in as good a shape as you can.

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    1. Do you write anything besides poetry? I imagine it’s hard to get anyone professional to look at your work these days. I am going to keep trying, too, but I got to a point where I wanted my stories to be somewhere besides my computer. You know? Let me know how your search goes.

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      1. I write kids lit. I’ve written many Picture book manuscripts, a middle grade, a chapter book, and I’m writing a young adult. I also have a poetry book. I’ve published individual poems, but not a whole collection yet. An agent was interested in one of my PB mss recently, and we went through a couple of R&Rs, but in the end, she wasn’t as enthusiastic as she’s hoped to be. Still, she is a terrific agent, and I would have been over the moon to be repped by her. Her advice helped me improve my story. It’s a step in the right direction. I don’t give up. But it’s hard, and self-publishing is tempting, but I’m going to keep editing, improving, revising until something clicks. That’s my outlook, despite having my heart trampled by rejections.

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      2. I think that’s the best outlook to have. I still plan on sending our queries — one open door is all I/we need. I love the variety of your writings. I, too, dabble in poetry, but since I’m not versed in the logistics of the art, keep my poems mostly to myself. Let’s get on the wagon and get out stuff out there!

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    1. That’s what I thought. But the little research I did found that you can print your book of poems out for $3 to 6$ each! And depending on who you want to give or distribute to, you can order as you need them. Don’t give up the dream. It is very real — for both of us!

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  2. I didn ‘t see this post before I replied to your comment on my blogpost. My husband publishes his with a company called : createmybooks, for Americans who want to publish in English it is : createmybooks.com/US/en. He just publised his 4th and we have never had problems with it (so far). He also put his email address at the end of his book so people can ask for information. Common girl jump !!! Who knows hey ?? Good luck !!

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    1. You know — you sent me this info in email a while ago. I’ve been looking through my mail but could not find it. THANK YOU for sending it to me again! I haven’t decided on who to go with, so I definitely will check your reference. You are a great friend!

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      1. Why didn’t you ask!!???You can ask me whatever you need or want to know, you are my friend ! Whenever I can help I will !

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