Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Don Esser

Since I have crossed my Internet usage limit until Tuesday, I thought I would repost this one from 5 years ago today!

 

I have often found that letting the artist explain his craft is the most rewarding explanation of all.

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So it is with Don Esser: Blacksmith, Metal Artist, and Sculptor.

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Since 1976, using hammer and anvil, I’ve been pounding, twisting, and shaping hot metal.

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As a self-taught artist, my approach to life and art has always had an element of fearlessness to it. From childhood on, art has always been a natural, joyful part of my life.

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There is a fluid lightness to my work partly because I’m enjoying making it and partly because, after so many years, I have learned the language of my materials.

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I try to capture the essence in as few lines as possible, with a sense of fluidity and grace that can be achieved working in the forge.

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It is a little like stealing fire from the gods and my goal is to put a bit of that sense of wonder into each piece I make.

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That playful quality in my work also means that most of my pieces are one of a kind. 

Breaking the Tape

People often ask, “How long does it take you to make it?”

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My answer is, “36 years of practice, 50-plus years of training, and a lifelong desire to make art.”

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More of Don Esser’s remarkable work can be found at Steel Wool Studio (http://steelwoolstudio.com/don-esser.htm).

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Johnson Tsang

Sculptor Johnson Tsang pushes realism’s boundaries in his sculptures of faces that are stretched and opened up in surreal ways.

The Hong Kong-based artist’s work features surreal contortions that squish, wring, melt, and stretch.

His creativeness suggests an exploration of the limited space between the conscious and subconscious.

Between the self and other.

Tsang uses plain, unglazed clay, letting go of such typical details such as hair and skin color to focus the viewer’s attention on the expressions of his imagined subjects.

Although Tsang grew up poor and worked both in the trades and as a policeman, he says he has always been in love with art.

“The clay seemed so friendly to me, it listened to every single word in my mind and did exactly I was expecting. Every touch was so soothing. I feel like I was touching human skin.”

More of Johnson Tsang‘s wonderfully imaginative art can be found across the Internet including Instagram and Red Seas Gallery.