Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Xavier Puente Vilardell

Brussels-based sculptor Xavier Puente Vilardell turns blocks of wood into twisting, curled objects that look more like scrolls of paper or pieces of fabric than lumber.Many of these eye-catching sculptural forms resemble architectural structures and other natural forms shaped by wind, rain, and the sea’s turbulent waves.Vilardell’s series of wood pine sculptures are meticulously carved with unique, elegant features.The artist uses pinewood, a malleable material that enables him to make precise and curved structural forms.To create his sculptures, Vilardell uses traditional cutting tools and crafts each piece by hand.His skill and patience enable him to turn the blocks of wood into sculpted forms that twist in every direction, almost appearing to defy gravity.Vilardell says, “Working with wood requires a deep respect for the living being that is necessary to understand its inner nature and characteristics that give a certain personality.”More of Xavier Puente Vilardell‘s skillful sculptures can be found at https://www.xavipuente.com/.

 

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Midweek — Doug Rowell

Doug Rowell is a sculptor and woodcarver.He has carved such impressive pieces as the coffee table from the TV show “Sons of Anarchy” and a solid body, non-electric banjo for Steve Martin.More importantly, Rowell  is internationally known for his custom electric guitar bodies.He carves each guitar one at a time, and each is one of a kind.His commitment to detail and individuality for each client is evident in every piece.The engraving is a truly remarkable work of art so much so that most of his customers choose to hang them on their walls rather than play them.More of Doug Roswell‘s amazing carvings can be found at carverdoug.com.

 

Sunday Evening Art Gallery on Thursday — Gordon Pembridge

Gordon Pembridge was born in Kenya, and as a young boy was lucky enough to experience the wilds of Africa.

Along with many an adventure in the bush, Pembridge developed a passion for natural history.He completed his education at boarding school in Wanganui, New Zealand, then attended art school, taking various courses in design.Pembridge now works for himself and is involved in graphic design, 3-D design, fine art, illustration, photography, digital imaging, and wood turning.Having moved to New Zealand, Pembridge has grown to love the New Zealand bush for its unique flora and fauna.He started wood turning in 2004, developing a series of thin turned pieces with a pierced fern as a signature piece.In these pieces Pembridge explores the boundaries of wood turning on the lathe and then hand carving of intricate designs into the timber.More of Gordon Pembridge‘s masterful art can be found at www.gordonpembridge.com.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery — Welsh Lovespoons

Welsh lovespoons are hand made wooden spoons that are made from one piece of wood and designed and decorated according to the carver’s imagination.

Originally made by young men during the long winter nights or by young men on long sea voyages, they were carved to express that young man’s intentions towards a particular girl.

A lovespoon would be given to a girl as an indication that he wished to court her. A girl may have received lovespoons from several suitors and these would be displayed on the wall of her home.

The earliest surviving lovespoon dating from around 1667 is at the National Museum of Wales at St. Fagans near Cardiff but Welsh lovespoons are known to have been made by the menfolk of Wales before this date.

Today Welsh lovespoons may be given as they were originally, to declare a suitor’s intent, for Dydd Santes Dwynwen, the Welsh equivalent to Valentine’s Day celebrated on January 25th.

They are also given for to commemorate a Wedding Day, an Engagement, the birth of a child, a wedding anniversary, a birthday, or a Christening or Baptism.

 

It is a marvelous tradition that entails craftmanship, heritage, and the truest of emotions — love.

Sunday Evening Art Gallery Blog — Darryl Cox

Artist Darryl Cox fuses ornate vintage picture frames with tree branches found in the forests of central Oregon.

Cox uses many different woods:  central Oregon manzanita, juniper, aspen, Willamette Valley filbert and California grapevine are a few of his favorites.

The branches serve as a simple reminder of the materials used to build picture frames, but also create an unusual form factor where clean lines and ornate moulding patterns seem to naturally traverse the bark of each tree limb.

Each piece involves many hours of woodworking, sculpting, and painting.

Darryl Cox says it perfectly:  “I enjoy seeking out unique frames, wherever they may be. And, I love being outdoors reclaiming extraordinary tree branches and roots. Especially when most of the time it involves spending a day or two in the forests of Central Oregon, but other wonderful places, too.”

More of Darryl Cox’s gorgeous frames can be found at http://fusionframesnw.com/