Sunday Evening Art Gallery (midweek) — Maki-e

Maki-e (蒔絵, literally: sprinkled picture) is Japanese lacquer sprinkled with gold or silver powder as a decoration using a makizutsu or a kebo brush.

George Walter Vincent Smith Art Museum

The oldest Maki-e in existence now is the ornamentation on the sheath of the Kara-tachi sword with gilded silver fittings and inlay in Togidashi technique held by Shōsōin in Nara, Japan.

Kara-tachi Sword (replica)

Maki-e objects were initially designed as household items for court nobles; they soon gained more popularity and were adopted by royal families and military leaders as a symbol of power.

Kōami Shinzaburō

To create different colours and textures, maki-e artists use a variety of metal powders including gold, silver, copper, brass, lead, aluminum, platinum, and pewter, as well as their alloys.

British Museum
Edo Period

Maki-e can be left to dry, as is maki-hanashi, or relacquered and polished (togidashi maki-e).

Ida Senshū

 It is frequently decorated with reed-style pictures (ashide-e) or combined with inlays of other metals or mother-of-pearl (raden). 

Laquered Karabitsu
Late Edo

Hiramaki-e has a low-relief design, and takamaki-e has a high-relief design.

Bamboo tubes and soft brushes of various sizes are used for laying powders and drawing fine lines.

Igarashi Dôho

As it requires highly skilled craftsmanship to produce a maki-e painting, young artists usually go through many years of training to develop the skills and to ultimately become maki-e masters.

Namiki

Maki-e artwork can be found all across the Internet.  

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Riusuke Fukahori

Riusuke Fukahori is known best for his resin-based studies of Japanese goldfish.

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Riusuke Fukahori does it so realistically you never imagine that this is just his 3D art form of goldfish, captured as if time stood still.

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Fukahori alternates between pouring resin into a vessel and painting goldfish with acrylic paint, giving the resulting work a three-dimensional optical effect.

Most of his works are contained in conventional household items, such as cups and bowls.

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The artist was initially attracted to his goldfish because he admired them and viewed their domestication as a metaphor for the stifling conditions of modern life.

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Though he infamously keeps dozens of fish around his studio for observation, Fukahori prefers to execute his works from his impressions and memories, and depicts both existing species of fish and invented hybrids.

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As  Fukahori states, “I didn’t invent resin and not the first to use resin. I am not a resin artist. I am a goldfish artist.”

And as one can see, Riusuke Fukahori does so in exquisite beauty and detail.

More fantastic art by Riusuke Fukahori can be found on his Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/RiusukeFukahori. A fantastic video of Riusuke performing his art can be found at Riusuke Fukahori.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Katsushika Hokusai

An image seen on a hundred different walls, on placemats, screensavers, postcards.

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And yet the incredible history of the artist Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849) is a magical tale of its own.

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Hokusai was born on the 23rd day of 9th month of the 10th year of the Hōreki period (October or November 1760) to an artisan family, in the Katsushika district of Edo, Japan.

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Hokusai was a Japanese master artist and printmaker of ukkiyo-e, a style of wood block prints and paintings.

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Hokusai is best-known as author of the woodblock print series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (c. 1831) which includes the iconic and internationally recognized print, The Great Wave off Kanagawa, created during the 1820s (first image above).

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Hokusai was known by a dozen different names through his lifetime, most likely reflecting the different artistic manifestations he went through.

Flock of Chickens

It is this restlessness, this thirst for life and art, that inspired countless other artesians on this continent and others.

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And it is this quiet beauty that has withstood the winds of time.

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You can see all of Katsushika Hokusai‘s art at his website http://www.katsushikahokusai.org/.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Kirigami


Most have heard of Oragami, but have you heard of Kirigami?

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The major difference between the two is that, in origami, you fold paper, whereas in kirigami, you fold and cut paper.

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Typically, kirigami starts with a folded base, which is then cut;

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cuts are then opened and flattened to make the finished kirigami.

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A difference between kirigami and the art of “pop-up” is that kirigami is made out of a single piece of paper that has been cut into a design.

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Kirigami are usually symmetrical, such as pentagrams and snowflakes.

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It is an art that takes a true plan, a steady hand, and a piece of paper.

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Not to mention … imagination.

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Kirigami artists and clubs can be found throughout the Internet.